Keihan Main Line

Last updated
Keihan Main Line
Number prefix Keihan lines.png
Keihan8000-newcolor.JPG
A Keihan 8000 series limited express in revised color scheme
Overview
Native name京阪本線
Owner Keihan Electric Railway
Locale Osaka Prefecture, Kyoto Prefecture
Termini Yodoyabashi
Sanjō
Service
Depot(s)Neyagawa, Yodo
History
Opened1910
Technical
Line length49.3 km (30.6 mi)
Number of tracks2 (Yodoyabashi - Temmabashi, Neyagawa - Sanjo)
4 (Temmabashi - Neyagawa)
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Electrification 1,500 V DC, overhead catenary
Operating speed110 km/h (70 mph)
Route map

Contents

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Nakanoshima Line
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Osaka Subway: Arrow Blue Left 001.svg Midōsuji Line Arrow Blue Right 001.svg
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0.0
Yodoyabashi
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Osaka Subway Arrow Blue Left 001.svg Sakaisuji Line Arrow Blue Right 001.svg
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0.5
Kitahama
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Arrow Blue Left 001.svgHigashi Yokobori River
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Arrow Blue Up 001.svgKeihan Line/Nakanoshima LineArrow Blue Right 001.svgArrow Blue Up 001.svg
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1.3
Temmabashi (second)
1963-
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Osaka Subway Arrow Blue Left 001.svg Tanimachi Line Arrow Blue Right 001.svg
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Temmabashi (first)
-1963
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Tosabori River
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Arrow Blue Left 001.svgNeya River
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Kyōbashi (first)
-1910
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Katamachi
-1969
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3.0
Kyōbashi
1969-
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Kyōbashi (Second)
-1969
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Gamo
abandoned in 1932
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Gamo Signal Box
-1970
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Yodogawa Freight Line
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Tatsumi Signal Box
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4.6
Noe (second)
1931-
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Noe (first)
-1931
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5.3
Sekime/
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Hanshin Expressway Route 12 Moriguchi Line
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6.2
Morishōji (second)
1931-
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Morishōji (first)
-1931
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6.8
Sembayashi
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7.2
Takii
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7.6
Doi
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8.3
Moriguchishi
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Moriguchi Depot and Workshop
-1972
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9.4
Nishisansō
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Kadoma
-1975
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Kinki Expressway
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10.1
Kadoma-shi
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10.8
Furukawabashi
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12.0
Ōwada
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12.8
Kayashima
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Neyagawa Depot and Workshop
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Neyagawa Signal Box
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15.0
Neyagawashi
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Toyono
abandoned in 1963
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17.6
Korien
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19.1
Kozenji
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20.8
Hirakata-koen
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21.8
Hirakatashi
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Amano River
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23.5
Goten-yama
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25.5
Makino
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27.7
Kuzuha
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30.1
Hashimoto
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31.8
Yawatashi
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Kizu River
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Keiji Bypass
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Uji River
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Yodo Depot
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35.3
Yodo
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Hanshin Expressway Route 8 Kyoto Line
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Horikawa River
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39.7
Chūshojima
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Uji River
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40.6
Fushimi-Momoyama
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bypass tracks removed
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41.3
Tambabashi
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bypass tracks removed
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42.3
Sumizome
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Nanase River
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43.3
Fujinomori
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44.1
Fukakusa /Fukakusa Depot
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44.6
Fushimi Inari
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Hanshin Expressway Route 8 Kyoto Line
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Inariyama Tunnel
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45.2
Tobakaidō
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46.1
Tōfukuji
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Shiokōji
closed in 1918, abandoned in 1955
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47.0
Shichijō
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Daibutsu-mae
abandoned in 1913
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47.7
Kiyomizu-Gojō
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48.6
Gion-Shijō
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Arrow Blue Up 001.svgKeihan Line/Arrow Blue Left 001.svg Keihan Keishin Line
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49.2
Sanjō
Arrow Blue Left 001.svgKeishin-Sanjō
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49.3
Sanjō
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Arrow Blue Down 001.svgŌtō Line
Arrow Blue Left 001.svgLake Biwa Canal
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50.3
Jingū-Marutamachi
BSicon HUBa.svg
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51.6
Demachiyanagi
BSicon HUBe.svg
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The Keihan Main Line (京阪本線, Keihan-honsen) is a railway line in Japan operated by Keihan Electric Railway. The line runs between Sanjō Station in Kyoto and Yodoyabashi Station in Osaka. There are through services to the Keihan Ōtō Line and the Keihan Nakanoshima Line. Trains from Kyoto to Osaka are treated as "down" trains, and from Osaka to Kyoto as "up" trains.

