Joseph A. Meyer

Last updated
Joseph A. Meyer
Biographical details
Born(1893-12-10)December 10, 1893
DiedJuly 14, 1970(1970-07-14) (aged 76)
Cincinnati, Ohio
Playing career
Basketball
1916–1917 Notre Dame
Baseball
1914–1917 Notre Dame
1919 Columbia Comers
Position(s) First baseman (baseball)
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
Football
1920–1935 Xavier
1938–1942 Cincinnati
Basketball
1920–1933 Xavier
Baseball
1926 Xavier
1941–1943 Cincinnati
Head coaching record
Overall94–52 (basketball)
15–14 (baseball) [n 1]

Joseph A. Meyer (December 10, 1893 – July 14, 1970) was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Xavier University from 1920 to 1935 and at the University of Cincinnati from 1938 to 1942. Meyer was also the head basketball coach at Xavier from 1920 to 1933, tallying a mark of 94–52. In addition, he was the head baseball coach at Xavier in 1926 and at Cincinnati in 1942, amassing a career college baseball record of 14–10. Meyer played basketball and baseball at the University of Notre Dame. He died at the age of 75 on July 14, 1970 at his home in Cincinnati, Ohio. [1]

Contents

Head coaching record

Football

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
St. Xavier Saints (Independent)(1920)
1920 St. Xavier 7–1
St. Xavier / Xavier Musketeers (Ohio Athletic Conference)(1921–1935)
1921 St. Xavier 6–21–02nd
1922 St. Xavier 6–2–12–03rd
1923 St. Xavier4–41–215th
1924 St. Xavier2–5–11–1–1T–10th
1925 St. Xavier 5–2–13–1–15th
1926 St. Xavier 9–11–03rd
1927 St. Xavier 8–1–11–0NA
1928 St. Xavier 7–20–1T–12th
1929 St. Xavier 6–40–2T–16th
1930 Xavier 6–42–14th
1931 Xavier 4–3–11–0–1T–6th
1932 Xavier6–2–10–120th
1933 Xavier6–2–11–0NA
1934 Xavier 6–2–12–15th
1935 Xavier 1–2 [n 2] 0–0NA
Xavier:89–39–816–10–3
Cincinnati Bearcats (Independent)(1938–1942)
1938 Cincinnati 4–5
1939 Cincinnati 4–3–2
1940 Cincinnati 5–3–1
1941 Cincinnati 6–3
1942 Cincinnati 8–2
Cincinnati:27–16–3
Total:116–55–11

Baseball

Statistics overview
SeasonTeamOverallConferenceStandingPostseason
Xavier Musketeers (1926)
1926Xavier8–2
Xavier:8–2
Cincinnati Bearcats (1941–1943)
1941CincinnatiN/A [n 1]
1942Cincinnati6–9
1943Cincinnati1–3
Cincinnati:7–12
Total:15–14 [n 1]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Records for 1941 are unavailable.
  2. Meyer resigned after the first three games of the 1935 season. He was replaced by Clem Crowe, who led the team for the final six games. Xavier finished the year with an overall record of 6–3.

Related Research Articles

Urban Meyer American football coach

Urban Frank Meyer III is an American football coach who is the head coach of the Jacksonville Jaguars of the National Football League (NFL). Meyer previously served as the head coach of the Bowling Green Falcons from 2001 to 2002, the Utah Utes from 2003 to 2004, the Florida Gators from 2005 to 2010, and the Ohio State Buckeyes from 2012 to 2018. He retired from coaching in 2019 at the end of the Rose Bowl, and stayed at Ohio State as an assistant athletic director and was also an analyst for Fox Sports, appearing weekly on their Big Noon Kickoff pre-game show. In 2021, Meyer came out of retirement to become the head coach of the Jaguars, marking his first job in the NFL.

Red Badgro American football end and coach

Morris Hiram "Red" Badgro was an American football player and football coach who also played professional baseball. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1981.

