Kandalama Reservoir

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Kandalama Reservoir
KandalamaReservoir-June2008-2.jpg
Northern region of the Kandalama Reservoir, as seen from Heritance Kandalama in June 2008.
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Red pog.svg
Location of Kandalama Reservoir in Sri Lanka
Country Sri Lanka
Location Kandalama
Coordinates 07°52′38″N80°42′00″E / 7.87722°N 80.70000°E / 7.87722; 80.70000 Coordinates: 07°52′38″N80°42′00″E / 7.87722°N 80.70000°E / 7.87722; 80.70000
Purpose Irrigation
StatusOperational
Owner(s)Mahaweli Authority
Dam and spillways
Type of dam Embankment dam
Height21 m (69 ft)
Length1,600 m (5,200 ft)
Spillway capacity33.3 million cu. Meters
Reservoir
Total capacity33,300,000 m3 (1.18×109 cu ft)
Catchment area 102 km2 (39.4 sq mi)
Maximum length4.8 km (3.0 mi)
Maximum width2.3 km (1.4 mi)

The Kandalama Reservoir (also erroneously known as the Kandalama Lake) is a reservoir in Kandalama, Sri Lanka. The reservoir is created by the 21 m (69 ft) high and 1,600 m (5,200 ft) wide Kandalama Dam. Water from the dam is used for irrigation purposes in the region, extending up to Kekirawa. [1] The tank was created by constructing a dam across one of the main tributaries of Kala Wewa - the Mirisgoniya River. During 1952 to 1957, the tank was rehabilitated by Department of Irrigation of Sri Lanka. [2] The reservoir and hotel is situated with the Kaludiya Pokuna Forest archeological site.

Contents

The reservoir measures 4.8 km (3.0 mi) and 2.3 km (1.4 mi) at its longest length and width respectively, with a catchment area of 102 km2 (39.4 sq mi) and a volume of 33,300,000 m3 (1.18×109 cu ft). Due to its scenic surroundings, and year-round water availability, the reservoir is a very popular tourist destination in Sri Lanka. [1] [3]

The reservoir during dry season. Kandalama Reservoir in dry season.jpg
The reservoir during dry season.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Kandalama Reservoir". DamSafety.lk. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2014.
  2. http://www.mysrilankaholidays.com/kandalama-wewa-reservoir.html
  3. Gamini Warushamana (16 September 2012). "Drought helps expedite renovation work on Kalawewa tank". Sunday Observer . Retrieved 18 January 2014.