Joseph Valentine

Last updated
Joseph A. Valentine
Ameche-Valentine-Colbert-Foran in Guest Wife.jpg
Left to right: Don Ameche, Joseph Valentine, Claudette Colbert, and Dick Foran on the set of Guest Wife (1945.
Born
Giuseppe Valentino

(1900-07-24)July 24, 1900
New York City, New York
DiedMay 18, 1949(1949-05-18) (aged 48)
Cheviot Hills, California
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active1924–1949

Joseph A. Valentine (July 24, 1900 in New York City, as Giuseppe Valentino – May 18, 1949 in (Cheviot Hills, California) [1] was an Italian-American cinematographer, five-time nominee for the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, and co-winner once in 1949. [2]

Contents

Trained in photography, he moved to working in films in the 1920s and from 1924 became a chief cinematographer. Working on several B-films, his final years were spent on the cinematography for three Alfred Hitchcock films.

Valentine was nominated for the Academy Award in 1937 for Wings Over Honolulu , in 1938 for Mad About Music , in 1939 for First Love , in 1940 for Spring Parade. In 1949, on his fifth nomination, he won for Joan of Arc .

Partial filmography

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References

  1. Whitty, Stephen (2016-06-09). The Alfred Hitchcock Encyclopedia. ISBN   9781442251601.
  2. https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0884252/awards