Karl Kassulke

Last updated
Karl Kassulke
No. 29
Position: Safety
Personal information
Born:(1941-03-20)March 20, 1941
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Died:October 27, 2008(2008-10-27) (aged 67)
Eagan, Minnesota
Height:6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
Weight:195 lb (88 kg)
Career information
College: Drake
NFL Draft: 1963  / Round: 11 / Pick: 152
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Interceptions:19
INT yards:187
Player stats at NFL.com

Karl Otto Kassulke (March 20, 1941 October 26, 2008) was a professional American football player.

Kassulke graduated from Drake, where he starred as a safety. He played 10 seasons in the National Football League, all with the Minnesota Vikings. Kassulke started in Super Bowl IV, where he and teammate Earsell Mackbee missed a tackle on Otis Taylor on the final touchdown of the game, late in the third quarter. The next season, he was selected to the Pro Bowl.

On July 24, 1973, Kassulke suffered a motorcycle accident on the way to training camp that left him paralyzed from the waist down. [1] [2]

After his playing career, Kassulke worked with Wings Outreach, a Christian Ministry to the disabled. [3]

Kassulke was immortalized in NFL lore by NFL Films' official highlight film for Super Bowl IV. Kansas City Chiefs coach Hank Stram, who was wired for sound by NFL Films executive producer Ed Sabol, noted the confusion in the Vikings' defense due to the Chiefs' shifting offense and quipped, "Kassulke was running around there like it was a Chinese fire drill".

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References

  1. "Kassulke injured in crash". The Bulletin . July 25, 1973. p. 13. Retrieved October 7, 2018 via Google News.
  2. Zulgad, Judd; Reusse, Patrick (October 28, 2008). "Ex-Viking Karl Kassulke dies at 67". Star-Tribune . Archived from the original on October 23, 2009. Retrieved October 29, 2008.
  3. "Karl Kassulke Obituary". St. Paul Pioneer Press . October 29, 2008. Retrieved October 7, 2018 via Legacy.com.