Kemari

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A game of Kemari at Tanzan Shrine Kemari Matsuri at Tanzan Shrine 2.jpg
A game of Kemari at Tanzan Shrine

Kemari (Japanese : 蹴鞠) is a ball game that was popular in Japan during the Heian Period. Kemari has been revived in modern times.

Japanese is an East Asian language spoken by about 128 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance.

A ball is a round object with various uses. It is used in ball games, where the play of the game follows the state of the ball as it is hit, kicked or thrown by players. Balls can also be used for simpler activities, such as catch or juggling. Balls made from hard-wearing materials are used in engineering applications to provide very low friction bearings, known as ball bearings. Black-powder weapons use stone and metal balls as projectiles.

Contents

History

The first evidence of kemari is from 644 AD. [1] The rules were standardized from the 13th century. [1] The game was influenced by the Chinese sport of Cuju . [2] The characters for Kemari are the same as Cuju in Chinese. The sport was introduced to Japan about 600, during the Asuka period. Nowadays, it is played in Shinto shrines for festivals. [2] George H. W. Bush played the game on one of his presidential visits to Japan. [3] [4]

China Country in East Asia

China, officially the People's Republic of China (PRC), is a country in East Asia and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion. Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area. Governed by the Communist Party of China, the state exercises jurisdiction over 22 provinces, five autonomous regions, four direct-controlled municipalities, and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau.

Cuju Chinese competitive ball game, dated to the Han Dynasty

Cuju or Ts'u-chü is an ancient Chinese football game, also played in Korea, Japan and Vietnam. It is a competitive game that involves kicking a ball through an opening into a net. The use of hands is not allowed. Invented in the Han Dynasty, it is recognized by FIFA as the earliest form of association football for which there is evidence, being first mentioned as an exercise in a Chinese military work from 3rd–2nd century BC.

Asuka period historical period of Japan, from 538 to 710 (or 592 to 645), its beginning is said to overlap with the preceding Kofun period. The Yamato polity evolved greatly during this period, named after the Asuka region, ~25 km south of modern city of Nara.

The Asuka period was a period in the history of Japan lasting from 538 to 710, although its beginning could be said to overlap with the preceding Kofun period. The Yamato polity evolved greatly during the Asuka period, which is named after the Asuka region, about 25 km south of the modern city of Nara.

Description

A game of Kemari at Tanzan Shrine Kemari Matsuri at Tanzan Shrine 1.jpg
A game of Kemari at Tanzan Shrine

It is a non-competitive sport. [5] The object of Kemari is to keep one ball in the air, [2] with all players cooperating to do so. Players may use any body part with the exception of arms and hands – their head, feet, knees, back, and depending on the rules, elbows to keep the ball aloft. The ball, known as a Mari, is made of deerskin with the hair facing inside and the hide on the outside. The ball is stuffed with barley grains to give it shape. When the hide has set in this shape, the grains are removed from the ball, and it is then sewn together using the skin of a horse. The one who kicks the ball is called a mariashi. A good mariashi makes it easy for the receiver to control the mari, and serves it with a soft touch to make it easy to keep the mari in the air.

Kemari is played on a flat ground, about 6–7 meters squared. [1] The uniforms that the players wear are reminiscent of the clothes of the Asuka age and include a crow hat. This type of clothing was called kariginu and it was fashionable at that time.

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Allen Guttmann, Lee Austin Thompson (2001). Japanese sports: a history. University of Hawaii Press. pp. 26–27. ISBN   9780824824648 . Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  2. 1 2 3 Witzig, Richard (2006). The Global Art of Soccer. CusiBoy Publishing. p. 5. ISBN   9780977668809 . Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  3. Wines, Michael (1992-01-07). "On Japan Leg of Journey, Bush's Stakes Are High". The New York Times.
  4. Wines, Michael (1992-01-08). "Japanese Visit, on the Surface: Jovial Bush, Friendly Crowds". The New York Times.
  5. "History of Football". FIFA. Retrieved 29 April 2013.