Ken Fletcher

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Ken Fletcher
Kenneth Norman Fletcher.jpg
Ken Fletcher at tournament in Santpoort, Netherlands (1965)
Full nameKenneth Norman Fletcher
Country (sports)Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
Born(1940-06-15)15 June 1940
Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Died11 February 2006(2006-02-11) (aged 65)
Brisbane, QLD, Australia
Turned pro1968 (amateur tour from 1958)
Retired1973
PlaysRight-handed (1-handed backhand)
Singles
Career record55–31
Highest rankingNo. 10 (1966, Lance Tingay ) [1]
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open F (1963)
French Open QF (1963, 1966)
Wimbledon QF (1962, 1966, 1967)
US Open 3R (1963)
Doubles
Career record6–5
Highest rankingNo. 1 (1964)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open F (1963, 1964)
French Open W (1964)
Wimbledon W (1966)
Mixed doubles
Grand Slam Mixed Doubles results
Australian Open W (1963, 1964)
French Open W (1963, 1964, 1965)
Wimbledon W (1963, 1965, 1966, 1968)
US Open W (1963)
Last updated on: 14 September 2012.

Kenneth Norman Fletcher (15 June 1940 – 11 February 2006) was an Australian tennis player who won numerous doubles and mixed doubles Grand Slam titles.

Tennis ball sport with racket and net

Tennis is a racket sport that can be played individually against a single opponent (singles) or between two teams of two players each (doubles). Each player uses a tennis racket that is strung with cord to strike a hollow rubber ball covered with felt over or around a net and into the opponent's court. The object of the game is to maneuver the ball in such a way that the opponent is not able to play a valid return. The player who is unable to return the ball will not gain a point, while the opposite player will.

Contents

Biography

He was born in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia to parents Norm and Ethel Fletcher. He was educated at St Laurence's College and showed early promise as a championship tennis player there. His greatest success as a tennis player came in 1963, when he became the only man to win a calendar year Grand Slam in mixed doubles, partnering fellow Australian Margaret Court. [2] He reached the final of the Australian Open in 1963, losing to Roy Emerson. [3]

Brisbane capital city of Queensland, Australia

Brisbane is the capital of and the most populated city in the Australian state of Queensland, and the third most populous city in Australia. Brisbane's metropolitan area has a population of 2.5 million, and the South East Queensland region, centred on Brisbane, encompasses a population of more than 3.5 million. The Brisbane central business district stands on the historic European settlement and is situated inside a peninsula of the Brisbane River, about 15 kilometres from its mouth at Moreton Bay. The metropolitan area extends in all directions along the floodplain of the Brisbane River Valley between Moreton Bay and the Great Dividing Range, sprawling across several of Australia's most populous local government areas (LGAs)—most centrally the City of Brisbane, which is by far the most populous LGA in the nation. The demonym of Brisbane is "Brisbanite".

Queensland North-east state of Australia

Queensland is the second-largest and third-most populous state in the Commonwealth of Australia. Situated in the north-east of the country, it is bordered by the Northern Territory, South Australia and New South Wales to the west, south-west and south respectively. To the east, Queensland is bordered by the Coral Sea and Pacific Ocean. To its north is the Torres Strait, with Papua New Guinea located less than 200 km across it from the mainland. The state is the world's sixth-largest sub-national entity, with an area of 1,852,642 square kilometres (715,309 sq mi).

St Laurences College Catholic boys school in Queensland, Australia

St Laurence's College is a private Catholic school for boys located in South Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. It was founded by the Christian Brothers in 1915. The school currently has an enrolment of over 1900 students from Year 5 to Year 12. St Laurence's is a College in the Edmund Rice Tradition. St Laurence's is currently associated with the Associated Independent Colleges sporting association.

After this achievement, he went on to record mixed doubles championships in the Australian Open in 1964, French Open in 1964 and 1965, and Wimbledon in 1965, 1966, and 1968. All of his mixed doubles Grand Slam titles were in partnership with Smith Court.