Train services

As of 20 August 2017, the following services are operated. [1]

Liner (ライナー, Liner) (Ln)
All cars reserved seating
Rapid Limited Express "Rakuraku" (快速特急"洛楽", Kaisoku Tokkyū "Rakuraku") (RLE)
Premium car is reserved seating only
Limited Express (特急, Tokkyū) (LE)
Premium car is reserved seating only
Commuter Rapid Express (通勤快急, Tsūkin Kaikyū) (CRE) - "down" trains only, on weekday mornings
Rapid Express (快速急行, Kaisoku Kyūkō) (RE)
Midnight Express (深夜急行, Shinya Kyūkō) (ME) - "up" trains only
A train departs from Yodoyabashi for Kuzuha at 0:20 a.m. and passes Moriguchishi and Hirakata-kōen.
Express (急行, Kyūkō) (Ex)
Commuter Sub-express (通勤準急, Tsūkin Junkyū) (CSbE) - "down" trains only, on weekday mornings
Trains are operated from Demachiyanagi, Kuzuha, Hirakatashi to Yodoyabashi or Nakanoshima in the morning and pass Moriguchishi.
Sub-express (準急, Junkyū) (SbE)
Semi-express (区間急行, Kukan Kyūkō) (SmE)
Local (普通, Futsū)
Trains stop at all stations.
Operation in non-rush hours per hour
Limited express: 6 round trips between Yodoyabashi and Demachiyanagi
Express: 3 round trips between Yodoyabashi and Kuzuha
Sub. express: 3 round trips between Yodoyabashi and Demachiyanagi
Local: 6 round trips between Nakanoshima and Kayashima, of which 3 extend to Demachiyanagi

Stations

Line nameStation numberStationSmESbECSbEExMERECRELERLELnTransfersLocation
Through sectionfrom Temmabashi:
L, SmE, SbE, CSbE, RE, CRE: to Nakanoshima on the Nakanoshima Line
Keihan Main LineKH01 Yodoyabashi (M)SSSSSSSSS Osaka Metro logo 2.svg Osaka Metro Midosuji line symbol.svg Osaka Metro Midosuji Line Chūō-ku, Osaka Osaka Prefecture
KH02 Kitahama SSSSSSSSS Osaka Metro logo 2.svg Osaka Metro Sakaisuji line symbol.svg Osaka Metro Sakaisuji Line
KH03 Temmabashi (M)SSSSSSSSSS
KH04 Kyōbashi (M)SSSSSSSSSS Miyakojima-ku, Osaka
KH05 Noe |||||| Jōtō-ku, Osaka
KH06 Sekime |||||| Osaka Metro logo 2.svg Osaka Metro Imazatosuji line symbol.svg Osaka Metro Imazatosuji Line (Sekime-Seiiku)
KH07 Morishōji |||||| Asahi-ku, Osaka
KH08 Sembayashi ||||||
KH09 Takii |||||| Moriguchi
KH10 Doi ||||||
KH11 Moriguchi-shi (M)SSSS||
KH12 Nishisansō S||||| Kadoma
KH13 Kadoma-shi S||||| Osaka Monorail Main Line
KH14 Furukawabashi S|||||
KH15 Ōwada S|||||
KH16 Kayashima (M)SSS|||| Neyagawa
KH17 Neyagawashi SSSSSSS||
KH18 Kōrien (M)SSSSSSS||
KH19 Kōzenji SSS|||| Hirakata
KH20 Hirakata-kōen SSSS|||
KH21 Hirakatashi (M)SSSSSSSS| Keihan Katano Line
KH22 Gotenyama SSS||||
KH23 Makino SSS||||
KH24 Kuzuha (M)SSSSSSSS|S
KH25 Hashimoto SS|||| Yawata Kyoto Prefecture
KH26 Iwashimizu-hachimangū (M)SSS|||
KH27 Yodo (Kyoto Racecourse) (M)SSs|s| Fushimi-ku, Kyoto
KH28 Chūshojima (M)SSSSSS| Keihan Uji Line
KH29 Fushimi-Momoyama SS||||
KH30 Tambabashi (M)SSSSSS| Kintetsu Kyoto Line (Kintetsu-Tambabashi)
KH31 Sumizome SS||||
KH32 Fujinomori SS||||
KH33 Ryūkokudai-mae-fukakusa (M)SS||||
KH34 Fushimi-Inari SSS|||
KH35 Toba-kaidō SS|||| Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto
KH36 Tōfukuji SS|||| JR logo (west).svg   D   JR West Nara Line
KH37 Shichijō SSSSSSS
KH38 Kiyomizu-Gojō SSS|||
KH39 Gion-Shijō SSSSSSS Hankyu Kyoto Main Line (Kyoto-kawaramachi)
KH40 Sanjō (M)SSSSSSS Kyoto MTB Logo.svg Subway KyotoTozai.png Kyoto Municipal Subway Tozai Line (Sanjō Keihan)
Ōtō Line
KH41 Jingū-Marutamachi SSS||| Sakyō-ku, Kyoto
KH42 Demachiyanagi (M)SSSSSSS

