Kh-80

Last updated
Kh-80
(NATO reporting name: AS-X-19 Koala)
P750 meteorit maquette.jpg
Kh-80 at MAKS 2009
Type Air-to-surface missile
Place of originRussia
Production history
Manufacturer NPO Mashinostroyeniya , MKB Raduga , KBKhA КБХА Химавтоматика , NPO Hartron НПО Хартрон
Specifications
Mass6,380 kg (6.4 ton)
Length12.8 m 3M25A (12.5 m 3M25)
Diameter0.9 m
Warheadvarious HE FAE TBX , TNW (200 kt to < 6 Mt)
Warhead weight± ~ 1,000 kg (1 ton)

Engineliquid RD-0242 , KR-23 KR-93 solid booster or ramjet ПВРД НПВО Пламя ОКБ-670 М.Бондарюк
Wingspan5.1 m
Propellantsolid booster , liquid
Operational
range
around 3,000 Km
Maximum speed 3 <4 6 Mach (3,500 Km/h)
Guidance
system
inertial, TERCOM, Radar
Launch
platform
Air launched , GLCM , coastal , ship , submarine К-420 проекта 667А «Навага» , Проект получил обозначение 667М «Андромеда» .

The Kh-80 Meteorit-A (GRAU-code: 3M25A, NATO: AS-X-19 Koala), the RK-75 Meteorit-N(GRAU:3M25N, NATO:SS-NX-24 Scorpion) and the P-750 Meteorit-M (Russian: П-750 Гром, GRAU:3М25, NATO: SSC-X-5) was a Soviet cruise missile which was supposed to replace subsonic intermediate range missiles in Soviet inventory.

Contents

Development of three variants of this cruise missile was authorized on 9 December 1976. [1] The Meteorit-M strategic version would be deployed from Project 667M submarines with 12 launchers per boat. The air-launched Meteorit-A would be launched from Tu-95 bombers. The land-based version was designated Meteorit-N. The missile was also sometimes referred to by the code-name Grom. The first test launch, on 20 May 1980, was unsuccessful, as were the next three attempts. The first successful flight did not come until 16 December 1981. The first launch from a 667M Andromeda submarine took place on 26 December 1983 from the Barents Sea.

The missile was designed by Chelomei at NPO Mashinostroeniye and designated the SSC-X-5 GLCM by the US Department of Defense. The turbojet-powered missile would cruise at Mach 2.5 to 3.0 at 20 km (max 24) altitude over its 3,000 km range. It was equipped with a 1 Mt thermonuclear warhead and used inertial navigation with mid-course update via data link.

Manufacturer: Chelomei. Maximum range: 3,000 km (1,900 mi) to [1] 5,000 km. [2]

Variants

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References

  1. 1 2 "Intermediate range cruise missile. 7".
  2. http://rbase.new-factoria.ru/missile/wobb/meteorit/meteorit.shtml