Kenneth Kaunda

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President Edgar Lungu announced on his Facebook page that Zambia will observe 21 days of national mourning. [86] On 21 June, Vice-President Inonge Wina announced that Kaunda's remains would be taken on a funeral procession around the country's provinces, with church services in each provincial capital, prior to a state funeral at National Heroes Stadium in Lusaka on 2 July and interment at the Presidential Burial Site on 7 July. [87]

Several other nations also announced periods of state mourning. Zimbabwe declared fourteen days of mourning; [88] South Africa declared ten days of mourning; [89] Botswana, [90] Malawi, [91] Namibia [92] and Tanzania [92] all declared seven days of mourning; Mozambique [93] declared six days of mourning; South Sudan [94] declared three days of mourning; Cuba [95] declared one day of mourning. President of Singapore Halimah Yacob offered her condolences to the politicians and people of Zambia for Kaunda's death. [96]

Awards and honours

Foreign honours

Awards

Publications

See also

Related Research Articles

The history of Zambia experienced many stages from colonization to independence from Britain on October 24, 1964. Northern Rhodesia became a British sphere of influence in the present-day region of Zambia in 1888, and was officially proclaimed a British protectorate in 1924. After many years of suggested mergers, Southern Rhodesia, Northern Rhodesia, and Nyasaland were merged into the British Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Politics of Zambia</span> Political system of Zambia

The politics of Zambia takes place in a framework of a presidential representative democratic republic, whereby the president of Zambia is head of state, head of government and leader of a multi-party system. Executive power is exercised by the government, while legislative power is vested in both the government and parliament. Formerly Northern Rhodesia, Zambia became a republic immediately upon attaining independence in October 1964.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Foreign relations of Zambia</span> Zambian diplomatic relations stance with other countries

After independence in 1964 the foreign relations of Zambia were mostly focused on supporting liberation movements in other countries in Southern Africa, such as the African National Congress and SWAPO. During the Cold War Zambia was a member of the Non-Aligned Movement.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Frederick Chiluba</span> Former President of Zambia (1991–2002)

Frederick Jacob Titus Chiluba was a Zambian politician who was the second president of Zambia from 1991 to 2002. Chiluba, a trade union leader, won the country's multi-party presidential election in 1991 as the candidate of the Movement for Multi-party Democracy (MMD), defeating long-time President Kenneth Kaunda. He was re-elected in 1996. As he was unable to run for a third term in 2001, former Vice President Levy Mwanawasa instead ran as the MMD candidate and succeeded him. After leaving office, Chiluba was the subject of a long investigation and trial regarding alleged corruption; he was eventually acquitted in 2009.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Movement for Multi-Party Democracy</span> Zambian political party, dominate 1991-2011

The Movement for Multi-party Democracy (MMD) also known as New Hope MMD is a political party in Zambia. Originally formed to oust the previous government, MMD controlled an absolute majority in parliament between 1991 and 2001, when its past leader, Frederick Chiluba was President of Zambia. Its election into power in 1991 ended the 27-year rule of President Kenneth Kaunda and his United National Independence Party (UNIP). It remained the dominant party within Zambian politics until the general elections of September 2011.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">President of Zambia</span> Head of state and of government in Zambia

The president of Zambia is the head of state and the head of government of Zambia. The office was first held by Kenneth Kaunda following independence in 1964. Since 1991, when Kaunda left the presidency, the office has been held by seven others: Frederick Chiluba, Levy Mwanawasa, Rupiah Banda, Michael Sata, Edgar Lungu and the current president Hakainde Hichilema, who won the 2021 presidential election. In addition, acting president Guy Scott served in an interim capacity after the death of President Michael Sata.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Prime Minister of Zambia</span> Former head of government in Zambia

The prime minister of Zambia was the head of government of Zambia. From 1973 to 1975, Mainza Chona was the first person to hold the position following independence from the United Kingdom.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">United National Independence Party</span> Political party in Zambia

The United National Independence Party (UNIP) is a political party in Zambia. It governed the country from 1964 to 1991 under the socialist presidency of Kenneth Kaunda, and was the sole legal party in the country between 1973 and 1990. On 4 April 2021, Bishop Trevor Mwamba was elected President of UNIP.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Elections in Zambia</span> Political elections for public offices in Zambia

Elections in Zambia take place within the framework of a multi-party democracy and a presidential system. The President and National Assembly are simultaneously elected for five-year terms.