Wallace Wade

William Wallace Wade was an American football player and coach of football, basketball, and baseball, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at the University of Alabama from 1923 to 1930 and at Duke University from 1931 to 1941 and again from 1946 to 1950, compiling a career college football record of 171–49–10. His tenure at Duke was interrupted by military service during World War II. Wade's Alabama Crimson Tide football teams of 1925, 1926, and 1930 have been recognized as national champions, while his 1938 Duke team had an unscored upon regular season, giving up its only points in the final minute of the 1939 Rose Bowl. Wade won a total of ten Southern Conference football titles, four with Alabama and six with the Duke Blue Devils. He coached in five Rose Bowls including the 1942 game, which was relocated from Pasadena, California to Durham, North Carolina after the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Clem Crowe

Clem F. Crowe was an American gridiron football and basketball player and coach. He served as the head football coach at Saint Vincent College (1926–1931), Xavier University (1936–1943), and the University of Iowa (1945), compiling a career college football record of 71–66–5. Crowe was also the head basketball coach at Saint Vincent College (1928–1932), Xavier (1933–1943), and the University of Notre Dame (1944–1945), tallying a career college basketball mark of 152–115. He later coached professional football for the Buffalo Bills and Baltimore Colts of the All-America Football Conference (AAFC), and the Ottawa Rough Riders and BC Lions of the Canadian Football League (CFL).

Chester Pittser

Chester Matthias Pittser was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach at the college level. He served as the head football coach at the Montana State School of Mines— then known as Montana Tech of the University of Montana— from 1920 to 1921, Miami University in Oxford, Ohio from 1924 to 1931, and at Montclair State Teachers College—now known as Montclair State University—from 1934 to 1942, compiling a career college football record of 82–45–5. Pittser was also the head basketball coach at Montclair State from 1934 to 1944, tallying a mark of 123–67, and the head baseball coach at Miami (1925–1931) and Montclair State (1935–1943), amassing a career college baseball record of 129–67–2.

Cincinnati Bearcats

The Cincinnati Bearcats are the athletic teams that represent the University of Cincinnati. The teams are members of the American Athletic Conference, which from 1979 to 2013 was known as the Big East Conference. Cincinnati and Wichita State University are currently the only members of The American that are located in the Midwestern United States; all other members are in the Northeast or South.

Ray Courtright

Raymond O. Courtright was an American football, basketball, and baseball player, coach of football, basketball, golf, and wrestling, and college athletics administrator. Courtright attended the University of Oklahoma where he played halfback for the football team from 1911 to 1913 and also competed in baseball, basketball and track. He was the head football coach at Pittsburg State University (1915–1917), the University of Nevada, Reno (1919–1923), and Colorado School of Mines (1924–1926). Courtright was also an assistant football coach (1927–1936), head golf coach (1929–1944) and head wrestling coach (1942–1944) at the University of Michigan.

Ralph Hutchinson

Ralph Fielding "Hutch" Hutchinson was an American football, basketball, and baseball player. He served as the head football coach at Dickinson College (1901), the University of Texas at Austin (1903–1905), the University of New Mexico (1911–1916), Washington & Jefferson College (1918), the University of Idaho (1919), and the Idaho Technical Institute (1920–1927), compiling a career college football record of 61–53–6. Hutchinson was also the head basketball coach at New Mexico (1910–1917), Idaho (1919–1920), and Idaho Technical (1926–1927), amassing a career college basketball record of 56–18, and the head baseball coach at Texas from 1904 to 1906 and at New Mexico from 1910 to 1917, tallying a career college baseball mark of 69–44–2.

Jack Meagher

John Francis Meagher was an American football player, coach of football, basketball, and baseball, and college athletics administrator.

Ned W. Wulk was an American basketball and baseball coach. He served as the head men's basketball coach at Arizona State University from 1958 to 1982, compiling a record of 406–272. His 406 wins are the most of any head coach history of the Arizona State Sun Devils men's basketball program. Wells Fargo Arena's basketball court was named after him in 1999. At the time of his 400th victory, he was one of only four active coaches to win 400 or more games at one school. He led Arizona State to 17 winning seasons in his 25 years and a record of 39–15 against rival Arizona.

Frank Bridges

Frank Bogart Bridges Sr. was an American football, basketball, and baseball coach. He served as the head football coach at Baylor University from 1920 to 1925, Simmons University—now known as Hardin–Simmons University—from 1927 to 1929, and St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas from 1935 to 1939. Bridges was also the head basketball coach at Baylor from 1920 to 1926, at Simmons from 1927 to 1929, and at St. Mary's from 1935 to 1939, tallying a career college basketball mark of 104–135. In addition, he was Baylor's head baseball coach from 1920 to 1927, amassing a record of 95–73, and the head baseball coach at St. Mary's in 1938. In 1944, Bridges served as the co-head coach with Pete Cawthon and Ed Kubale for the Brooklyn Tigers of the National Football League (NFL). He graduated from Harvard University.

