Kavrayskiy Hills

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The Kavrayskiy Hills ( 70°27′S161°5′E / 70.450°S 161.083°E / -70.450; 161.083 Coordinates: 70°27′S161°5′E / 70.450°S 161.083°E / -70.450; 161.083 ) are a line of mostly ice-covered coastal hills in Antarctica, rising south of Rennick Bay and along the west side of the lower end of Rennick Glacier. They were charted by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition (1958) and named after Vladimir V. Kavrayskiy, a Soviet geodesist and cartographer. [1]

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.

Rennick Bay is an embayment of the coastline at the terminus of Rennick Glacier. It is bounded on the west and east by Belousov Point and Stuhlinger Ice Piedmont. The eastern part of the bay was discovered from the ship Terra Nova, of the British Antarctic Expedition (1910–13) under Scott. Named by the British Antarctic Expedition for Lieutenant Henry E. de P. Rennick, Royal Navy, an officer on the Terra Nova. The bay was photographed by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump (1947) and by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition (1958).

Rennick Glacier is broad glacier, nearly 200 miles (320 km) long, which is one of the largest in Antarctica. It rises on the polar plateau westward of Mesa Range and is 20 to 30 miles wide, narrowing to 10 miles (16 km) near the coast. It takes its name from Rennick Bay where the glacier reaches the sea. The seaward part of the glacier was photographed by U.S. Navy (USN) Operation Highjump, 1946-47. The upper reaches of the Rennick Glacier were discovered and explored by the U.S. Victoria Land Traverse (VLT) in February 1960, and the first ascent made of Welcome Mountain by John Weihaupt, Alfred Stuart, Claude Lorius and Arnold Heine of the VLT party. On February 10, 1960, Lieutenant Commander Robert L. Dale, pilot of U.S. Navy (USN) Squadron VX-6, evacuated the VLT from 7238S, 16132E, on this glacier, and then conducted an aerial photographic reconnaissance to Rennick Bay on the coast before returning the VLT team to McMurdo Station.

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Queen Elizabeth Range (Antarctica) mountain range in Antarctica

The Queen Elizabeth Range is a rugged mountain range of the Transantarctic Mountains System, located in the Ross Dependency region of Antarctica.

Usarp Mountains

The Usarp Mountains is a major Antarctic mountain range, lying westward of the Rennick Glacier and trending N-S for about 190 kilometres (118 mi). The feature is bounded to the north by Pryor Glacier and the Wilson Hills. Its important constituent parts include Welcome Mountain, Mount Van der Hoeven, Mount Weihaupt, Mount Stuart, Mount Lorius, Smith Bench, Mount Roberts, Pomerantz Tableland, Daniels Range, Emlen Peaks, Helliwell Hills and Morozumi Range.

Znamenskiy Island is a high, nearly round, ice-covered island 2.5 miles (4.0 km) long, lying in Rennick Bay just north of the terminus of Rennick Glacier. Charted by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1958 and named for Soviet hydrographer K.I. Znamenskiy (1903–41).

Pryor Glacier is a glacier flowing northeastward, to the north of Mount Shields and Yermak Point, into Rennick Bay. The feature is about 30 nautical miles (60 km) long and forms a physical separation between Wilson Hills and Usarp Mountains. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1960-62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Madison E. Pryor, scientific leader at McMurdo Station (1959) and U.S. Exchange Scientist at the Soviet Mirny Station (1962).

Ant Hill is a hill on Antarctica, 1,310 metres (4,300 ft) high, rising steeply on the west side of the Skelton Glacier between Ant Hill Glacier and Dilemma Glacier. It was surveyed and named in 1957 by the New Zealand party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1956–58. Ant Hill was named by geological members because of the prominent anticline in the bluff below the hill.

The Caudal Hills are a group of hills situated within Victoria Land, Antarctica the hills lie between the Sequence Hills and the Lichen Hills on the western margin of upper Rennick Glacier. A series of spurs "tail" out to the north, hence the name "Caudal". They were so named by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition, 1962–63. The Caudal Hills lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Waring Bluff is a rock bluff in the north part of the Sequence Hills, Victoria Land. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-64. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for James T. Waring, U.S. Navy, an air controlman at McMurdo Station in 1967.