Keihan Katano Line

Keihan Katano Line
Number prefix Keihan lines.png
Keihan 10000 series 10051 Katanoshi Station.jpg
A Keihan 10000 series EMU on the Keihan Katano Line
Overview
Native name京阪交野線
Owner Keihan Electric Railway
Locale Osaka Prefecture
Termini Hirakatashi
Kisaichi
Stations8
Service
Type Commuter rail
History
Opened10 July 1929
Technical
Line length6.9 km (4.3 mi)
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Minimum radius 162 m
Electrification 1,500 V DC, overhead catenary
Operating speed90 km/h (55 mph)
Route map
BSicon tKHSTa.svg
BSicon tABZg+r.svg
Arrow Blue Left 001.jpeg
Keihan Main Line Arrow Blue Down 001.jpeg / Nakanoshima Line Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg
BSicon tHST.svg
BSicon tSTRe.svg
BSicon STR+l.svg
BSicon ABZgr.svg
Arrow Blue Up 001.jpeg Keihan Main Line
BSicon BHF.svg
BSicon BHF.svg
0.0 Hirakatashi
BSicon STR.svg
BSicon STRl.svg
Keihan Main Line
Arrow Blue Right 001.jpeg
BSicon BHF.svg
1.0 Miyanosaka
BSicon BHF.svg
1.7 Hoshigaoka
BSicon BHF.svg
2.5 Murano
BSicon BHF.svg
3.4 Kōzu
BSicon BHF.svg
4.4 Katano-shi
BSicon STRq.svg
BSicon KRZo.svg
BSicon BHFq.svg
BSicon eBHF.svg
5.9Keihanshin Iwafune
abandoned in 1948
BSicon eDST.svg
Mori Signal Box
1987 - 1992
BSicon BHF.svg
6.1 Kawachi-Mori
BSicon KBHFe.svg
6.9 Kisaichi

The Keihan Katano Line (京阪交野線, Keihan Katano-sen) is a 6.9 km railway line in northern Osaka Prefecture, Japan, operated by the private railway company Keihan Electric Railway. It connects Hirakatashi Station on the Keihan Main Line with Kisaichi Station. [2]

Operation

All trains stop at all stations. There is no through service to the Keihan Main Line.

Until March 15, 2013, several trains going through to the Keihan Main Line were operated on weekdays as rapid trains. They were named "Hikoboshi" and "Orihime,” unlike other Keihan line rapid trains which were not named.

Rapid Express (快速急行, Kaisoku Kyūkō)
Operated weekday nights, from Nakanoshima for Kisaichi, stopped at Watanabebashi, Ōebashi and Naniwabashi on the Nakanoshima Line, then Temmabashi, Kyōbashi, Moriguchishi, Neyagawashi, Kōrien and Hirakatashi on the Keihan Main Line, and all stations on the Katano Line
Commuter Rapid Express (通勤快急, Tsūkin Kaikyū)
Operated weekday mornings, from Kisaichi for Nakanoshima, stopped at all stations on the Katano Line to Hirakatashi, then Kōrien, Neyagawashi, Kyōbashi and Temmabashi on the Keihan Main Line, then Naniwabashi, Ōebashi and Watanabebashi on the Nakanoshima Line

Stations

All stations are in Osaka Prefecture.

