Karl Philipp, Prince of Schwarzenberg

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Karl Philipp
Prince of Schwarzenberg
Karel Filip Schwarzenberg.jpg
Portrait of Karl Philipp
Born(1771-04-18)18 April 1771
Vienna, Austria
Died15 October 1820(1820-10-15) (aged 49)
Leipzig, Saxony
AllegianceFlag of Austria.svg  Archduchy of Austria
Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg  Austrian Empire
Years of service1789–1820
Rank Generalfeldmarschall
Battles/wars French Revolutionary Wars
Napoleonic Wars
Awards Order of the Golden Fleece
Military Order of Maria Theresa
Military Order of Max Joseph
Legion of Honour
Order of the Holy Spirit
Schwarzenberg Monument at Schwarzenbergplatz, Vienna, by Ernst Julius Hahnel Schwarzenberg monument Vienna June 2006 471.jpg
Schwarzenberg Monument at Schwarzenbergplatz, Vienna, by Ernst Julius Hähnel
Engraving from "Zweihundert deutsche Manner in Bildnissen und Lebensbeschreibungen", by Ludwig Bechstein, 1854 Karl philipp fuerst zu schwarzenberg.jpg
Engraving from "Zweihundert deutsche Männer in Bildnissen und Lebensbeschreibungen", by Ludwig Bechstein, 1854

Karl Philipp, Fürst zu Schwarzenberg (or Charles Philip, Prince of Schwarzenberg; 18/19 April 1771 15 October 1820) was an Austrian field marshal. [1]

Contents

Family

Portrait in uniform Prince Schwarzenberg.jpg
Portrait in uniform

Karl Philipp was born 18/19 April 1771 in Vienna, [2] the son of Johann Nepomuk Anton of Schwarzenberg and Marie Eleonore Countess of Öttingen-Wallerstein. He was one of thirteen siblings, seven of whom did not reach adulthood. [3]

Imperial service

Karl Philipp entered the imperial cavalry in 1788, fought in 1789 under Lacy and Loudon against the Turks, distinguished himself by his bravery, and became a major in 1792. [2] In the French campaign of 1793, he served in the advanced guard of the army commanded by Prince Josias of Coburg, and at Le Cateau-Cambrésis in 1794 his impetuous charge at the head of his regiment, vigorously supported by twelve British squadrons, broke a whole corps of the French, killed and wounded 3,000 men, and captured 32 of the enemy's guns. He was immediately decorated with the Knight's Cross of the Military Order of Maria Theresa. [4]

After taking part in the battles of Amberg and Würzburg in 1796 during the French Revolutionary Wars, he was raised to the rank of general-major, and, in 1799, he subsequently was promoted to Feldmarschall-Leutnant. At the Battle of Hohenlinden, he led a division in the right wing. [5] During the retreat, his promptitude and courage saved the right wing of the Austrian army from destruction, and he was afterwards entrusted by the Archduke Charles of Austria with the command of the rearguard. [4] In 1804, Prince Karl Philipp was created Fürst zu Schwarzenberg in a title identical to, but separate from, that of his brother, Joseph, Prince of Schwarzenberg. [3]

In the war of 1805 he held command of a division under Mack, and when Ulm was surrounded by Napoleon in October he was one of the band of cavalry, under the Archduke Ferdinand of Austria-Este, which cut its way through the hostile lines. In the same year, he received the Commander's Cross of the Order of Maria Theresa and in 1809 he was awarded the Order of the Golden Fleece. [4]

In 1806–1809, Schwarzenberg served as the Austrian ambassador to Russia. [2] Schwarzenburg returned to Austria in time to take part in the Battle of Wagram, leading a cavalry division in the Reserve Corps [6] and was soon afterwards promoted to general of cavalry. After the peace of Vienna, he was sent to Paris to negotiate the marriage between Napoleon and the Archduchess Marie Louise of Austria. [4] The prince gave a ball in honour of the bride on 1 July 1810, which ended in a fire that killed many of the guests, including his own sister-in-law, wife of his older brother, Joseph. [7]

