Kii Province

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Map of Japanese provinces (1868) with Kii Province highlighted Provinces of Japan-Kii.svg
Map of Japanese provinces (1868) with Kii Province highlighted

Kii Province(紀伊国,Kii no Kuni), or Kishū(紀州), was a province of Japan in the part of Honshū that is today Wakayama Prefecture, as well as the southern part of Mie Prefecture. [1] Kii bordered Ise, Izumi, Kawachi, Shima, and Yamato Provinces. The Kii Peninsula takes its name from this province.

Provinces of Japan former administrative units of Japan

Provinces of Japan were administrative divisions before the modern prefecture system was established, when the islands of Japan were divided into tens of kuni, usually known in English as provinces. Each province was divided into gun.

Japan Constitutional monarchy in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Wakayama Prefecture Prefecture of Japan

Wakayama Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan on the Kii Peninsula in the Kansai region on Honshū island. The capital is the city of Wakayama.

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During the Edo period, the Kii branch of the Tokugawa clan had its castle at Wakayama. Its former ichinomiya shrine was Hinokuma Shrine.

Edo period period of Japanese history

The Edo period or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu. The period came to an end with the Meiji Restoration on May 3, 1868, after the fall of Edo.

Tokugawa shogunate Last feudal Japanese military government which existed between 1600 and 1868

The Tokugawa Shogunate, also known as the Tokugawa Bakufu (徳川幕府) and the Edo Bakufu (江戸幕府), was the last feudal Japanese military government, which existed between 1603 and 1867. The head of government was the shōgun, and each was a member of the Tokugawa clan. The Tokugawa shogunate ruled from Edo Castle and the years of the shogunate became known as the Edo period. This time is also called the Tokugawa period or pre-modern.

The Japanese bookshop chain Kinokuniya derives its name from the province.

Books Kinokuniya Japanese bookstore chain

Books Kinokuniya is a Japanese bookstore chain operated by Kinokuniya Company Ltd., founded in 1927, with its first store located in Shinjuku, Tokyo, Japan. It means "Bookstore of Kii Province". The company has its headquarters in Meguro, Tokyo.

Historical districts

Kaisō District, Wakayama district of Japan

Kaisō is a district located in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan.

Arida District, Wakayama district of Japan

Arida District is a district located in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan.

Hidaka District, Wakayama district of Wakayama prefecture, Japan

Hidaka District is a district located in Wakayama Prefecture, Japan.

Notes

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Kii Peninsula

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References

Commons-logo.svg Media related to Kii Province at Wikimedia Commons