No.StationJapaneseDistanceLocation
KH21 Hirakatashi 枚方市0.0 Hirakata
KH61 Miyanosaka 宮之阪1.0
KH62 Hoshigaoka 星ヶ丘1.7
KH63 Murano 村野2.5
KH64 Kōzu 郡津3.4 Katano
KH65 Katano-shi 交野市4.4
KH66 Kawachi-Mori 河内森6.1
KH67 Kisaichi 私市6.9

Rolling stock

Trains on the line are formed as 4- or 5-car electric multiple unit (EMU) sets.

Former

Keihan Uji Line

Keihan Uji Line
Keihan 13001 Uji Line 20120414.jpg
A 13000 series train on the Uji Line in April 2012
Overview
Native name京阪宇治線
Owner Keihan Electric Railway
Locale Kyoto Prefecture
Termini Chushojima
Uji
Stations8
Service
Depot(s)Neyagawa, Yodo
History
Opened1 June 1913 (1913-06-01)
Technical
Line length7.6 km (4.7 mi)
Number of tracksdouble tracks
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in) standard gauge
Minimum radius 200 m
Electrification 1,500 V DC overhead wire
Operating speed80 km/h (50 mph)

The Keihan Uji Line (京阪宇治線, Keihan Uji-sen) is a 7.6-km long commuter rail line in Kyoto, Japan, operated by the Keihan Electric Railway. It connects Chushojima Station on the Keihan Main Line in Fushimi, Kyoto and Uji Station in Uji, Kyoto, forming an alternative route to JR West's Nara Line. Only "Local" (all-stations) trains are operated on this line.

Stations and connections

No.StationJapaneseDistance (km)TransfersLocation
KH28 Chūshojima 中書島0.0 KH  Keihan Main Line Fushimi-ku, Kyoto
KH71 Kangetsukyō 観月橋0.7
KH72 Momoyama-minamiguchi 桃山南口2.3
KH73 Rokujizō 六地蔵3.1
KH74 Kowata 木幡3.9 Uji
KH75 Ōbaku 黄檗5.4 D  Nara Line
KH76 Mimurodo 三室戸7.2
KH77 Uji 宇治7.6

Rolling stock

New 13000 series four-car electric multiple unit (EMU) trains were introduced on the line from April 2012, replacing the earlier 2600 series EMUs. [3]

Keihan Ōtō Line

Keihan Ōtō Line
Number prefix Keihan lines.png
Keihan 2600 Series at Jingu-marutamachi Station.JPG
Keihan 2600 series EMU at Jingū-Marutamachi Station
Overview
Native name京阪鴨東線
Owner Keihan Electric Railway
Locale Kyoto
Termini Sanjō
Demachiyanagi
Stations3
History
Opened5 October 1989
Technical
Line length2.3 km (1.4 mi)
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Electrification 1,500 V DC, overhead catenary
Operating speed90 km/h (55 mph)

The Ōtō Line (鴨東線, Ōtō-sen) is a railway line in Kyoto that was opened on 5 October 1989 by the Keihan Electric Railway. The Ōtō Line re-established a rail connection between the Keihan Main Line and the Eizan Electric Railway, which had been severed when the Kyoto City streetcars ceased running in 1978. The line is operated as an extension of the Keihan Main Line. All trains continue into the Keihan Main Line and Keihan Nakanoshima Line in Osaka.

The double-track line is situated below Kawabata Street, along the left (eastern) bank of the Kamo River. Despite its length of 2.3 km, it serves as an important transport corridor in central Kyoto.

Stations

No.StationJapaneseDistance (km)TransfersLocation
KH40 Sanjō 三条0.0 Subway KyotoTozai.png Tozai Line (Sanjō Keihan) Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto
KH41 Jingū-Marutamachi 神宮丸太町1.0 Sakyō-ku, Kyoto
KH42 Demachiyanagi 出町柳2.3 Eizan Electric Railway Main Line

Keihan Nakanoshima Line

Keihan Nakanoshima Line
Keihan Nakanoshima station platform - panoramio (5).jpg
Nakanoshima Station platforms, October 2008
Overview
Native name中之島線
StatusOperational
OwnerNakanoshima High Speed Railway Company
Locale Osaka
Termini Temmabashi
Nakanoshima
Stations5
Service
Type Commuter rail
System Keihan Electric Railway
Operator(s) Keihan Electric Railway
Depot(s)none
History
Opened19 October 2008
Technical
Line length3.0 km (1.9 mi)
Number of tracks2
Track gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 12 in)
Electrification 1,500 V DC, overhead catenary

The Keihan Nakanoshima Line (京阪中之島線, Keihan Nakanoshima-sen) is a railway line operated by the Keihan Electric Railway in Osaka, Japan. It opened on 19 October 2008, and has a ruling grade of 1 in 25 (4%).

