Khost Province

Last updated
Khost

خوست
Sowy Nabi - panoramio.jpg
A village in the Nadir Shah Kot District of Khost Province
Khost in Afghanistan.svg
Map of Afghanistan with Khost highlighted
Coordinates(Capital): 33°24′N69°54′E / 33.4°N 69.9°E / 33.4; 69.9 Coordinates: 33°24′N69°54′E / 33.4°N 69.9°E / 33.4; 69.9
CountryFlag of Afghanistan.svg  Afghanistan
Capital Khost
Government
   Governor Mohammad Sadiq Patman
Area
  Total4,151.5 km2 (1,602.9 sq mi)
Population
 (2021) [1]
  Total647,730
  Density160/km2 (400/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+4:30 (Afghanistan Time)
Area code(s) AF-KHO
Main languages Pashto

Khost (Pashto/Dari: خوست) is one of the 34 provinces of Afghanistan, located in the eastern part of the country. To the east, Khost Province is bordered by North Waziristan and Kurram in Pakistan. Khost Province used to be part of Paktia Province in the past, and the larger region surrounding Khost is still called Loya Paktia ("Greater Paktia").

Contents

The city of Khost serves as the capital of Khost province. The population of the province is around 647,730, [1] which is mostly a tribal society. Khost Airport serves the province for domestic flights to Afghanistan's capital, Kabul.

History

In 1924, Khost Province, then known as Southern Province, was the scene of a rebellion by the Mangal Pashtun Tribe, known as the Khost rebellion. The rebellion was ultimately unsuccessful, and was defeated in 1925 by the Afghan Government. Khost was part of Paktia Province until 1985, when the People's Democratic Party of Afghanistan regime made it a separate province. [2]

Politics and governance

The current governor of the province is Mohammad Sadiq Patman. [3] The city of Khost is the capital of Khost province. All law enforcement activities throughout the province are controlled by the Afghan National Police (ANP). The border of Afghanistan's Khost province with neighboring Pakistan's FATA is monitored and protected by the Afghan Border Police (ABP), which is part of the ANP. The border is called the Durand Line and is known to be one of the most dangerous in the world due to heavy militant activities and illegal smugglings. A provincial police chief is assigned to lead both the ANP and ABP. The police chief represents the Ministry of the Interior in Kabul. The ANP is backed by other Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF). [4]

Healthcare

The percentage of households with clean drinking water increased from 34% in 2005 to 35% in 2011. [5] The percentage of births attended to by a skilled birth attendant increased from 18% in 2005 to 32% in 2011. [5]

Education

The overall literacy rate (6+ years of age) fell from 28% in 2005 to 15% in 2011. [5] The overall net enrolment rate (6–13 years of age) fell from 38% in 2005 to 37% in 2011. [5]

Demographics

Ethnolinguistic groups in Afghanistan US Army ethnolinguistic map of Afghanistan -- circa 2001-09.jpg
Ethnolinguistic groups in Afghanistan
Districts of Khost (not showing the Shamal District) Khost districts.png
Districts of Khost (not showing the Shamal District)

As of 2021, the population of the province is around 950,000 people. [1] [6] Other sources put the number at over a million. [7]

The Pashtun people make up 99% of the population, with the remaining 1% being Tajiks and others. [8]

Districts

Districts of Khost province
DistrictCapitalPopulation (2015)Area [9] Notes
Bak 50,000
Gurbuz 45,000
Zazi Maidan 70,000
Khost Matun Khost 140,642
Mandozayi Dadwal 89,602
Musakhel 41,882
Nadir Shah Kot 47,000
Qalandar 20,000
Sabari Yakubi 72,364
Shamal 34,000Shifted from Paktia Province in 2005
Spera 45,000
Tani Tani 60,842
Tirazayi Aliser 45,602

Water

Khost Province is traversed by the Kurram River, which rises from the Rokian Defile, passes through the district, and then enters the "country of the Turis or the Kurram Valley". [10]

See also

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Nangarhar Province Province of Afghanistan

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Nimruz Province Province of Afghanistan

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Paktia Province Province of Afghanistan

Paktia is one of the 34 provinces of Afghanistan, located in the east of the country. Forming part of the larger Loya Paktia region, Paktia Province is divided into 13 districts and has a population of roughly 611,952, which is mostly a tribal society living in rural areas. Pashtuns make up the majority of the population but smaller number of Tajiks are also found. Gardez is the provincial capital.

Maidan Wardak Province Province of Afghanistan

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Paktika Province Province of Afghanistan

Paktika(Pashto/Dari: پکتیکا) is one of the 34 provinces of Afghanistan, located in the eastern part of the country. Forming part of the larger Loya Paktia region, Paktika has a population of about 775,498, mostly ethnic Pashtuns. The town of Sharana serves as the provincial capital, while the most populous city is Urgun.

