Keith Barnes

Last updated

Keith Barnes
Personal information
Full nameWilliam Keith Barnes
Born (1934-10-30) 30 October 1934 (age 86)
Port Talbot, Wales, United Kingdom
Playing information
Height5 ft 10 in (178 cm) [1]
Weight11 st 10 lb (74 kg) [1]
Position Fullback
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1953–54Wollongong
1955–68 Balmain 1941174211519
Total1941174211519
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1956–63 New South Wales 122540114
1957–58 NSW City Firsts 2016032
1957–66 Australia 170540108
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
196768 Balmain 452721660
1983 Balmain 1100100
Total462821661
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
1960 Australia 430175
Source: [2] [3]

William Keith Barnes AM (born 30 October 1934), also known by the nickname of "Golden Boots", is a Welsh-born Australian former rugby league footballer who played in the 1950s and 1960s, and coached in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s. He was a fullback for the Australian national team and for the Balmain Tigers. He played in 14 Tests between 1959 and 1966, as national captain on 12 occasions. He was known as "Golden Boots" due to his exceptional goal-kicking ability. After his playing days he became a referee and later co-commentated on the Amco Cup on Network Ten with Ray Warren in the 1970s. He is considered one of the nation's finest footballers of the 20th century. [4]

Contents

Background

Barnes was born in Port Talbot, Wales.

Early years

Barnes' family originally emigrated at age 15 to Australia in 1948 to Wollongong where Barnes learnt the game at Wollongong High School. He was graded by the Wollongong club at age 19 as a half-back and in 1954 represented for Country and in a Southern Districts side against the touring Great Britain Lions. [5]

Club career

In 1955 he was signed by Norm "Latchem" Robinson to join the Balmain Tigers and moved to the district and straight into first grade, never playing a single lower grade game in the following 14 seasons. [6] The following year he played in the first of three Grand Finals against the St George Dragons at the beginning of their long premiership reign. On three occasions 1956, 1964 and 1966 Keith Barnes would experience defeat in a premiership decider – the latter two as captain.

Barnes quickly became known for his deadly accurate goal-kicking and would often kick penalties from the further side of the 50-yard line. He once kicked eleven goals in a club match.

In 1966 he overtook Ron Willey's record for the most points scored in an NSWRFL career (1,288); Barnes' eventual total of 1,519 stood as the new career record for seven seasons until it was bettered by Eric Simms in 1973. Barnes' tally of 1,519 points for Balmain placed him (as of 2017) 19th on the all-time list of club pointscorers.

In his final playing year with Balmain in 1967, Barnes was captain-coach. He returned briefly for some match appearances in 1968 when the club's playing roster was depleted by injury.

Representative career

Barnes made his debut for New South Wales in 1956. His international debut was in the 1957 World Cup. He broke his cheekbone in the opening match of the series but stayed on field to kick five goals.

He made his Test debut against New Zealand in Brisbane in the second Test of the 1959 trans-Tasman series enjoying the rare distinction of captaining his country in his first Test appearance. He kicked seven goals in that outing and stayed on as fullback, goal kicker and captain for the third Test. He was then selected as captain for the 1959 Kangaroo tour and played as captain in all six Test matches and sixteen minor tour matches, kicking 101 goals on the tour. At the tail-end of the trip he appeared in two promotional games against Italy.

In 1960, Barnes led Australia in all three Tests of a domestic series against France. He enjoys the record of six career Test appearances against France, all as captain, for four wins, 1 draw and a loss. In the Brisbane second Test 55–6 victory Barnes kicked a Test record of 10 goals. He was then selected as captain-coach of the 1960 World Cup squad played in England. He appeared in Australia's second and third matches of the tournament with his representative rival Brian Carlson doing the goal-kicking.

Barnes returned to national honours in the second Test of the 1962 domestic series against Great Britain, his final Test as captain. Thereafter Australian selectors enjoyed a surfeit of talented young fullbacks to choose from and Ken Thornett and Les Johns were regularly selected until Graeme Langlands later became the incumbent. In 1966 however Barnes made two final representative appearances in the first and second Tests of the domestic Ashes series. He scored all of Australia's points in the second Test victory. Injury saw Les Johns take Barnes' spot for the third and he would not regain it.

Post playing

Barnes retired from competitive rugby league in 1968 having made seventeen appearances for his adopted country and 234 appearances for the Tigers in which he averaged four goals per game. After three unsuccessful Grand Final outings during his time, the Tigers ironically won their first premiership in twenty-one years in Barnes' first year after retirement – 1969.

He continued an active role in rugby league and in 1976 became Secretary-Manager of the Balmain Leagues Club and in 1984 took up the role of Chief Executive of the football club. Barnes was the first ex-Kangaroo captain to manage the Australian side on the 1990 Kangaroo tour. At the turn of the century Barnes was honoured with selection in the Balmain's 'Team of the Century' and in the Wests Tigers' 'Team of the Century'. The yearly award for the best back at the Wests Tigers club is named the Keith Barnes Medal in his honour. [7]

In 2007 he was inducted into the Australian Rugby League Hall of Fame. [8] In February 2008, Barnes was named in the list of Australia's 100 Greatest Players (1908–2007) which was commissioned by the NRL and ARL to celebrate the code's centenary year in Australia. [9]

On 26 January 1996, he was named a Member of the Order of Australia in "recognition service to rugby league as a player and administrator". [10] On 24 October 2000, he was awarded the Australian Sports Medal for his rugby league achievements. [11]

In 2009 Barnes was honoured with the naming of the Keith Barnes Stand at Leichhardt Oval, the Balmain Tigers' home ground. [12]

Representative matches played

TeamMatchesYearsPoints
New South Wales121959–1963114
Australia (Tests)141957–1966108
Australia (World Cup)31957&196010

Sources

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References

  1. 1 2 "1960 World Cup Match". i.ebayimg.com. ebay. Retrieved 14 September 2016.
  2. RLP
  3. Century's Top 100 Players Archived 25 February 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  4. Pollard, Jack (1965). Gregory's Guide to Rugby League. Australia: Grenville Publishing. p152.
  5. ARL (2007). "Australian Rugby Football League Annual Report 2007" (PDF). Australian Rugby League Limited. p. 49. Archived from the original (PDF) on 13 September 2009. Retrieved 15 July 2009.
  6. Wayne Cousins. "ELLIS NAMED PLAYER OF THE YEAR". weststigers.com.au. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 3 April 2010.
  7. Australian Rugby League Hall of Fame Archived 18 May 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  8. "Centenary of Rugby League – The Players". NRL & ARL . 23 February 2008. Archived from the original on 26 February 2008. Retrieved 23 February 2008.
  9. "Keith Barnes AM". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet . Retrieved 26 January 2012.
  10. "Keith Barnes". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet . Retrieved 26 January 2012.
  11. Massoud, Josh (11 June 2009). "Tigers stand plan takes hit". The Daily Telegraph . Retrieved 26 May 2013.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Harry Bath
1961–1966
Coach
Balmain colours.svg
Balmain

1967–1968
Succeeded by
Leo Nosworthy
1969–1973
Preceded by
Clive Churchill
1959-1960
Coach
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia

1960
Succeeded by
Brian Carlson
1961
Preceded by
Brian Carlson
Captain
Flag of Australia (converted).svg
Australia

1959-62
Succeeded by
Barry Muir
Preceded by
Ron Willey
1962
Record-holder
Most points in an NSWRFL career [1]

1966 (1,289) - 1973 (1,519)
Succeeded by
Eric Simms
1973
  1. Heads, Ian and Middleton, David (2008) A Centenary of Rugby League, MacMillan Sydney