Joseph LaShelle

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Joseph LaShelle, ASC
LashellePortrait.jpg
Promotional Portrait, shown with Fox's proprietary Fox Studio Camera
Born(1900-07-09)July 9, 1900
DiedAugust 20, 1989(1989-08-20) (aged 89)
Occupation Cinematographer
Awards Best Black and White Cinematography
1945 Laura

Joseph LaShelle ASC (July 9, 1900 - August 20, 1989) was an American film cinematographer. [1]

Contents

He won an Academy Award for Laura (1944), and was nominated on eight additional occasions.

Career

LaShelle's first job in the film industry was as an assistant in the Paramount West Coast Studio lab in 1920. Instead of going to college as planned, he remained in the film industry after a promotion to supervisor of the printing department.

In 1925, Charles G. Clarke convinced him he should be a cameraman. He went to work with Clarke and after three months he was promoted to second cameraman, and he worked for various cinematographers at the Hollywood Metropolitan Studios. LaShelle was transferred from Metropolitan to Pathé where he began a 14-year association with Arthur C. Miller. He later went with Miller to Fox Films. [2]

After working as a camera operator on Fox productions such as How Green Was My Valley (1941) and The Song of Bernadette (1943), he was promoted and became a cinematographer in 1943. He was a member of the A.S.C. [3]

Some of his well-known works are the film noirs: Laura (1944), for which he won an Oscar; Fallen Angel (1945); and Road House (1948). He is remembered for his work with Otto Preminger and Billy Wilder.


Filmography

Source: [4]

Television

LaShelle also worked in television, such as the first episode of The Twilight Zone in 1959 ("Where Is Everybody?").

Accolades

Wins

Nominations

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References

  1. Joseph LaShelle on IMDb.
  2. Steeman, Albert. Internet Encyclopedia of Cinematographers, "Joseph LaShelle page," Rotterdam, The Netherlands, 2007. Last accessed: December 13, 2007.
  3. Katz's Film Encyclopedia at TheOscarSite.com. Last accessed: December 13, 2007.
  4. Goble, Alan. The Complete Index to World Film, since 1885. 2008. Index home page.