KSShch

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The KSShch (Russian : Корабельный снаряд «Щука» (КСЩ); [1] tr.:Korabelny snaryad Shchuka (KSShch); English: Shchuka Anti-Ship Missile, "Shchuka" pike in English) was a Soviet anti-ship cruise missile design that carried a nuclear warhead. Its GRAU designation is 4K32. It was sometimes referred to as P-1 Strela or Strelka (Little Arrow). It was used in the 1950s and 1960s. The missile's NATO reporting name was SS-N-1Scrubber. It was tested in 19531954 on the destroyer Bedovyy (Kildin-class) and entered service in 1955, being deployed on Kildin- and Krupnyy (later converted to Kanin)-class ships. It was fired from a heavy rail launcher SM-59, with an armoured hangar. As those ships were retrofitted and modernized between 1966 and 1977, the missiles were removed (in favor of the SS-N-2 on the Kildin class and an anti-aircraft/anti-submarine weapons suite on the Kanin class).

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Specifications

Operators

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References

  1. (in Russian) Black Sea Navy Archived 2012-02-07 at the Wayback Machine
  2. "MilitaryRussia.Ru — отечественная военная техника (после 1945г.) | Статьи".