Napoleon held Schwarzenberg in great esteem, and it was at his request that the prince took command of the Austrian auxiliary corps in the Russian campaign of 1812. The Austrian general won some minor victories against the Russians at Gorodetschna and Wolkowisk. Afterwards, under instructions from Napoleon, he remained for some months inactive at Pultusk. [8]

In 1813, when Austria, after many hesitations, took the side of the allies against Napoleon, Schwarzenberg, recently promoted to Feldmarschall, was appointed commander-in-chief of the allied Grand Army of Bohemia. As such, he was the senior of the allied generals who conducted the campaign of 1813–1814. [9] Under his command, the allied army was mauled by Napoleon at the Battle of Dresden on 26–27 August and driven back into Bohemia. However, his army defeated pursuing French forces at the Second Battle of Kulm. Returning to the fray, he led the Allied army north again and played a major role in Napoleon's decisive defeat at the Battle of Leipzig on 16–18 October. During the invasion of France in 1814, he beat a French force at the Battle of Bar-sur-Aube in late February. He repelled an attack by Napoleon in the Battle of Arcis-sur-Aube on 20–21 March and overcame the last barrier before Paris by winning the Battle of Fère-Champenoise on 25 March. His capture of the French capital on 31 March after the Battle of Paris resulted in the overthrow of Napoleon. [10]

The next year, during the Hundred Days when Napoleon escaped from Elba and regained the French throne, in the hostilities that followed Schwarzenberg commanded the Army of the Upper Rhine (an Austrian-allied army of about a quarter of a million men). [11] But shortly afterwards, having lost his sister Caroline, to whom he was deeply attached, he fell ill. A stroke disabled him in 1817, and in 1820, when revisiting Leipzig, the scene of the "Battle of the Nations" that he had directed seven years before, he suffered a second stroke. He died there on 15 October. [9]

Marriage and descendants

Coat of arms of the Schwarzenberg princes Schwarzenberg-Orlicky-Erb.png
Coat of arms of the Schwarzenberg princes

The Prince married the Countess Maria Anna von Hohenfeld (20 May 17671848), who was the widow of Prince Anton Esterhazy. They had three sons: [3]

Of Schwarzenberg's nephews, Felix Schwarzenberg, the statesman, was also notable, and Friedrich Johann Josef Coelestin (1809–1885) was a cardinal and a prominent figure in papal and Austrian history. [9]


Ancestry

Notes

  1. Regarding personal names: Fürst is a title, translated as Prince , not a first or middle name. The feminine form is Fürstin.
  2. 1 2 3 Tucker 2014, p. 673.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Biographisches Lexikon des Kaiserthums Oesterreich, Band: 33 (1877), ab Seite: 82.
  4. 1 2 3 4 Chisholm 1911, p. 390.
  5. Arnold 2005, p. 249.
  6. Bowden & Tarbox 1980, p. 167.
  7. Sir Walter Scott, The Edinburgh Annual Register, John Ballantyne and Company, 1812, Volume 1; Volume 3, Part 1, pp. 333334. The party included some 1200 guests, which was larger than the assembly room could hold, so a temporary building was formed of planks, which were hidden by gauze, muslin and other draperies. The draperies caught fire, and the whole room was enveloped. Princess Pauline Schwarzenburg, although she had initially escaped, ran back into the ball room in search of one of her daughters. Her body was only recognized by the diamonds she wore.
  8. Chisholm 1911, pp. 390–391.
  9. 1 2 3 Chisholm 1911, p. 391.
  10. Digby Smith. The Napoleonic Wars Data Book. London: Greenhill, 1998. ISBN   978-1853672767 pp. 443445, 455, 461465, 512514, 516517.
  11. Siborne 1895, p. 767.

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References

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