José Melchor Gomis

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Jose Melchor Gomis (1791-1836) portrait by Gonzalo Salva - original in the Conservatoire, Valencia Jose Melchor Gomis.jpg
Jose Melchor Gomis (1791-1836) portrait by Gonzalo Salvá - original in the Conservatoire, Valencia

José Melchor Gomis y Colomer (6 January 1791 4 August 1836) was a Spanish Romantic composer. He was born in 1791 in Ontinyent, Vall d'Albaida, Valencia Province. [1]

Romantic music music of the Romantic period

Romantic music is a period of Western classical music that began in the late 18th or early 19th century. It is related to Romanticism, the Western artistic and literary movement that arose in the second half of the 18th century, and Romantic music in particular dominated the Romantic movement in Germany.

Composer person who creates music, either by musical notation or oral tradition

A composer is a musician who is an author of music in any form, including vocal music, instrumental music, electronic music, and music which combines multiple forms. A composer may create music in any music genre, including, for example, classical music, musical theatre, blues, folk music, jazz, and popular music. Composers often express their works in a written musical score using musical notation.

Ontinyent Municipality in Valencian Community, Spain

Ontinyent is a municipality in the comarca of Vall d'Albaida in the Valencian Community, Spain. It is situated on the right bank of the Clariano or Ontinyent, a tributary of the Xúquer, and on the Xàtiva–Alcoi railway.

He was director of music for an artillery regiment during the Napoleonic Wars. An early melodrame by Gomis for voice and orchestra was performed at Valencia in 1817. [2]

Napoleonic Wars Series of early 19th century European wars

The Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon: the Third Coalition (1805), the Fourth (1806–07), the Fifth (1809), the Sixth (1813), and the Seventh (1815).

He wrote the music of the Himno de Riego , [3] named after the rebellious General Riego (1784-1823) and since used as the national anthem by various republican governments of Spain.

The "Himno de Riego" is a song dating from the Liberal Triennium and named in honour of Colonel Rafael del Riego, composed by José Melchor Gomis to words by Evaristo Fernández de San Miguel. It was the national anthem of Spain during the Trienio Liberal (1820–1823) and the First (1873–1874) and Second Spanish Republics (1931–1939).

Rafael del Riego Spanish general and politician

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National anthem song that represents a country or sovereign state

A national anthem is generally a patriotic musical composition that evokes and eulogizes the history, traditions, and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nation's government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. The majority of national anthems are marches or hymns in style. The countries of Latin America, Central Asia, and Europe tend towards more ornate and operatic pieces, while those in the Middle East, Oceania, Africa, and the Caribbean use a more simplistic fanfare. Some countries that are devolved into multiple constituent states have their own official musical compositions for them ; their constituencies' songs are sometimes referred to as national anthems even though they are not sovereign states.

Gomis's political views caused him to live in exile after the accession of Ferdinand VII in 1823, in Paris and in London. In both cities he was a friend of his fellow exile the composer Santiago Masarnau, whom he may have introduced to London musical life. In Paris, Gomis wrote a successful singing method, published in 1826 with dedications to Gioacchino Rossini and François-Adrien Boieldieu, and in London his choral work L'inverno was performed in 1827. In 1830 his opera Aben-Humeya was performed in Paris. [4] Gomis's Paris operas Diable à Seville (1831) (staged with the support of Rossini) and Le revenant (1836) gained respectful reviews from Hector Berlioz. [5] Le portefaix , the most successful of his operas, [2] had a libretto by Eugène Scribe (originally offered to the composer Giacomo Meyerbeer). [6]

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Hector Berlioz French Romantic composer

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<i>Le portefaix</i> 1835 opera

Le portefaix is an opéra comique in three acts composed by José Melchor Gomis. The libretto by Eugène Scribe is based on an episode in Le Comte de Villamayor by M. Mortonval. It was originally offered to the composer Giacomo Meyerbeer, but he was contracted instead by the opera manager Louis Véron to create a five-act grand opera.

Gomis was made a Chevalier of the Légion d'honneur by King Louis-Philippe. Gomis died in Paris in 1836 of tuberculosis, leaving a number of works unfinished, including the opera Le comte Julien, also to a libretto by Scribe (and eventually set in 1851 by Sigismond Thalberg as Florinda). [2]

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Tuberculosis Infectious disease caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis

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Sigismond Thalberg Swiss composer and pianist

Sigismond Thalberg was a composer and one of the most famous virtuoso pianists of the 19th century.

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References

Notes
  1. "José Melchor Gomis, un compositor romántico olvidado". El País . 12 August 1978. Retrieved 23 August 2015.
  2. 1 2 3 Dowling (n.d.)
  3. "El Himno de Riego, la música de la República". El Mundo . 28 November 2003. Retrieved 23 August 2015.
  4. Johnson (1993), 67-71
  5. Berlioz (2015), 57.
  6. Letellier (2014), 1
Montmartre Cemetery Jose MELCHOR GOMIS - Cimetiere Montmartre .JPG
Montmartre Cemetery
Sources
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