Julian Scott

Last updated
Julian A. Scott
Julian-scott-cdv.JPG
Born(1846-02-14)February 14, 1846
Johnson, Vermont
Died July 4, 1901(1901-07-04) (aged 55)
Plainfield, New Jersey
Place of burial Hillside Cemetery, Scotch Plains, New Jersey
Allegiance United States of America
Union
Service/branch United States Army
Union Army
Years of service 1861 - 1863
Rank Drummer
Unit 3rd Vermont Infantry
Battles/wars American Civil War
*Battle of Lee's Mills
Awards Medal of Honor

Julian A. Scott (February 14, 1846 July 4, 1901), was born in Johnson, Vermont, and served as a Union Army drummer during the American Civil War, where he received America's highest military decoration the Medal of Honor for his actions at the Battle of Lee's Mills. He was also an American painter and Civil War artist.

Johnson, Vermont Town in Vermont, United States

Johnson is a town in Lamoille County, Vermont, United States. The population was 3,274 at the 2000 census. Johnson is home of Johnson State College, a part the Vermont State Colleges system. The Vermont Studio Center is located in the village of Johnson, a part of the town.

Union Army Land force that fought for the Union during the American Civil War

During the American Civil War, the Union Army referred to the United States Army, the land force that fought to preserve the Union of the collective states. Also known as the Federal Army, it proved essential to the preservation of the United States of America as a working, viable republic.

American Civil War Civil war in the United States from 1861 to 1865

The American Civil War was a war fought in the United States from 1861 to 1865, between the North and the South. The Civil War is the most studied and written about episode in U.S. history. Primarily as a result of the long-standing controversy over the enslavement of black people, war broke out in April 1861 when secessionist forces attacked Fort Sumter in South Carolina shortly after Abraham Lincoln had been inaugurated as the President of the United States. The loyalists of the Union in the North proclaimed support for the Constitution. They faced secessionists of the Confederate States in the South, who advocated for states' rights to uphold slavery.

Contents

Family

Julian Scott was the fourth child, of eight, born to Charles Scott (born 1815), a clockmaker, and his wife Lucy Kellum (1821 - 26 April 1855). Julian's siblings were Cleora (born 1841), Lucian (1843 - 19 July 1894), Alice (1844 – 1846), Julia (born 1847), Charlie (born 1849), H. Percy (born 1851) and George (26 April 1855 - 27 December 1863). Lucy Scott died in childbirth and Charles Scott remarried, in 1860, to Susan Pollard.

During the American Civil War, Julian's elder brother, Lucian, served with the 4th Regiment of the U.S. Artillery, was wounded at the Battle of Ball's Bluff, was taken prisoner in December 1864, and almost died at Libby Prison of starvation. Julian's younger brother, Charlie, enlisted at age 13 and became a bugler. After the war, Charlie moved to Missouri, then to Boston, where he became a physician. His brother, Percy, became an attorney in Illinois.

Battle of Balls Bluff battle of the American Civil War

The Battle of Ball's Bluff in Loudoun County, Virginia on October 21, 1861, was one of the early battles of the American Civil War, where Union Army forces under Major General George B. McClellan, suffered a humiliating defeat.

Libby Prison Confederate prison at Richmond, Virginia during the American Civil War

Libby Prison was a Confederate prison at Richmond, Virginia, during the American Civil War. It gained an infamous reputation for the overcrowded and harsh conditions under which officer prisoners from the Union Army were kept. Prisoners suffered from disease, malnutrition and a high mortality rate. By 1863, one thousand prisoners were crowded into large open rooms on two floors, with open, barred windows leaving them exposed to weather and temperature extremes.

Scott married and had one daughter but, later, he and his wife separated.

Biography

Scott received his early education at the Lamoille Academy, known today as Johnson State College where the main gallery is named in his memory. Scott continued his studies, graduating from the National Academy of Design in New York and subsequently studied under Emmanuel Leutze until 1868. During the Civil War, Scott enlisted in the 3rd Vermont Infantry on June 1, 1861, at the age of 15 as a fifer and, in February 1865, received the Medal of Honor for rescuing wounded soldiers while under enemy fire during the Battle at Lee's Mills, Virginia.

Lamoille County, Vermont County in the United States

Lamoille County is a county located in the U.S. state of Vermont. As of the 2010 census, the population was 24,475, making it the third-least populous county in Vermont. Its shire town is the town of Hyde Park. The county was created in 1835 and organized the following year.

Johnson State College

Johnson State College was a small public liberal arts college in Johnson, Vermont. Founded in 1828 by John Chesamore, in 2018 it was merged with the former Lyndon State College to create Northern Vermont University.

