King Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

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Sir John A. Macdonald statue, Gore Park SirJohnAMacStatue.JPG
Sir John A. Macdonald statue, Gore Park

King Street is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, also known as Highway 8. The western-end starts off in front of the McMaster University Medical Centre as a two-way street and passes through Westdale. At Paradise Road, King Street switches over to a one-way street (westbound) right through the city's core up to "the Delta", a spot in town where King and Main streets intersect. (West of the Delta, King Street is north of Main Street. East of the Delta after King crosses over Main Street, King then runs south of Main Street.) From the Delta onwards, King Street then switches over to become a two-way street again and ends at Highway 8 in Stoney Creek.

Hamilton, Ontario City in Ontario, Canada

Hamilton is a port city in the Canadian province of Ontario. An industrialized city in the Golden Horseshoe at the west end of Lake Ontario, Hamilton has a population of 536,917, and its census metropolitan area, which includes Burlington and Grimsby, has a population of 747,545. The city is about 40 miles (64 km) southwest of Toronto, with which the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) is formed.

King's Highway 8, commonly referred to as Highway 8, is a provincially maintained highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. At a length of 159.7 kilometres (99.2 mi), the route is significantly shorter than when it travelled beyond Hamilton to Niagara Falls. However, the Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) replaced the role of Highway 8 between those two cities, and that portion of the highway was subsequently transferred from provincial to local jurisdiction. Today the highway connects Hamilton and Cambridge, thereafter continuing through Southwestern Ontario to the community of Goderich on the shores of Lake Huron. The freeway segment of Highway 8 is known as the Freeport Diversion, King Street Bypass, or Highway 8 Expressway, with a short portion being internally designated by the province as Highway 7187. Highway 8 is multiplexed with Highway 7 including a portion of the Conestoga Parkway.

McMaster University Medical Centre Hospital in Ontario, Canada

The McMaster University Medical Centre (MUMC) is a major Ontario hospital with three key services: McMaster Children's Hospital, Women's Health Centre and Adult Outpatient Services. It is a teaching hospital in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It is a part of McMaster University, but operated by Hamilton Health Sciences. The hospital was recently ranked 2nd in Canada for research according to Research Infosource Inc.

Contents

History

Grand Lodge of Canada GrandLodgeOfCanada.JPG
Grand Lodge of Canada
Ellen Fairclough Building/ Hamilton Convention Centre EllenFaircloughBuildingA.JPG
Ellen Fairclough Building/ Hamilton Convention Centre
Standard Life Building & Sheraton Hamilton StandardLifeHamilton.JPG
Standard Life Building & Sheraton Hamilton
King Street West, looking East KingWestHamiltonBB.JPG
King Street West, looking East
Commerce Place Complex CommercePlaceHamilton.JPG
Commerce Place Complex

King Street follows the path of an old native trail; it was named for King George III. [1]

In 1815, George Hamilton, a settler and local politician, established a town site in the northern portion of the Barton Township. He kept several east-west roads which were originally Indian trails, but the north-south streets were on a regular grid pattern. Streets were designated "East" or "West" if they crossed James Street or Highway 6. Streets were designated "North" or "South" if they crossed King Street or Highway 8. [2]

James Street (Hamilton, Ontario) arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

James Street is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at the base of the Niagara Escarpment from James Mountain Road, a mountain-access road in the city, originally was a one-way street going south throughout but now has sections of it that are two-way. It extends north to the city's waterfront at the North End where it ends at Guise Street West right in front of the Harbour West Marina Complex and the Royal Hamilton Yacht Club.

Gore Park

Gore Park is located along two sections of King Street East from John Street and James Street.

In 1860, Edward, Prince of Wales (who later became King Edward VII) was in Hamilton to open up Gore Park (town centre) and the Crystal Palace. The Crystal Palace saw various Agricultural Exhibitions. It was modeled on the famous Crystal Palace designed and built in London, England. By 1891 the structure was in bad condition and decision was made to demolish it. All traces disappeared from the site which is now known as Victoria Park. [2]

In 1893, The Right House opened. It was Hamilton's first large department store. [3]

On 30 October 1893, The Sir John A. Macdonald Statue arrives in Hamilton from London, England. Official dedication of the statue took place 1 November 1893. Located at the intersection of King and Hughson Streets. Prime Minister Sir John Thompson in attendance. [4]

John A. Macdonald 1st Prime Minister of Canada

Sir John Alexander Macdonald was the first prime minister of Canada. The dominant figure of Canadian Confederation, he had a political career which spanned almost half a century.

Hughson Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

Hughson Street is a Lower City collector road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts at Charlton Avenue East at St. Joseph's hospital and runs north to Haymarket Street in the downtown where it's cut off by the Hamilton GO Transit station. Up to this point it is a two-way street. It then starts up again north of the station on Hunter Street East, where it then becomes a one-way street going north just past Barton Street East to Murray Street where it's cut off again by a parking lot for LIUNA Station. It then starts up again one block north past the CN railway tracks on Strachan Street and from this point onwards becomes a two-way street again that extends to the city's North End to the waterfront on Guise Street West, the site of the Canada Marine Discovery Centre and Pier 9.