Kooperatsiya Ice Piedmont is an ice piedmont at the southwestern side of Yermak Point on the west shore of Rennick Bay, Antarctica. This area was photographed in 1958 by the 3rd Soviet Antarctic Expedition which gave the name "Zaliv Kooperatsiya" to the western portion of Rennick Bay, but the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names has retained the prior name Rennick Bay. For the sake of historical continuity, the name Kooperatsiya Ice Piedmont has been approved; it is named after the Kooperatsiya, the expedition ship used by the Soviet expedition in 1958.

Mount Dougherty is a mountain, 2,790 metres (9,150 ft) high, between Mount Sandved and Mount Cara on the main north-south ridge in the northern part of the Queen Elizabeth Range. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from tellurometer surveys and Navy air photos, 1960–62, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Ellsworth C. Dougherty, a United States Antarctic Research Program biologist at McMurdo Sound, 1959–60 and 1961–62.

Glover Cirque is a cirque occupied by a glacier in the south part of the Mount Boreas massif; the cirque is bounded on the northeast side by a ridge connecting Mount Boreas and Mount Thrace. It was named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (2004) after Robert P. Glover, cartographer, Geography Discipline, U.S. Geological Survey; five field seasons in Antarctica up to 2003–04.

Mount Lisicky is a peak, 2,120 metres (6,960 ft) high, standing 7 nautical miles (13 km) northwest of Mount Cocks in the Royal Society Range, Antarctica. It was mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and Navy air photos, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names in 1963 for Captain Joseph F. Lisicky, United States Marine Corps, a maintenance officer for U.S. Navy Operation Deep Freeze, 1960, who served several summers at McMurdo Station.

Mount Heine is a hill, 760 metres (2,490 ft) high, in the northern part of White Island, in the Ross Archipelago, Antarctica. It was named by the New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (1958–59) for A.J. Heine, the leader of their party who visited White Island. Heine, who climbed this hill, spent four summers and one winter in Antarctica, mostly in the McMurdo Sound area.

Serrat Glacier is a glacier, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long, flowing north through the middle of Kavrayskiy Hills into the west side of Rennick Glacier. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1960-62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Javier Serrat of the University of Chile, who worked at the United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) McMurdo Station, 1967-68.

Sequence Hills

Sequence Hills is an escarpment-like hills on the west margin of the upper Rennick Glacier, about 7 nautical miles (13 km) northwest of Caudal Hills, Victoria Land. They provided the only good geological sequence in the area. Mapped and named by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962-63.

Thompson Point is a point of land which descends northeastward from Kavrayskiy Hills into the west part of the terminus of Rennick Glacier. Mapped by United States Geological Survey (USGS) from surveys and U.S. Navy aerial photographs, 1960-62. Named by Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names (US-ACAN) for Max C. Thompson, United States Antarctic Research Program (USARP) biologist at McMurdo Station, 1966-67.

Vantage Hills is a small, escarpment-like hills located 5 nautical miles (9 km) west of the south end of Gair Mesa. The hills overlook the saddle of the Campbell Glacier with Rennick Glacier from the south, in Victoria Land. So named by the northern party of New Zealand Geological Survey Antarctic Expedition (NZGSAE), 1962–63, for their position of "vantage."

Law Glacier is a glacier about 10 nautical miles (20 km) wide between the south end of the Queen Elizabeth Range and the MacAlpine Hills, gradually descending east-northeast from the Antarctic polar plateau to Bowden Névé. It was named by the New Zealand party of the Commonwealth Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1956–58) for B.R. Law, Deputy-Chairman of the Ross Sea Committee.

Lewis Cliff is an irregular cliff, about 12 nautical miles (22 km) long, extending south from Mount Achernar along the west side of Walcott Neve, Antarctica. It was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Richard E. Lewis, a U.S. Navy Aviation Electronics Technician, who was injured during Operation Deep Freeze II, 1956–57.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Kavrayskiy Hills" (content from the Geographic Names Information System ).

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Geographic Names Information System geographical database

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States of America and its territories. It is a type of gazetteer. GNIS was developed by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the United States Board on Geographic Names (BGN) to promote the standardization of feature names.