Kiev Voivodeship

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Kiev Voivodeship
Palatinatus Kioviensis
Województwo kijowskie
Voivodeship of Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth¹
1471–1793
RON wojewodztwo kijowskie map.svg
The Kiev Voivodeship in
the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth in 1635.
CapitalKijów (Kyiv, 1471–1667), Żytomierz (Zhytomyr, 1667–1793)
Area 
 1793
200,000 km2 (77,000 sq mi)
Population 
 1793
500000
Government
Voivode  
 1471–1475
Martynas Goštautas (first)
 1559–1608
Konstanty Wasyl Ostrogski (transition)
 1791–1793
Antoni Protazy Potocki (last)
History 
 death of Simeon Olelkovich
1471
1503
1569
1648
1667
1793
Political subdivisions counties: 9 (1471–1569)
7 (1569–1667)
3 (1667–1793)
Preceded by
Succeeded by
POL COA Pogon Litewska Ksiazeca.svg Principality of Kyiv
Cossack Hetmanate Herb Viyska Zaporozkoho.svg
Kyiv Viceroyalty Kiev CoA 1782.gif
¹ Voivodeship of the Kingdom of Poland. The kingdom was part of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth from 1569.
Map of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth and its territorial losses in the mid 17th century. Polen in den Grenzen vor 1660.jpg
Map of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and its territorial losses in the mid 17th century.
Kyiv (Kiou). A fragment of Russiae, Moscoviae et Tartariae map by Anthony Jenkinson (London 1562) published by Ortelius in 1570. Kiou1562.jpg
Kyiv (Kiou). A fragment of Russiae, Moscoviae et Tartariae map by Anthony Jenkinson (London 1562) published by Ortelius in 1570.
Kyiv (Kiow) A fragment of piece Tractus Borysthenis Vulgo Dniepr at Niepr dicti. map by Joannii Janssonii (Amsterdam, 1663). Kiow, by Jan Jansson, circa 1663.jpg
Kyiv (Kiow) A fragment of piece Tractus Borysthenis Vulgo Dniepr at Niepr dicti. map by Joannii Janssonii (Amsterdam, 1663).

The Kiev Voivodeship [1] (Polish : Województwo kijowskie, Latin : Palatinatus Kioviensis) was a unit of administrative division and local government in the Grand Duchy of Lithuania from 1471 until 1569 and of the Crown of the Kingdom of Poland from 1569 until 1793, as part of Lesser Poland Province of the Polish Crown.

Contents

The voivodeship was established in 1471 upon the death of the last prince of Kyiv Simeon Olelkovich and transformation of the Duchy of Kyiv (appanage duchy of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania) into the Voivodeship of Kyiv.

Description

The voivodeship was established in 1471 under the order of King Casimir IV Jagiellon soon after the death of Semen Olelkovich. It had replaced the former Principality of Kyiv, ruled by Lithuanian-Ruthenian Olelkovich princes (related to House of Algirdas and Olshansky family). [2] [3]

Its first administrative center was Kyiv, but when the city was given to Imperial Russia in 1667 by Treaty of Andrusovo, the capital moved to Zhytomyr (Polish : Żytomierz), where it remained until 1793.

It was the biggest voivodeship of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth by land area, covering, among others, the land of Zaporizhian Cossacks.

Municipal government

The governor of the voivodeship was voivode (voivode of Kyiv). [4] In the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth the other two major administrative positions were castellan [5] and bishop (biskup kijowski).

Flag and coat of arms

The flag on one side had Lithuanian Pogon on red field and on other side black bear on white field with his front left paw raised up. [6]

Regional council ( sejmik )

Regional council [7] for all Ruthenian lands

Regional council [8] seats

Administrative division

Counties

Other former counties

Former counties lost under the Treaty of Andrusovo

  • Lubecz County, Lubecz
  • Oster County, Oster
  • City of Kijow

Elderships (Starostwo)

Instead of some liquidated counties in 1566 there were established elderships: Biała Cerkiew, Kaniów, Korsun, Romanówka, Czerkasy, Czigrin.

Free royal cities

Neighbouring Voivodeships and regions

See also

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References

  1. Kyiv voivodeship in the Encyclopedia of Ukraine
  2. "Lithuanian History" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 May 2008. Retrieved 24 July 2008.
  3. http://izbornyk.org.ua/dynasty/dyn.htm
  4. Polish : wojewoda kijowski
  5. Polish : kasztelan kijowski
  6. Województwo Kijowskie.
  7. Polish : sejmik generalny
  8. Polish : sejmik poselski i deputacki

Further reading

Coordinates: 50°27′00″N30°31′24″E / 50.450000°N 30.523333°E / 50.450000; 30.523333