Kallio

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Kallio

Berghäll
Helsinki districts-Kallio.png
Position of Kallio within Helsinki
CountryFlag of Finland.svg  Finland
Region Uusimaa
Sub-region Greater Helsinki
Municipality Helsinki
DistrictCentral
Subdivision regions Linjat, Siltasaari, Torkkelinmäki
Area
1.09 km2 (0.42 sq mi)
Population
 (2013)
27,051
  Density16,494/km2 (42,720/sq mi)
Postal codes
00500, 00530
Subdivision number11
Neighbouring subdivisions Sörnäinen, Linjat, Harju
Aerial view of central Kallio. Kallio from air.jpg
Aerial view of central Kallio.
Karhupuisto Karhupuisto Helsinki.jpg
Karhupuisto
Kallio Library (1912) Kallion kirjasto.jpg
Kallio Library (1912)
The Kallio church, designed by Lars Sonck and built in 1908-1912, represents the Finnish national romantic school of architecture, as well as a change to Art Nouveau. Kallio church, Helsinki 2004-06.jpg
The Kallio church, designed by Lars Sonck and built in 1908–1912, represents the Finnish national romantic school of architecture, as well as a change to Art Nouveau.

Kallio (Finnish:  [ˈkɑlːio] ; Swedish : Berghäll; literally "the rock") is a district and a neighbourhood in Helsinki, the capital of Finland, located on the eastern side of the Helsinki peninsula about one kilometre north from the city centre. It is one of the most densely populated areas in Finland. Kallio is separated from the city centre by the Siltasaarensalmi strait, over which is a bridge called Pitkäsilta ("long bridge"). Traditionally, the bridge symbolizes the divide between the affluent centre and the more working class areas around Kallio.

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After the forming of the new centre in the 19th century, the city expanded northward. The intense industrialization which began in the 1860s in Helsinki saw the construction of the industrial areas around Sörnäinen harbour and to the workers' district of Kallio, with the area becoming inhabited mostly by factory workers. However, most of the working-class families have long ago been replaced as the most typical Kallio residents by young adults and elderly people living alone, in a process which could be seen as some sort of gentrification. For many people who move into Helsinki from elsewhere in Finland, Kallio is the area where they first settle. Most flats are small, and rents are typically lower than elsewhere in central Helsinki, partly explaining the area's popularity among students and artists. The small flat sizes also mean that Kallio is expected to resist full gentrification. However, the rents have increased as the district has grown more popular and become an increasingly desirable area to live in.

Hakaniemi Market Hall (1914), is one of the three main market halls in Helsinki Hakaniemi market hall.jpg
Hakaniemi Market Hall (1914), is one of the three main market halls in Helsinki

Kallio (and Harju, which is often considered a part of Kallio) also has, more than any other district in Helsinki, a reputation as a "bohemian" and liberal area. The area has a heterogeneous population and many bars. The area also has a number of sex shops, strip clubs and massage parlors.

President Tarja Halonen was born in Kallio and lived there until she was elected president in 2000.

Street names

Five SE–NW streets of Kallio are named with Finnish ordinal numbers: Ensi linja, Toinen linja, Kolmas linja, Neljäs linja and Viides linja, meaning First Line, Second Line, Third Line, Fourth Line and Fifth Line, forming thus an example of numbered streets, rare in Europe and unique in Helsinki.

The SW–NE streets in the same area are named after Finnish scientists from the 18th and 19th century. Starting from South-east these include:

To the east, the Torkkelinmäki area also has:

Many of the streets on both sides of Helsinginkatu in the Kallio and Harju are named after Swedish kings and lords of the 16th and 17th century

See also

Coordinates: 60°11′03″N024°56′57″E / 60.18417°N 24.94917°E / 60.18417; 24.94917

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