Ken Buehler

Last updated
Ken Buehler
Personal information
Born (1919-11-19) November 19, 1919 (age 98)
Listed height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)
Listed weight 185 lb (84 kg)
Career information
High school Edgar (Edgar, Wisconsin)
College Milwaukee (1939–1942)
Playing career 1942–1946
Position Forward / Center
Career history
1942–1943 Sheboygan Red Skins
1946 Sheboygan Red Skins
1946 Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons
Career highlights and awards
  • NBL champion (1943)
  • NBL Rookie of the Year (1943)

Kenneth Leslie "Ken" Buehler (born November 19, 1919) was an American professional basketball player for the Sheboygan Red Skins and the Fort Wayne Zollner Pistons. He played in two seasons for the Red Skins and, after serving in the United States Navy [1] in World War II, Buehler returned to professional basketball and played in eight games for the Pistons. [2] [3] During the 1942–43 season, the Red Skins won the National Basketball League (NBL) championship with Buehler as their third-leading scorer. [3] He averaged 7.5 points per game and was also named that season's NBL Rookie of the Year. [4] [5]

Upon returning from the war, Buehler played for Sheboygan in three games late in the 1945–46 season. [3] The following season, he played in only eight games for Fort Wayne before retiring from professional basketball due to a knee problem. [3] He then attended Marquette University's dental school and became a dentist in his post-basketball career. [6] Buehler eventually retired and moved to South Palm Beach, Florida. [3]

References

  1. "Hall of Fame" . Retrieved 16 December 2017.
  2. "Ken Buehler". Just Sports Stats. 2014. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 Gaynor, Brian (November 27, 2007). "Ken Buehler: Sheboygan Red Skins". Sheboygan Press. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  4. "Ken Buehler NBL Stats". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  5. "NBL Rookie of the Year Award Winners". basketball-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved June 27, 2014.
  6. Huebsch, Allen and Jane (1998). "Edgar: An Illustrated History, 1898–1998" . Retrieved June 27, 2014.