Leslie Mann (athlete) American baseball player

Leslie Mann was an American college football player, professional baseball player; and football and basketball coach. He played outfield in the Major Leagues from 1913 to 1928. He played for the Boston Braves, St. Louis Cardinals, Cincinnati Reds, New York Giants, and Chicago Cubs. He was the head basketball coach at Rice Institute Indiana University and Springfield College. He compiled a career record of 43–30 in five seasons as a head basketball coach.

Tommy Mills

Thomas Emmet Mills was an American football player, coach of football, basketball, and baseball, and college athletics administrator. He served as the head football coach at Creighton University (1915–1919), Beloit College (1920–1925), Georgetown University (1930–1932), and Arkansas State College (1934–1935), compiling a career college football record of 63–45–12. Mills was the head baseball coach at the University of Notre Dame from 1927 to 1929, during which time he was also an assistant football coach at the school under Knute Rockne. In addition, Mills was the head basketball coach at Creighton (1916–1920), Beloit (1920–1923), and Arkansas State (1935–1936), amassing a career college basketball record of 107–25. Mills died at the age of 60 on February 25, 1944, of a heart attack at the Rockne Memorial Field House in Notre Dame, Indiana. He served as the director of the field house for the four years before his death.

Xavier Musketeers mens basketball

The Xavier Musketeers men's basketball team represents Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio. The school's team currently competes in the Big East Conference. They are one of two Big East programs to have never made a Final Four. Xavier has appeared in the NCAA Tournament 27 times, 15 times in the last 17 years. On March 11, 2018, Xavier earned its first ever No. 1 seed for the NCAA Tournament and solidified their status as the best team in program history.

Toledo Rockets football

The Toledo Rockets football team is a college football program in Division I FBS, representing the University of Toledo. The Rockets compete in the Mid-American Conference. Toledo began playing football in 1917, although it did not field teams in 1931, and 1943–1945. Since the inception of the AP Poll in 1936 Toledo has finished in the Top 25 four times. Its highest finish came in 1970 when it ranked No. 12 after finishing 12–0–0. The University of Toledo has a 10–7 record in bowl games. The Rockets were the 2017 MAC champions. The team's head coach is Jason Candle.

The Xavier Musketeers football program, formerly known as the St. Xavier Saints, was an American football program that represented Xavier University of Cincinnati in college football from 1900 to 1943 and 1946 to 1973. Xavier discontinued its participation in intercollegiate football following the 1973 season, citing the escalating cost of the sport and resulting deficits.

Joseph Truskowski

Joseph E. "Truck" Truskowski was an American football, basketball and baseball player and coach. He played college football, basketball and baseball at the University of Michigan. He later served as the head baseball coach at Iowa State from 1936 to 1937 and at Wayne State in 1941 and from 1946 to 1959.

Jerald Joseph Jones was an American football and baseball player and coach. He played professional football in the first years of the National Football League (NFL), from 1920 to 1924, with the Decatur/Chicago Staleys—now known as the Chicago Bears, the Rock Island Independents, the Toledo Maroons and the Cleveland Bulldogs. Prior to his professional career, Jones played at college football for the Notre Dame Fighting Irish. He was also a member of the Great Lakes Navy Bluejackets football team in 1918.

The 1935 Xavier Musketeers football team was an American football team that represented Xavier University as an independent during the 1935 college football season. The team compiled a 6–3 record, shut out six of nine opponents, and outscored all opponents by a total of 164 to 35. The team played its home games at Corcoran Field in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati–Xavier rivalry

The Cincinnati–Xavier rivalry is a college sports rivalry between the University of Cincinnati Bearcats and the Xavier University Musketeers. The two schools are separated by less than 3 miles (4.8 km) in Cincinnati, making the archrivalry one of the closest major rivalries in the country. The rivalry dates to their first college football game between the teams in 1918. The first men's college basketball game was played in 1927, which has become the most famous sport in the rivalry, known as the Crosstown Shootout. National outlets cover the game each year, many considering that it is one of the fiercest rivalries in college basketball. The college football series would run until the Xavier Musketeers football ceased play after their final season in 1973. Many other sports at the universities, such as baseball, also face off annually.

References

  1. "Joseph A. Meyer" (PDF). The New York Times . July 16, 1970. Retrieved February 10, 2012.