New York City Largest city in the United States

The City of New York, usually called either New York City (NYC) or simply New York (NY), is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2017 population of 8,622,698 distributed over a land area of about 302.6 square miles (784 km2), New York is also the most densely populated major city in the United States. Located at the southern tip of the state of New York, the city is the center of the New York metropolitan area, the largest metropolitan area in the world by urban landmass and one of the world's most populous megacities, with an estimated 20,320,876 people in its 2017 Metropolitan Statistical Area and 23,876,155 residents in its Combined Statistical Area. A global power city, New York City has been described as the cultural, financial, and media capital of the world, and exerts a significant impact upon commerce, entertainment, research, technology, education, politics, tourism, art, fashion, and sports. The city's fast pace has inspired the term New York minute. Home to the headquarters of the United Nations, New York is an important center for international diplomacy.

When the war was over, he traveled to Paris and Stuttgart to continue his education. Scott's 1872 masterwork, the Battle of Cedar Creek, is located at the Vermont State House. The painting illustrates the contributions of his home state of Vermont in the American Civil War and is significant for its absence of glorification of war and instead shows the suffering and human sacrifice associated with war. Scott traveled west as part of a census party, painting Native Americans in New Mexico, Arizona, and Oklahoma. Many of his works from this expedition now hang in the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Art.

Paris Capital of France

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of 105 square kilometres and an official estimated population of 2,140,526 residents as of 1 January 2019. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, diplomacy, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts.

Stuttgart Place in Baden-Württemberg, Germany

Stuttgart is the capital and largest city of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. Stuttgart is located on the Neckar river in a fertile valley known locally as the "Stuttgart Cauldron." It lies an hour from the Swabian Jura and the Black Forest. Its urban area has a population of 609,219, making it the sixth largest city in Germany. 2.7 million people live in the city's administrative region and another 5.3 million people in its metropolitan area, making it the fourth largest metropolitan area in Germany. The city and metropolitan area are consistently ranked among the top 20 European metropolitan areas by GDP; Mercer listed Stuttgart as 21st on its 2015 list of cities by quality of living, innovation agency 2thinknow ranked the city 24th globally out of 442 cities and the Globalization and World Cities Research Network ranked the city as a Beta-status world city in their 2014 survey.

Vermont State House capitol building

The Vermont State House, located in Montpelier, is the state capitol of the U.S. state of Vermont. It is the seat of the Vermont General Assembly. The current Greek Revival structure is the third building on the same site to be used as the State House. Designed by Thomas Silloway in 1857 and 1858, it was occupied in 1859.

Scott was interred in Hillside Cemetery located in Scotch Plains, New Jersey. [1]

Hillside Cemetery is a cemetery located in Scotch Plains, New Jersey. The cemetery is situated on 125 gently rolling acres. The landscape offers a serene setting ideally suited for cemetery purposes. Hillside Cemetery was established as a non-sectarian, non-profit organization in 1886 under the state laws of New Jersey, which carefully guard the rights of lot owners and ensure the safety, permanence and prudent governance of the cemetery.

Scotch Plains, New Jersey Township in Union County, New Jersey, U.S.

Scotch Plains is a township in Union County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 Census, the township's population was 23,510, reflecting an increase of 778 (+3.4%) from the 22,732 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,572 (+7.4%) from the 21,160 counted in 1990.

Notable paintings

<i>Surrender of a Confederate Soldier</i> painting by Julian Scott

Surrender of a Confederate Soldier is an 1873 painting by Julian Scott in the collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The painting depicts an injured soldier of the Confederate States Army in the American Civil War waiving an improvised flag of surrender. The soldier is accompanied by black man and a woman holding an infant: the black man is presumed to be the soldier's slave, and the woman and infant are presumed to be his wife and child.

George B. McClellan American major-general during the American Civil War

George Brinton McClellan was an American soldier, civil engineer, railroad executive, and politician. A graduate of West Point, McClellan served with distinction during the Mexican War (1846–1848), and later left the Army to work in railroads until the outbreak of the Civil War (1861–1865). Early in the war, McClellan was appointed to the rank of major general and played an important role in raising a well-trained and organized army, which would become the Army of the Potomac in the Eastern Theater; he served a brief period as general-in-chief of the Union Army. Although McClellan was meticulous in his planning and preparations, these very characteristics hampered his ability to challenge aggressive opponents in a fast-moving battlefield environment. He chronically overestimated the strength of enemy units and was reluctant to apply principles of mass, frequently leaving large portions of his army unengaged at decisive points.

Medal of Honor citation

Medal of honor old.jpg

Rank and Organization:

Drummer, Company E, 3d Vermont Infantry. Place and date. At Lees Mills, Va., April 16, 1862. Entered service at. Johnson, Vt. Birth: Johnson, Vt. Date of issue: February 1865.

Citation:

Crossed the creek under a terrific fire of musketry several times to assist in bringing off the wounded. [2] [3]

See also

Related Research Articles

Henry A. du Pont Union Army officer, United States Army Medal of Honor recipient, politician

Henry Algernon du Pont was an American military officer, businessman, and politician from Delaware. A member of the famed Du Pont family, he graduated first in his class from West Point shortly after the beginning of the American Civil War and served in the U.S. Army, earning the Medal of Honor for his actions during the Battle of Cedar Creek in October 1864.