Mainza Mathias Chona was a Zambian politician and founder of UNIP who served as the third vice-president of Zambia from 1970 to 1973 and Prime Minister on two occasions: from 25 August 1973 to 27 May 1975 and from 20 July 1977 to 15 June 1978.

Alice Lenshina (1920–1978) was a Zambian woman, prisoner of conscience and self-appointed "prophetess" who is noted for her part in the "Lumpa Uprising", which claimed 700 lives.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Harry Nkumbula</span> Zambian politician (1916–1983)

Harry Mwaanga Nkumbula was a Zambian nationalist leader involved in the movement for the independence of Northern Rhodesia, as Zambia was known until the end of British rule in 1964. He was born in the village of Maala in the Namwala district of Zambia's southern province. He was the youngest of three children and the only son.

Simon Mwansa Kapwepwe was a Zambian politician, anti-colonialist and author who served as the second vice-president of Zambia from 1967 to 1970.

Emmanuel Kasonde was a Zambian economist and politician who served as the Finance permanent secretary or Minister of Finance under three successive Zambian presidential administrations, including Kenneth Kaunda, Frederick Chiluba and Levy Mwanawasa.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1964 Northern Rhodesian general election</span>

General elections were held in Northern Rhodesia on 20 and 21 January 1964. There were two voter rolls for the Legislative Council, a main roll that elected 65 seats, and a reserved roll that elected 10. Africans elected the main roll, whilst Europeans elected the reserve roll. Other ethnicities were allowed to choose which roll to be part of. The United National Independence Party won the elections, taking 55 of the common roll seats. Its leader, Kenneth Kaunda became Prime Minister, leading the country to independence in October that year, at which point he became President. Voter turnout was 94.8% for the main roll and 74.1% for the reserved roll.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1991 Zambian general election</span>

General elections were held in Zambia on 31 October 1991 to elect a President and National Assembly. They were the first multi-party elections since 1968, and only the second multi-party elections since independence in 1964. The United National Independence Party (UNIP), which had led the country since independence, was comprehensively beaten by the Movement for Multi-Party Democracy (MMD). Kenneth Kaunda, who had been president since independence, was defeated in a landslide by MMD challenger Frederick Chiluba in the presidential elections, whilst the MMD won 125 of the 150 elected seats in the expanded National Assembly. Voter turnout was 45%.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1962 Northern Rhodesian general election</span>

General elections were held in Northern Rhodesia on 30 October 1962, with by-elections for several seats held on 10 December. Although the United Federal Party won the most seats in the Legislative Council, and Northern Rhodesian African National Congress leader Harry Nkumbula had made a secret electoral pact with the UFP, Nkumbula decided to form a government with the United National Independence Party.

Jethro Mukenge Mutti, was a Zambian politician who between the years 1964 to 1975 served as member of parliament, Ambassador, Minister and Member of the Central Committee under the ruling party UNIP led by Kenneth Kaunda. He died on 18 January 2013 after complications from aspiration pneumonia following a series of mini strokes and poor health in the last few years of his life, linked to his tetraplegic condition.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Betty Kaunda</span> Former First Lady of Zambia (1928–2012)

Beatrice "Betty" Kaunda, was a Zambian educator and inaugural First Lady of Zambia from 1964 to 1991 as the wife of the country's first president, Kenneth Kaunda. She was known as Mama Betty Kaunda and the Mother of Zambia by Zambians.

Daniel Munkombwe was a Zambian politician. He worked as a political organizer and administrator for the ZANC in Northern Rhodesia before and after independence. He was elected to Parliament in 1973 and served for 19 years. In 2001, he was appointed Minister for the Southern Province by Levy Mwanawasa and continued in that and other government posts until 2015, having been subsequently appointed by Rupiah Banda and Michael Sata.

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Bibliography

Kenneth Kaunda
Kenneth David Kaunda.jpg
Kaunda in 1983
1st President of Zambia
In office
24 October 1964 2 November 1991
Preceded by Sir Evelyn Hone as Governor of Northern Rhodesia
Succeeded by Frederick Chiluba
Political offices
Preceded byas Prime Minister of the Federation of Rhodesia and Nyasaland Prime Minister of Northern Rhodesia
1964
Succeeded by
Himself
as President of Zambia
Preceded by
Himself
as Prime Minister of Northern Rhodesia
President of Zambia
1964–1991
Succeeded by
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by Chairperson of the Non-Aligned Movement
1970–1973
Succeeded by