Kevin Tamati

Last updated

Kevin Tamati
Personal information
Full nameKevin Ronald Tamati
Born (1953-09-21) 21 September 1953 (age 67)
Bridge Pā, Hawke's Bay, New Zealand
Playing information
Height178 cm (5 ft 10 in)
Weight95 kg (14 st 13 lb)
Position Prop, Second-row
Club
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1971–74 Petone Panthers
1975–80 Upper Hutt Tigers
1981–82 Randwick
1982–85 Widnes 96151058
1984 Randwick
1984–85 Northcote Tigers
1985–89 Warrington 105+1160024
1990–91 Salford 5+20000
Total219211082
Representative
YearsTeamPldTGFGP
1972–82 Wellington 52
1984 Auckland
1975–80 New Zealand Māori
1979–85 New Zealand 221003
Coaching information
Club
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
198993 Salford
199498 Chorley Borough
199900 Whitehaven
Total0000
Representative
YearsTeamGmsWDLW%
2006 New Zealand Māori
Source: [1] [2]

[3]

Kevin Ronald Tamati [4] (born 21 September 1953) is a New Zealand former rugby league representative player and coach. He played at representative level for New Zealand, New Zealand Māori, Auckland, Central Districts and Wellington, and professionally at club level for Widnes, Warrington and Salford, Chorley Borough in the forwards. [1] He has coached the New Zealand Māori, and professionally for Salford, Chorley Borough/Lancashire Lynx, British Army Rugby League and Whitehaven. [2] He is the cousin of fellow international Howie Tamati.

Contents

Early life and family

Born in 1953 of Ngāti Kahungunu and Ngāti Mutunga descent, Tamati was educated at Hastings Boys' High School. He is the cousin of Howie Tamati. [5]

Playing career

After moving to Wellington in 1971 Tamati took up rugby league, joining the Petone Panthers club. [5] He later played for the Upper Hutt Tigers and the Randwick Kingfishers. He made the Junior Kiwis in 1973. A Wellington representative, Tamati made a name for himself as a tough player.

He moved to England in 1982 and had success with both Widnes and Warrington. During the 1984 season Tamati played on Saturday for the Northcote Tigers in the Auckland Rugby League competition and then flew down to Wellington on Sundays to play for the Randwick Kingfishers. [5] During this season Tamati also represented Auckland.

A Wellington representative and New Zealand international, Tamati played 52 times for Wellington and for the Kiwis from 1979 until 1985. [6] He is perhaps best known for his fight with Australian prop Greg Dowling which continued on the sideline after both players had been sent to the sin-bin by French referee Julien Rascagneres. [7] Tamati won caps for New Zealand in 1979 against Great Britain (3 matches), in 1980 against Australia (2 matches), and Great Britain (3 matches), and France (2 matches), in 1981 against France, while at Widnes in 1982 against Australia (2 matches), and Papua New Guinea, in 1984 against Great Britain, in 1985 against Australia (2 matches), in 1985 in the 1985–1988 Rugby League World Cup against Australia, in 1985 against Great Britain (interchange/substitute), and in 1985 in the 1985–1988 Rugby League World Cup against Great Britain. [1] In total Tamati playing in 37 games for the Kiwis, including 29 test matches.

Premiership Final appearances

Kevin Tamati played in Warrington's 38–10 victory over Halifax in the Premiership Final during the 1985–86 season at Elland Road, Leeds on Sunday 18 May 1986.

Challenge Cup Final appearances

Kevin Tamati played right-prop, i.e. number 10, in Widnes' 19–6 victory over Wigan in the 1984 Challenge Cup Final during the 1983–84 season at Wembley Stadium, London on Saturday 5 May 1984, in front of a crowd of 80,116.