Thomas Orville Seaver rose to the rank of Colonel in the U.S. Army during the American Civil War and received the Medal of Honor, America's highest military decoration, for his actions at the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. After the war Seaver was admitted to the Vermont bar and practiced law, serving as a judge for many years, until his death.

Lewis A. Grant United States Army Medal of Honor recipient

Lewis Addison Grant was a teacher, lawyer, soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War, and later United States Assistant Secretary of War. He was among the leading officers from the state of Vermont, and received the Medal of Honor for "personal gallantry and intrepidity."

Henry H. Bingham Union Army General and Medal of Honor recipient

Henry Harrison Bingham was a Union Army officer in the American Civil War, who received the United States Military's highest award for valor, the Medal of Honor, for his actions at the Battle of the Wilderness.

Stephen Thomas (Medal of Honor) United States Army Medal of Honor recipient, Union Army general

Stephen Thomas, manufacturer, politician, jurist, and Union Army officer. He was a recipient of the Medal of Honor for gallantry.

William W. Henry United States Army Medal of Honor recipient

William Wirt Henry was a manufacturer and a colonel in the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was a recipient of the brevet grade of brigadier general of volunteers and of the Medal of Honor for gallantry in action.

5th Vermont Infantry unit of the Union Army in the American Civil War

The 5th Regiment, Vermont Volunteer Infantry was a three years' infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

8th Vermont Infantry unit of the Union Army in the American Civil War

The 8th Regiment, Vermont Volunteer Infantry was a three-year infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It served in both major theaters, first in Louisiana and then in Virginia, from February 1862 to June 1865. It was a member of the XIX Corps.

The 10th Vermont Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Samuel E. Pingree United States Army Medal of Honor recipient

Samuel Everett Pingree was a lawyer, a U.S. politician of the Republican Party, and an American Civil War veteran who received the Medal of Honor.

Harry Jeremiah Parks was a United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military highest decoration—the Medal of Honor—for his actions in the American Civil War.

Charles Adams Hunter was a soldier in the American Civil War who received the Medal of Honor for valor in action.

George M. Love American Civil War Medal of Honor recipient

George Maltby Love was a colonel in the Union Army and a Medal of Honor recipient for his actions in the American Civil War.

Frederick A. Lyon American Civil War Medal of Honor recipient

Frederick A. Lyon was a soldier in the Union Army and a Medal of Honor recipient for his actions in the American Civil War.

Alexander Scott (Medal of Honor) Soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War, recipient of the Medal of Honor

Alexander Scott was a soldier in the Union Army during the American Civil War and a recipient of the Medal of Honor for his actions in the Battle of Monocacy, Maryland.

Amasa Tracy United States Army Medal of Honor recipient, Union Army general

Amasa Sawyer Tracy was a Union Army officer. He was a recipient of the Medal of Honor for gallantry.

Eri D. Woodbury Army Medal of Honor recipient

Eri Davidson Woodbury was a Union Army officer during the American Civil War. He received the Medal of Honor for gallantry during the Battle of Cedar Creek fought near Middletown, Virginia on October 19, 1864. The battle was the decisive engagement of Major General Philip Sheridan’s Valley Campaigns of 1864 and was the largest battle fought in the Shenandoah Valley.

James Sweeney (Medal of Honor) Recipient of the Medal of Honor

James Sweeney was a Union Army soldier during the American Civil War. He received the Medal of Honor for gallantry during the Battle of Cedar Creek fought near Middletown, Virginia on October 19, 1864. The battle was the decisive engagement of Major General Philip Sheridan's Valley Campaigns of 1864 and was the largest battle fought in the Shenandoah Valley.

John Wallace Scott Medal of Honor recipient

John Wallace Scott, also known as "J. Wallace Scott", was a United States soldier who fought with the Union Army as a member of several Pennsylvania infantry units during the American Civil War. Severely wounded during the Siege of Petersburg in 1864, he was recognized for his meritorious service less than eight months later with his nation's highest award for bravery, the U.S. Medal of Honor, for capturing the enemy's flag while serving as captain of Company D of the 157th Pennsylvania Infantry during the Battle of Five Forks, Virginia on April 1, 1865. That award was conferred on April 27, 1865.

References

  1. "Julian Scott". Claim to Fame: Medal of Honor recipients. Find a Grave . Retrieved 2007-11-08.
  2. ""Civil War Medal of Honor citations" (S-Z): Scott, Julian A". AmericanCivilWar.com. Retrieved 2007-11-09.
  3. "Medal of Honor website (M-Z): Scott, Julian A". army.mil. Archived from the original on 2009-02-23. Retrieved 2007-11-09.

Further reading

External sources