He also achieved a Grand Slam title in men's doubles in the 1964 French Open, playing with Roy Emerson. At the Wimbledon men's doubles championship, he was a finalist with Robert Hewitt in 1965, the champion in 1966 partnering John Newcombe, and a finalist again in 1967 with Roy Emerson. In total Fletcher won 27 international tennis titles. He was ranked World No. 10 in 1966 by Lance Tingay of The Daily Telegraph . [1]

Roy Emerson Australian tennis player

Roy Stanley Emerson is an Australian former World number one tennis player who won 12 Major singles titles and 16 Grand Slam tournament men's doubles titles. He is the only male player to have completed a Career Grand Slam in both singles and doubles. His 28 major titles are an all-time record for a male amateur player. Emerson is the first male player to win each amateur major title at least twice in his career. He is one of only eight men to win all four majors in his career.

Bob Hewitt South-African tennis player and rapist

Robert Anthony John Hewitt is a former professional tennis player from Australia. In 1967, after marrying a South African, he became a South African citizen. He has won 15 major titles and a career Grand Slam in both men's and mixed doubles.

John Newcombe Australian tennis player

John David Newcombe, AO, OBE is a former tennis player from Australia who is one of the few men to have attained a world No. 1 ranking in both singles and doubles. At the majors he won seven singles titles and a former record 17 men's doubles titles. He also contributed to five Davis Cup titles for Australia during an age when Davis Cup was deemed as significant as the majors. Tennis magazine rated him the 10th best male player of the period 1965–2005.

Ken was a larrikin by nature, and many of his exploits feature in Hugh Lunn's books, especially Over the Top with Jim and Head Over Heels. In later years he was instrumental in gaining significant funding for medical research in Australia, through his association with Chuck Feeney. In 2008 Hugh Lunn published a book on Ken's remarkable life around the globe, The Great Fletch with ABC Books. [4] [5]

Larrikin

Larrikin is an Australian English term meaning "a mischievous young person, an uncultivated, rowdy but good hearted person", or "a person who acts with apparent disregard for social or political conventions".

Hugh Duncan Lunn is an Australian journalist and author.

Charles Francis "Chuck" Feeney is an Irish-American businessman and philanthropist and the founder of The Atlantic Philanthropies, one of the largest private foundations in the world. He made his fortune as a co-founder of the Duty Free Shoppers Group, which pioneered the concept of duty-free shopping. Feeney gave away his fortune in secret for many years, until a business dispute resulted in his identity being revealed in 1997. Over the course of his life, Feeney has given away more than $8 billion.

Fletcher died of cancer at the age of 65 and was buried at the Mount Gravatt Lawn Cemetery, Brisbane.

In January 2012 Ken Fletcher was inducted into the Australian Tennis Hall of Fame. [6]

Ken Fletcher Memorial, Tennyson Ken Fletcher Memorial, Tennyson 02.JPG
Ken Fletcher Memorial, Tennyson

In 2013 the Ken Fletcher memorial was erected in the park, outside the Queensland Tennis Centre, named in his honour . He is the only player in the history of tennis, to win a grand slam (1963), in mixed doubles, that is not enshrined in the International Tennis Hall Of Fame.

