Ken Reardon

Last updated
Ken Reardon
Hockey Hall of Fame, 1966
Born(1921-04-01)April 1, 1921
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Died March 15, 2008(2008-03-15) (aged 86)
Saint-Saveur, Quebec, Canada
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 180 lb (82 kg; 12 st 12 lb)
Position Defence
Shot Left
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 19401950

Kenneth Joseph "Kenny" Reardon (April 1, 1921 – March 15, 2008) was a Canadian professional ice hockey defenceman who played for the Montreal Canadiens in the National Hockey League. He was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1966. Ken is the brother of Terry Reardon.

Canadians citizens of Canada

Canadians are people identified with the country of Canada. This connection may be residential, legal, historical or cultural. For most Canadians, several of these connections exist and are collectively the source of their being Canadian.

Ice hockey team sport played on ice using sticks, skates, and a puck

Ice hockey is a contact team sport played on ice, usually in a rink, in which two teams of skaters use their sticks to shoot a vulcanized rubber puck into their opponent's net to score points. The sport is known to be fast-paced and physical, with teams usually consisting of six players each: one goaltender, and five players who skate up and down the ice trying to take the puck and score a goal against the opposing team.

Montreal Canadiens National Hockey League team in Montreal, Quebec, Canada

The Montreal Canadiens are a professional ice hockey team based in Montreal, Quebec. They are members of the Atlantic Division of the Eastern Conference of the National Hockey League (NHL).

Contents

Reardon was born April 1, 1921 in Winnipeg, Manitoba. [1] He was known as a tough defenceman, a physical player who exhibited great endurance by continuing to play while injured. He played two seasons with Montreal before enlisting in the Canadian Army in 1942. [1] He spent several years playing for army teams in the Ottawa area, winning the Allan Cup with the Commandos in 1943 before he was shipped overseas. During World War II, Reardon returned to the Canadiens and won the Stanley Cup in 1946. He retired prior to turning 30, a probable result of the numerous injuries he sustained.

Canadian Army land component of the Canadian Armed Forces

The Canadian Army is the command responsible for the operational readiness of the conventional ground forces of the Canadian Armed Forces. As of 2018 the Army has 23,000 regular soldiers, about 17,000 reserve soldiers, including 5,000 rangers, for a total of 40,000 soldiers. The Army is supported by 3,000 civilian employees. It maintains regular forces units at bases across Canada, and is also responsible for the Army Reserve, the largest component of the Primary Reserve. The Commander of the Canadian Army and Chief of the Army Staff is Lieutenant-General Jean-Marc Lanthier.

Ottawa Federal capital city in Ontario, Canada

Ottawa is the capital city of Canada. It stands on the south bank of the Ottawa River in the eastern portion of southern Ontario. Ottawa borders Gatineau, Quebec; the two form the core of the Ottawa–Gatineau census metropolitan area (CMA) and the National Capital Region (NCR). As of 2016, Ottawa had a city population of 964,743 and a metropolitan population of 1,323,783 making it the fourth-largest city and the fifth-largest CMA in Canada.

Allan Cup

The Allan Cup is the trophy awarded annually to the national senior amateur men's ice hockey champions of Canada. It was donated by Sir Montagu Allan of Ravenscrag, Montreal, and has been competed for since 1909. The current champions are the Lacombe Generals, who captured the 2019 Allan Cup in Lacombe, Alberta.

Reardon continued his hockey career off-ice, scouting for and managing farm teams before becoming a successful executive in hockey with the Canadiens. He was announced as coach of the Kitchener Greenshirts in March of 1954. [1] The position came after working as chief of staff of the Cincinnati Mohawks. He earned the position as the Canadiens vice-president in 1956. [2] During his tenure with Montreal the team won five Stanley Cup titles. He was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1966. [3] He died on March 15, 2008 at the age of 86. [4] [5]

The Kitchener Greenshirts name has been used by five separate ice hockey teams playing in Kitchener, Ontario, Canada. These include one 'Senior A' level hockey team, two 'Junior A' level teams, and two 'Junior B' level teams. The name has also been used for a team in the Ontario Minor Hockey Association (OMHA).

Cincinnati Mohawks ice hockey team

The Cincinnati Mohawks were a professional ice hockey team in Cincinnati, Ohio. They were a member of the American Hockey League (AHL) between 1949 and 1952. They were founded as the Washington Lions, then were relocated from Washington, D.C.

Awards and achievements

Stanley Cup championship trophy awarded annually in the National Hockey League

The Stanley Cup is the championship trophy awarded annually to the National Hockey League (NHL) playoff winner. It is the oldest existing trophy to be awarded to a professional sports franchise, and the International Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF) considers it to be one of the "most important championships available to the sport". The trophy was commissioned in 1892 as the Dominion Hockey Challenge Cup and is named after Lord Stanley of Preston, the Governor General of Canada who donated it as an award to Canada's top-ranking amateur ice hockey club. The entire Stanley family supported the sport, the sons and daughters all playing and promoting the game. The first Cup was awarded in 1893 to Montreal Hockey Club, and winners from 1893 to 1914 were determined by challenge games and league play. Professional teams first became eligible to challenge for the Stanley Cup in 1906. In 1915, professional ice hockey organizations National Hockey Association (NHA) and the Pacific Coast Hockey Association (PCHA) reached a gentlemen's agreement in which their respective champions would face each other annually for the Stanley Cup. It was established as the de facto championship trophy of the NHL in 1926 and then the de jure NHL championship prize in 1947.

The 1946 Stanley Cup Finals was a best-of-seven series between the Boston Bruins and the Montreal Canadiens. The Canadiens would win the series four games to one.

The 1956 Stanley Cup Finals was contested by the Montreal Canadiens and the two-time defending champion Detroit Red Wings in the fourth Detroit-Montreal series in the 1950s, the two teams having met in the previous two years as well as 1952; Detroit won all three. The Canadiens were appearing in their sixth consecutive Finals, the Red Wings their third. The Canadiens would win the series 4–1.

Career statistics

   Regular season   Playoffs
Season TeamLeagueGP G A Pts PIM GPGAPtsPIM
1937–38Blue River RebelsBCJHL
1938–39Edmonton Athletic ClubEJrHL9011152022
1938–39 Edmonton Athletic Club M-Cup 20110
1939–40Edmonton Athletic ClubEJrHL104240228
1939–40 Edmonton Athletic ClubM-Cup1418133146
1940–41 Montreal Canadiens NHL 3428104130004
1941–42 Montreal CanadiensNHL41312159330004
1942–43Ottawa Commandos OCHL 26716237723391247
1942–43Ottawa ArmyOCHL101071715
1943–44Ottawa CommandosOCHL11010
1945–46 Montreal CanadiensNHL435494591124
1945–46 Montreal Royals QSHL 20004
1946–47 Montreal CanadiensNHL525172284712320
1947–48 Montreal CanadiensNHL5871522129
1948–49 Montreal CanadiensNHL4631316103700018
1949–50 Montreal CanadiensNHL6712728109202212
NHL totals34126961226043125762

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 Taylor, Len (March 3, 1954). "Ken Reardon New Coach Of Junior Hockey Club". Kitchener-Waterloo Record. p. 18.
  2. "Remembering Ken Reardon". NHL.com. Retrieved 16 January 2019.
  3. Reardon Biography at Legends of Hockey/Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved Feb. 03, 2008.
  4. Obituary at the National Post [ permanent dead link ]
  5. http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/montrealgazette/obituary.aspx?n=kenneth-joseph-reardon&pid=105845060