Badakhshan Province Province of Afghanistan

Badakhshan Province, Badaxšān) is one of the 34 provinces of Afghanistan, located in the farthest north-eastern part of the country between Tajikistan and Pakistan's Gilgit-Baltistan region. It shares a 56.5-mile (91 km) border with China.

The Zazi, also spelled Zazai, or Jaji, is a Karlani Pashtun tribe. They are found in Paktia and Khost provinces in the Loya Paktia region of southeastern Afghanistan, as well as Kurram Valley of Pakistan, but also have an effective presence in Kabul, Logar, Ghazni, Nangharhar, Kunduz, and Baghlan in Afghanistan.

Zazi Maidan District

Zazi Maidan District, or Jaji Maidan or Dzadzi Maidan, is located in the northeastern part of Khost Province, Afghanistan. It borders Bak District to the west, Paktia Province to the north, and the Kurram Agency of Pakistan to the north and east. According to Afghanistan's National Statistics and Information Authority (NSIA), the 2020 estimated population of the district was 26,236 people. The district center is the village of Zazi Maidan, situated in the eastern part of the district.

Nadir Shah Kot District Place in Khost, Afghanistan

Nadir Shah Kot District is situated in the western part of Khost Province, Afghanistan. It borders Paktia Province and Shamal District to the west, Qalandar District to the north, Musa Khel District to the northeast, Khost (Matun) District to the east, Mandozayi District to the southeast and Tani and Spera districts to the south.

The Mangal is a Pashtun tribe, residing in eastern Paktia and adjacent Khost provinces of Afghanistan, and in the town of Tari Mangal, district Kurram, Pakistan. Their land constitutes the northeastern part of the Loya Paktia region. The Mangals descent from Karlani Pashtun lineage.

The Zadran, also spelled Dzadran or Jadran, is a Pashtun tribe that inhabits the Loya Paktia region in southeastern Afghanistan and parts of Waziristan in neighboring Pakistan. "Zadran: Pashtun tribe mainly residing in the “Zadran Arc” a 9-district area encompassing portions of the Khost, Paktya, and Paktika provinces."

Loya Paktia

Lōya Paktiā is a historical and cultural region of Afghanistan, comprising the modern Afghan provinces of Khost, Paktia, and Paktika, as well as parts of Logar and parts of Kurram and Waziristan in Pakistan. Loya Paktia is vaguely defined by a common culture and history that is connected to the local indigenous tribes that reside in the region. Particular styles of clothing, articles of clothing, turban styles, turban cloth colors, dialects of Pashto language, etc. may sometimes be associated with specific tribes indigenous to Loya Paktia and thus integrate themselves into regional culture. For instance, a Pashtun tribesman from Loy Kandahar may quickly recognize a Pashtun from Loya Paktia based upon his turban style and color. Likewise, a Pashtun from Loya Paktia may recognize someone from Loy Kandahar based upon his unique style of collarless kameez (shirt) with specific embroidered patterns on the front. There are many subtle and intricate cultural indicators of this type that are not recorded in any known written history but simply known and observed by the tribesmen of the various Pashtun regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan.

The Sulaimankhel, or Suleiman Khel, are a Pashtun sub-tribe of the Ghilji tribe of Bettani confederation of Pashtuns. In the early 20th century, the tribe was recognised as generally pastoral.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Estimated Population of Afghanistan 2021-22" (PDF). nsia.gov.af. National Statistic and Information Authority (NSIA). April 2021. Retrieved June 30, 2021.
  2. Thomas Ruttig (2009). "Loya Paktia's Insurgency: The Haqqani Network as an Autonomous Entity" (PDF). Retrieved 6 August 2020.
  3. "Ghani appoints new governors for five provinces of Afghanistan". The Khaama Press News Agency. 2020-07-07. Retrieved 2020-07-12.
  4. Troops Arrive In Khost As Clash With Pakistani Army Continues. TOLOnews. April 15, 2018. Retrieved 2019-03-22.
  5. 1 2 3 4 Archive, Civil Military Fusion Centre, https://www.cimicweb.org/AfghanistanProvincialMap/Pages/Khost.aspx Archived 2014-05-31 at the Wayback Machine
  6. "Settled Population of Khost province by Civil Division, Urban, Rural and Sex-2012-13" (PDF). Islamic Republic of Afghanistan: Central Statistics Organization. Retrieved 2014-01-18.
  7. On the Road - Khost Province Season 1 (Pashto) on YouTube, Feb 13, 2012, TOLO/USAIDAfghanistan.
  8. "Khost Province" (PDF). Program for Culture & Conflict Studies. Naval Postgraduate School . Retrieved 2014-01-18.
  9. Afghanistan Geographic & Thematic Layers
  10. Imperial gazetteer of India: provincial series, Volume 20. Publisher Supt. of Govt. Print., 1908