County Cup Final appearances

Kevin Tamati played right-prop, i.e. number 10, in Widnes' 8–12 defeat by Barrow in the 1983 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1983–84 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 1 October 1983, played as an interchange/substitute, i.e. number 15, (replacing Second-row Les Boyd) in Warrington's 8–34 defeat by Wigan in the 1985 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1985–86 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens, on Sunday 13 October 1985, [8] and played left-prop, i.e.number 8, in the 16–28 defeat by Wigan in the 1987 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1987–88 season at Knowsley Road, St. Helens on Sunday 11 October 1987. [9]

John Player Special Trophy Final appearances

Kevin Tamati played right-prop, i.e. number 10, in Widnes' 10-18 defeat by Leeds in the 1983–84 John Player Special Trophy Final during the 1983–84 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 14 January 1984, and played hooker (replaced by interchange/substitute Alan Rathbone at half-time) in Warrington's 4-18 defeat by Wigan in the 1986–87 John Player Special Trophy Final during the 1986–87 season at Burnden Park, Bolton on Saturday 10 January 1987. [10]

Coaching career

Tamati coached the Salford from 1989 until 1993.

Tamati was employed as a rugby league development officer with Warrington Borough Council for nine years from 1989 to 1997 when he left in 1997 to take up a full-time position coaching the Lancashire Lynx. [11] Tamati had previously been coaching Chorley Borough part-time, but the club's rebirth as the Lancashire Lynx prompted him to take up the roll full-time. Tamati was released by Lynx at end of the 1998 season, after failing to agree a new contract. [12]

Tamati then began a two-year spell coaching the Whitehaven. [13] [14]

In 2006 Tamati was coach of the New Zealand Māori rugby league team. [5]

Later years

Tamati was inducted into the New Zealand Rugby League Legends of League in 1995. [15] He is an Auckland Rugby League Immortal. [16]

Tamati is currently chairman and referee coordinator for Rugby League Hawkes Bay. [5]

Tamati was named at Prop in the Petone Panthers' Team of the Century in 2012. [17]

In 2012 he was named in the Wellington Rugby League's Team of the Century.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. 1 2 "Coach Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  3. Rothmans RL Yearbooks
  4. "TAMATI, Kevin Ronald 1979 – 85 – Kiwi #551". nzleague.co.nz. 31 December 2017. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 Kevin Tamati Maori Sports Profile & Database
  6. Lion Red 1988 Rugby League Annual, New Zealand Rugby League, 1988. p.p.151-159
  7. "Cup win would lift Kiwi gloom". bbc.co.uk. 24 November 2000. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  8. "1985–1986 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  9. "1987–1988 Lancashire Cup Final". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  10. "10th January 1987: Warrington 4 Wigan 18 (John Player Trophy Final)". wigan.rlfans.com. 31 December 2014. Retrieved 1 January 2015.
  11. "'Darby' Moves In, Tamati Goes Out". runcornandwidnesworld.co.uk. 23 October 1997. Retrieved 1 January 2018.[ permanent dead link ]
  12. "RUGBY LEAGUE: Lynx set to face ex-coach Tamati". Lancashire Evening Telegraph. 13 February 1999. Retrieved 28 May 2008.[ permanent dead link ]
  13. "Lynx set to face ex-coach Tamati". prestoncitizen.co.uk. 13 February 1999. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  14. "Cullen's new challenge". bbc.co.uk. 19 September 2000. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  15. "New Zealand Rugby League Annual Report 2008" (PDF). NZRL. 31 December 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 September 2009. Retrieved 1 January 2009.
  16. "Stacey Jones, Auckland Rugby League Immortal". est1995.co.nz. 21 September 2003. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2004.
  17. "Petone Rugby League marks its 100th year". stuff.co.nz. 31 December 2011. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Dean Clark
2006
Coach
Tino Rangatiratanga Maori sovereignty movement flag.svg
New Zealand Māori

2006-2008
Succeeded by
Luke Goodwin
2008
Preceded by
Edgar
Coach
Haven colours.svg
Whitehaven RLFC

1999–2000
Succeeded by
Paul Cullen
2000-2002
Preceded by
Bob Eccles
1994
Coach
Blackpoolcolours.svg
Lancashire Lynx
formerly Chorley Borough & Chorley Cheiftans

1994–1998
Succeeded by
Darren Abram
1998
Preceded by
Kevin Ashcroft
1984–1990
Coach
North Sydney colours.svg
Salford

1990–1993
Succeeded by
Garry Jack
1994–1995