Kh-58

Last updated
Kh-58
(NATO reporting name: AS-11 'Kilter')
H-58U AS-11 Kilter 2008 G1.jpg
Kh-58U in the Ukrainian Air Force Museum
Typeair-launched anti-radiation missile, surface-to-surface missile
Place of origin Soviet Union/Russia
Service history
In service1982–present [1]
Used byRussia, India, Algeria, Iran [1]
Wars Russo-Georgian War
Iran–Iraq War
Production history
Designed1970s
Manufacturer Raduga NPO
Specifications
Mass650 kg (1,430 lb) [2]
Length480 cm (15 ft 9 in) [2]
Diameter38 cm (15.0 in) [2]
WarheadHigh Explosive [1]
Warhead weight149 kg (328 lb) [2]

EngineSolid rocket [1]
Wingspan117 cm (46.1 in) [2]
Operational
range
Kh-58: up to 120 km (65 nmi)
Kh-58U :250 km (130 nmi) [1]
Kh-58E: 46–200 km (25–110 nmi) [2]
Maximum speed Mach 3.6
Guidance
system
Inertial with passive radar seeker [1]
Launch
platform
Su-24M, [1] Mig-25BM, [1] Su-22M4, [2] Su-25TK, [2] Su-30MK [3]

The Kh-58 (Russian : Х-58; NATO:AS-11 'Kilter') is a Soviet anti-radiation missile with a range of 120 km. As of 2004 the Kh-58U variant was still the primary anti-radiation missile of Russia and its allies. [1] It is being superseded by the Kh-31. The NATO reporting name is "Kilter".

Contents

Development

The Bereznyak design bureau had developed the liquid-fuelled Kh-28 (AS-9 ‘Kyle’) and the KSR-5P (AS-6) anti-radiation missiles. [3] They merged with Raduga in 1967, so Raduga was given the contract in the early 1970s to develop a solid-fuel successor to the Kh-28 to equip the new Su-24M 'Fencer-D' attack aircraft. [3] Consequently, the project was initially designated the Kh-24, before becoming the Kh-58.[ citation needed ]

During the 1980s a longer-range variant was developed, the Kh-58U, with lock-on-after-launch capability. Since the fall of the Soviet Union, Raduga have offered several versions for export. [3]

Design

It was designed to be used in conjunction with the Su-24's L-086A "Fantasmagoria A" or L-086B "Fantasmagoria B" target acquisition system. [1] The range achieved depends heavily on the launch altitude, thus the original Kh-58 has a range of 36 km from low level, 120 km from 10,000 m (32,800 ft), and 160 km from 15,000 m (49,200 ft). [1]

Like other Soviet missiles of the time, the Kh-58 could be fitted with a range of seeker heads designed to target specific air defence radars such as MIM-14 Nike-Hercules or MIM-104 Patriot. [3]

Operational history

The Kh-58 was deployed in 1982 on the Su-24M 'Fencer D' in Soviet service. [1] The Kh-58U entered service in 1991 on the Su-24M and Mig-25BM 'Foxbat-F'. [1] The Kh-58E version can be carried on the Su-22M4 and Su-25TK as well, [2] while the Kh-58UshE appears to be intended for Chinese Su-30MKK's. [3]

Variants

Kh-58UShKE MAKS Airshow 2013 (Ramenskoye Airport, Russia) (524-20).jpg
Kh-58UShKE

Some Western sources have referred to a Kh-58A that is either optimised for naval radars or has an active seeker head for use as an anti-shipping missile - it probably represents another name for the Kh-58U.

Operators

Map with Kh-58 operators in blue and former operators in red Kh-58 operators.png
Map with Kh-58 operators in blue and former operators in red

Current operators

Flag of Algeria.svg  Algeria
Flag of India.svg  India
Flag of Iran.svg  Iran
Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia
Flag of Russia.svg  Russia

Former operators

Flag of Iraq.svg  Iraq
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
Flag of Ukraine.svg  Ukraine

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Staff of Journal of Electronic Defense (2004), International Electronic Countermeasures Handbook, Artech House, pp. 149–150, ISBN   9781580538985
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 X-58E, Tactical Missiles Corporation JSC, 2004, archived from the original on 28 September 2007, retrieved 10 February 2009
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 "Kh-58 (AS-11 'Kilter')", Jane's Air-Launched Weapons, 24 October 2007
  4. "Airshow China 2014: PAK-FA's new anti-radiation missile set for 2015 series production", Jane's Defence Weekly, 13 November 2014
  5. "Kh-58UShKE Anti-Radiation Missile". Rosoboronexport.
  6. MAKS 2015: KRTV adds IR seeker to Kh-58UShK anti-radiation missile
  7. "Ukraine - Air Force Equipment". GlobalSecurity.org. 2014. Retrieved 23 July 2014.

Further reading