Joseph Martin (Canadian politician)

Last updated

Margaret A. Ormsby (1958). British Columbia: A History. MacMillan: Vancouver.
  • James Morton (1974). In the Sea of Sterile Mountains: The Chinese in British Columbia . J.J. Douglas: Vancouver.
  • Related Research Articles

    The Progressive Party of Canada was a federal-level political party in Canada in the 1920s until 1930. It was linked with the provincial United Farmers parties in several provinces, and it spawned the Progressive Party of Saskatchewan, and the Progressive Party of Manitoba, which formed the government of that province. The Progressive Party was part of the farmers' political movement that included federal and provincial Progressive and United Farmers' parties.

    There have been various groups in Canada that have nominated candidates under the label Labour Party or Independent Labour Party, or other variations from the 1870s until the 1960s. These were usually local or provincial groups using the Labour Party or Independent Labour Party name, backed by local labour councils made up of many union locals in a particular city, or individual trade unions. There was an attempt to create a national Canadian Labour Party in the late 1910s and in the 1920s, but these were only partly successful.

    Charles Augustus Semlin Canadian politician

    Charles Augustus "Charlie" Semlin was a Canadian politician and rancher.

    Gulzar Singh Cheema Indian-born Canadian physician and politician

    Gulzar Singh Cheema is an Indian-born Canadian physician and politician. Cheema was a member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1988 to 1993, and a member of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia from 2001 to 2004, making him one of only a few Canadian politicians to sit in two provincial legislatures since Confederation. He is the first Indian-born person to be elected MLA in Canada. He was also a cabinet minister in the government of Premier of British Columbia Gordon Campbell from 2001 to 2004, and was a candidate of the Liberal Party of Canada in the federal election of 2004.

    2005 British Columbia general election

    The 2005 British Columbia general election was held on May 17, 2005, to elect members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) of the Province of British Columbia (BC), Canada. The British Columbia Liberal Party formed the government of the province prior to this general election under the leadership of Premier Gordon Campbell. The main opposition was the British Columbia New Democratic Party, whose electoral representation was reduced to two MLAs in the previous provincial election in 2001.

    The 1924 British Columbia general election was the sixteenth general election in the Province of British Columbia, Canada. It was held to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia. The election was called on May 10, 1924, and held on June 20, 1924. The new legislature met for the first time on November 3, 1924.

    1920 British Columbia general election

    The 1920 British Columbia general election was the fifteenth general election for the Province of British Columbia, Canada. It was held to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia. The election was called on October 23, 1920, and held on December 1, 1920. The new legislature met for the first time on February 8, 1921.

    1912 British Columbia general election

    The 1912 British Columbia general election was the thirteenth general election for the Province of British Columbia, Canada. It was held to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia. The election was called on February 27, 1912, and held on March 28, 1912. The new legislature met for the first time on January 16, 1913.

    The 1898 British Columbia general election was held in 1898. It was held to elect members of the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia.

    John McDowell was a British-born Canadian merchant and politician in Manitoba. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba as a Progressive Conservative from 1945 to 1958.

    Gunnar Solmunder (Solly) Thorvaldson, was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1941 to 1949, and in the Senate of Canada from 1958 until his death. Originally elected as a Conservative, he sat as a Progressive Conservative after the party changed its name in 1943.

    Joseph Bernier Canadian politician

    Joseph Bernier was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba on four occasions between 1900 and 1932. Bernier was a member of the Conservative Party, and served as a cabinet minister in the government of Rodmond Roblin. His father, Thomas A. Bernier, was a member of the Senate of Canada.

    Thomas Boniface Molloy was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba from 1914 to 1915, as a member of the Liberal Party.

    Colin H. Campbell Canadian politician

    Colin H. Campbell was a politician in Manitoba, Canada. He served in the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba as a Conservative from 1899 to 1914, and was a cabinet minister in the governments of Hugh John Macdonald and Rodmond Roblin.

    The Manitoba Cooperative Commonwealth Federation was the primary opposition party in the 1949 provincial election, challenging the coalition government of Liberal-Progressives and Progressive Conservatives. Seven of the party's candidates were elected. Some CCF candidates have their own biography pages; information about others may be found here.

    Herbert Wilfred (Bert) Herridge was a Canadian politician and Member of Parliament.

    Thomas Robert McInnes Canadian politician

    Thomas Robert McInnes or (Gaelic) Tòmas Raibeart Mac Aonghais was a Canadian physician, Member of Parliament, Senator, and the sixth Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia.

    The 8th Legislative Assembly of British Columbia sat from 1899 to 1900. The members were elected in the British Columbia general election held in July 1898. Robert Beaven was asked to form a government but was not able to garner sufficient support, so Charles Augustus Semlin became premier. After a major government bill was defeated in February 1900, Semlin's government was dismissed. Joseph Martin succeeded Semlin but his government was subsequently defeated on a motion of no-confidence. An election followed later that year.

    Eric Charles Fitzgerald Martin was an accountant, stock broker and political figure in British Columbia. He represented Vancouver-Burrard in the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia from 1952 to 1966 as a Social Credit member.

    References

    1. "Biography – MARTIN, JOSEPH". Dictionary of Canadian Biography.
    2. William Cochrane, ed. (1894). The Canadian album: men of Canada, Volume III (PDF). Brantford, Ontario: Bradley, Garretson & Co. pp.  30.
    3. Ormsby, 320–325
    4. Francis (ed), Daniel (2000) [1999]. Francis, Daniel (ed.). Encyclopedia of British Columbia. Harbour Publishing. p. 450. ISBN   1-55017-200-X.{{cite book}}: |last= has generic name (help)
    5. "Biographie – MARTIN, JOSEPH – Volume XV (1921-1930) – Dictionnaire biographique du Canada".
    6. Morton, 240
    7. Morton, 220–222
    8. Shoreditch Observer 2 May 1914
    9. "News in Brief." Times [London, England] 1 June 1914: 6. The Times Digital Archive. Web. 29 May 2016.
    10. Liverpool Echo 6 Jul 1914
    Joseph Martin
    Joseph Martin.png
    "Fighting" Joe Martin
    13th Premier of British Columbia
    In office
    February 28, 1900 June 14, 1900
    Parliament of Canada
    Preceded by Member of Parliament for Winnipeg
    1893–1896
    Succeeded by
    Political offices
    Preceded by
    Multi Member Riding
    Member of BC Legislature for Vancouver (City)
    18981907
    Succeeded by
    Multi Member Riding
    Parliament of the United Kingdom
    Preceded by Member of Parliament for St Pancras East
    19101918
    Constituency abolished