Services

The following services operate on the Nakanoshima line, with through-running to/from the Keihan Main Line. All services stop at all stations on the Nakanoshima line. [4]

Stations

Station numberStation nameDistance (km)Location
KH54 Nakanoshima
(Osaka International Convention Center)
0.0 Kita-ku, Osaka
KH53 Watanabebashi 0.9
KH52 Ōebashi 1.4
KH51 Naniwabashi 2.0
KH03 Temmabashi 3.0 Chūō-ku, Osaka

Rolling stock

History

Keihan Main Line

The Temmabashi to Kiyomizu-Gojo section opened as dual track, electrified at 1,500 V DC, in 1910, and was extended to Sanjo in 1915. The Temmabashi to Yodoyabashi section opened in 1963.[ citation needed ]

Keihan Katano Line

The line was built and opened by an independent railway company, Shigi-Ikoma Electric Railway (信貴生駒電鉄, Shigi Ikoma Dentetsu) in 1929.[ citation needed ] The company aimed to build a line to connect its main line, the present-day Ikoma Line, but cancelled the plan for financial reasons, and transferred the operation to Keihan. The operator was renamed Katano Electric Railway (交野電気鉄道, Katano Denki Tetsudō) in 1939, Keihanshin Express Electric Railway (京阪神急行電鉄, Keihanshin Kyūkō Dentetsu) in May 1945, and Keihan Electric Railway on 1 December 1949. [2]

From 9 June 2012, new 13000 series 4-car EMUs were introduced on the line. [5]

Keihan Ōtō Line

29 August 1924: Kyoto Electric Light (predecessor of the Keifuku Electric Railway) acquired a license for laying local railways between Demachiyanagi and Sanjo.

10 April 1950: Keihan Electric Railway established the Ōtō Line Construction Preparation Committee.

1 July 1972: Kamogawa Electric Railway was established.

20 February 1974: Provincial railway laying licence between the Keifuku Electric Railway

25 February 1974: Kamogawa Electric Railway acquires a license for laying a local railway between Demachiyanagi and Sanjo.

30 November 1984: A groundbreaking ceremony was held at the Ōtō Line construction work.

1 April 1989: Keihan Electric Railway merges with Kamogawa Electric Railway.

5 October 1989: Opened as Ōtō Line. The timetable revision accompanying this has been carried out ahead of 27 September, until noon 5 October was operated as a forwarding train in the Ōtō Line.

19 October 2008: Because there is a station of the same name on the Kyoto Municipal Subway Karasuma Line, the Marutamachi Station of this line is renamed to Jingu-Marutamachi Station.

5 December 2015: ATS operation begins on the Ōtō Line

Keihan Uji Line

The line opened on 1 June 1913, electrified at 600 V DC. [6]

The voltage on the line was raised to 1,500 V DC in December 1983. [6]

Keihan Nakanoshima Line

See also

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References

This article incorporates material from the corresponding article in the Japanese Wikipedia.

  1. (in Japanese)
  2. 1 2 Terada, Hirokazu (19 January 2013). データブック日本の私鉄[Databook: Japan's Private Railways] (in Japanese). Japan: Neko Publishing. pp. 132, 275. ISBN   978-4-7770-1336-4.
  3. 新型車両13000系20両を新造します。 [20 New 13000 Series Cars to be Built](PDF). News Release (in Japanese). Japan: Keihan Electric Railway. 12 December 2011. Retrieved 12 December 2011.
  4. Tetsudō Daiya Jōhō Magazine, November 2008 issue: "中之島線開業にともなう新ダイヤの概要", p. 14-17
  5. 京阪13000系,交野線で営業運転開始 [Keihan 13000 series enter service on Katano Line]. Japan Railfan Magazine Online (in Japanese). Japan: Koyusha Co., Ltd. 10 June 2012. Retrieved 10 June 2012.
  6. 1 2 Terada, Hirokazu (19 January 2013). データブック日本の私鉄[Databook: Japan's Private Railways] (in Japanese). Japan: Neko Publishing. p. 275. ISBN   978-4-7770-1336-4.
  7. Keihan press release: "中之島線内で習熟訓練運転を開始しました" (Nakanoshima Driver Training Starts), (1 August 2008) Archived 19 July 2011 at the Wayback Machine . Retrieved on 24 October 2008. (in Japanese)