Joseph Iléo

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Joseph Iléo
Joseph Ileo, 1960.jpg
Joseph Iléo in 1960
2nd Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
In office
5 September 1960 20 September 1960
President Joseph Kasa-Vubu
Preceded by Patrice Lumumba
Succeeded by Justin Marie Bomboko (as Chairman of the Board of Commissioners-General)
In office
9 February 1961 2 August 1961
President Joseph Kasa-Vubu
Preceded by Justin Marie Bomboko (as Chairman of the Board of Commissioners-General)
Succeeded by Cyrille Adoula
President of the Senate of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
In office
22 June 1960 5 September 1960
Deputy Jacques Masangu
(First Vice-President)

Joseph Okito
(Second Vice-President)
Succeeded by Victor Koumorico
Personal details
Born15 September 1921
Léopoldville, Belgian Congo
(Now Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo)
Died19 September 1994(1994-09-19) (aged 73)
Brussels, Belgium
Political party Mouvement National Congolais
Parti Démocrate Social Chrétien (1990–1994)

Joseph Iléo (15 September 1921 – 19 September 1994), subsequently Zairianised as Sombo Amba Iléo, [1] was a politician in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and was prime minister for two periods.

Contents

Early life

Joseph Iléo was born on 15 September 1921. [2]

In 1956, he was one of the authors of Manifeste de la Conscience Africaine, which demanded the right of Africans to self-rule. In 1958, he was one of the founders of the Mouvement National Congolais . When the movement split a year later, he joined the camp led by Albert Kalonji. [3]

After independence and later life

Joseph Ileo at a later age Joseph Ileo.jpg
Joseph Iléo at a later age

Iléo was voted into the Senate and then voted its president on June 1960. Upon the dismissal of then-prime minister Patrice Lumumba, Iléo was declared prime minister by Congolese president, Joseph Kasa-Vubu, on 5 September 1960. He held the post until 20 September 1960. [4] Under his successor, Justin Marie Bomboko, he served as Minister of Information. He was again declared prime minister on 9 February 1961. He remained in this post until 2 August 1961.

From March to December 1979 Iléo served as President of the National Assembly. [2]

In April 1990, he founded the Parti Démocrate Social Chrétien , serving as chairman of the party until his death. He died on 19 September 1994, aged 73. [2]

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References

  1. "Democratic Republic of the Congo". Cartage. Archived from the original on 6 June 2011. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  2. 1 2 3 "ILEO SONGO AMBA Joseph". Assemblée nationale. National Assembly of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. 28 July 2015. Archived from the original on 19 September 2015. Retrieved 1 December 2016.
  3. "Zaire Chronology of Important Events". Country Studies Series. Federal Research Division of the Library of Congress. December 1993. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
  4. "USA/Africa: New Data on Murder of Lumumba". University of Pennsylvania – African Studies Center. 1 August 2002. Retrieved 24 May 2008.
Political offices
Preceded by
Patrice Lumumba
Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
5 September 1960 – 20 September 1960
Succeeded by
Justin Marie Bomboko
Preceded by
Justin Marie Bomboko
Prime Minister of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
9 February 1961 – 2 August 1961
Succeeded by
Cyrille Adoula