Grands Slam finals

Singles: 1 (1 runner-up)

ResultYearChampionshipSurfaceOpponentScore
Loss 1963 Australian Championships Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roy Emerson 3–6, 3–6, 1–6

Doubles: 9 (2 titles, 7 runners-up)

ResultYearChampionshipSurfacePartnerOpponentsScore
Loss1963 Australian Championships Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Newcombe Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Bob Hewitt
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Fred Stolle
2–6, 6–3, 3–6 6–3, 3–6
Loss1964Australian ChampionshipsGrass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roy Emerson Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Bob Hewitt
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Fred Stolle
4–6, 5–7, 6–3, 6–4, 12–14
Winner1964 French Championships Clay Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roy Emerson Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Newcombe
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Tony Roche
6–3, 6–4
Loss1964 Wimbledon Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roy Emerson Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Bob Hewitt
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Fred Stolle
5–7, 9–11, 4–6
Loss1965French ChampionshipsClay Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Bob Hewitt Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roy Emerson
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Fred Stolle
8–6, 3–6, 6–8, 2–6
Loss1965WimbledonGrass Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Bob Hewitt Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Newcombe
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Tony Roche
5–7, 3–6, 4–6
Winner1966WimbledonGrass Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Newcombe Flag of Australia (converted).svg William Bowrey
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Owen Davidson
6–3, 6–4, 3–6, 6–3
Loss1967French ChampionshipsClay Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roy Emerson Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Newcombe
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Tony Roche
3–6, 7–9, 10–12
Loss1967WimbledonGrass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Roy Emerson Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Bob Hewitt
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Frew McMillan
2–6, 3–6, 4–6

Mixed doubles: 11 (10 titles, 1 runner-up)

ResultYearChampionshipSurfacePartnerOpponentsScore
Winner1963 Australian Championships Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of Australia (converted).svg Fred Stolle
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Lesley Turner Bowrey
6–4, 6–4
Winner1963 French Championships Clay Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of Australia (converted).svg Fred Stolle
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Lesley Turner Bowrey
6–1, 6–2
Winner1963 Wimbledon Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of South Africa (1928-1994).svg Bob Hewitt
Flag of the United States.svg Darlene Hard
11–9, 6–4
Winner1963 US Championships (3)Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of the United States.svg Ed Rubinoff
Flag of the United States.svg Judy Tegart Dalton
0–6, 6–4, 6–4
Winner1964Australian Championships (2)Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Mike Sangster
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Jan Lehane O'Neill
6–4, 6–4
Winner1964French Championships (2)Clay Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of Australia (converted).svg Fred Stolle
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Lesley Turner Bowrey
6–3, 4–6, 8–6
Loss1964 Wimbledon Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of Australia (converted).svg Fred Stolle
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Lesley Turner Bowrey
6–4, 6–4
Winner1965French Championships (3)Clay Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of Australia (converted).svg John Newcombe
Flag of Brazil.svg Maria Bueno
6–4, 6–4
Winner1965Wimbledon (2)Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of Australia (converted).svg Tony Roche
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Judy Tegart Dalton
12–10, 6–3
Winner1966Wimbledon (3)Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of the United States.svg Dennis Ralston
Flag of the United States.svg Billie Jean King
4–6, 6–3, 6–3
↓ Open Era ↓
Winner1968Wimbledon (4)Grass Flag of Australia (converted).svg Margaret Smith Court Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Alex Metreveli
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg Olga Morozova
6–1, 14–12

Related Research Articles

References

  1. 1 2 United States Lawn Tennis Association (1972). Official Encyclopedia of Tennis (First Edition), p. 428.
  2. "Ken Fletcher, former doubles champ, dies at 65". ESPN. 13 Feb 2006. Retrieved 17 April 2012.
  3. Tony Moore (30 November 2011). "Park honour planned for great Brisbane larrikin". Brisbane Times. Retrieved 17 April 2012.
  4. Mike Colman (17 October 2008). "Life was a racket for Ken Fletcher". The Courier-Mail. Retrieved 17 April 2012.
  5. "'The Great Fletch' : a story of a tennis player and a larrikin". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 9 October 2008. Retrieved 17 April 2012.
  6. "Ken Fletcher inducted into Australian Tennis Hall of Fame". Tennis Australia. Retrieved 17 April 2012.

Further reading

Lunn, Hugh (2008). The Great Fletch: The Dazzling Life of Wimbledon Aussie Larrikin Ken Fletcher ISBN   0-7333-2209-3