John Sparrow David Thompson 4th Prime Minister of Canada

Sir John Sparrow David Thompson was a Canadian lawyer, judge, and politician who served as the fourth prime minister of Canada, in office from 1892 until his death. He had previously been premier of Nova Scotia for a brief period in 1882.

Hamilton Cenotaph

The Cenotaph at Veteran's Place at Gore Park was unveiled on May 22, 1923 by Governor General Viscount Byng who led Canadians into France and Flanders. The Cenotaph commemorates the 53,000 Canadian soldiers, 2,000 of them Hamiltonians, who were killed during the first World War. Hamilton's Cenotaph is a replica of the British Cenotaph in Westminster, London by Edwin Lutyens and Hamilton one was designed by William Russell Souter (1894–1971), a Hamilton architect, and World War I veteran. It consists of a huge granite column with an image of a casket at its summit. Two smaller columns are at its side with carved replicas of the equipment used by Canadian troops in the First World War.

Pantages Theatre

The Pantages Theatre opened up in 1921 on King Street, (between Catharine Street and Mary Street), with a seating capacity of 3,500 made it the largest theatre in Canada at the time. In 1930 it was renamed The Palace Theatre. It closed down in 1972. Hamilton one time was home to many Grand Theatres, all of which are no longer in existence. These include, Grand Opera House (James Street North), Savoy Theatre (Merrick Street), Temple Theatre (behind the Terminal Building on King Street), Lyric Theatre (Mary Street) and The Loews Theatre renamed later to The Capitol (King Street East). [5]

The Delta

In 1925 the first traffic lights in Canada went into operation at the Delta. (11 June 1925). [6]

McMaster University

McMaster University moved to Hamilton, Ontario from Toronto in 1930, thanks to the efforts of Thomas McQuesten. [7]

Christ the King Cathedral

Christ the King Cathedral, is a Roman Catholic church in Hamilton, Ontario Canada. The Cathedral was consecrated on December 19, 1933. The cathedral is perched atop a hill overlooking Highway 403 leading in towards the rest of Hamilton and one travelling towards Oakville, Missisauga and Toronto. [8]

CHCH TV

CHCH-TV 11 began broadcasting in 1954 as a CBC affiliate from a studio on King Street West (close to Victoria Park) and a transmitter located at 481 First Road West in Stoney Creek. At the time, all private stations were required to be CBC affiliates. [9] Then in 1961, CHCH disaffiliated from the CBC and became an independent TV station. [9] CHCH-TV 11 studios are now at the corner of Jackson Street West and Caroline Streets. The old studio building on King Street West is now the Westside Concert Theatre.

Terminal Towers

In 1966, Terminal Towers including a new eight-storey Holiday Inn opened on the site of the old transit terminal between King and Main at Catharine Street. It's now called Effort Square and the hotel is a Crowne Plaza. [10] Effort Square is also the home of the Lincoln Alexander Centre.

Architecture

Modern day architectural developments on King Street include the following, Phase 1 of Lloyd D. Jackson Square (mall) was completed, including Stelco Tower and Bank of Montreal Pavilion in 1972. [10] Then in 1977, the second phase of Jackson Square was completed along with a 9 storey office building called the Robert Thomson Building, but not the department st| roof = 103 m (338 ft)ore intended to be its major attraction. [10] Also in 1977, The Art Gallery of Hamilton opened beside the Board of Education building. [11] In 1981, The Hamilton Convention Centre and the government office tower above it opened. The tower was named the Ellen Fairclough Building one year later in 1982. [12] In 1983, the Standard Life Centre opened at the west end of Jackson Square. [10] In 1985, Sheraton Hamilton, connected to Jackson Square, opened, boosting downtown Hamilton's hotel space. [10] In 1985, Copps Coliseum, sports and entertainment arena with a capacity of up to 19,000 (depending on event type and configuration) opens its doors for business (one block North of King Street at Bay Street). It's named after the former Hamilton mayor, Victor K. Copps. [13] In 1987, the first of two reflective glass buildings of the CIBC tower (Commerce Place I) opened at King and James opposite Gore Park. The other (Commerce Place II) opened in 1990. [12]

Culture

Hamilton has hosted several cultural and craft fairs since the 1960s, notably Festival of Friends, which made it a major tourist destination. The Festival of Friends, founded in 1975, is the largest annual free music event in the country. Burton Cummings, Lighthouse and Bruce Cockburn have been among the main stage headliners at Gage Park on Gage Avenue. [14] WestJet is a major sponsor of the festival. [15] Hamilton is also home to the Mustard Festival because Hamilton is home to the largest miller of dry mustard in the world. It's held annually at Ferguson Station, Ferguson Avenue and King Street East at Hamilton's International Village and is another summertime food & beverage festival that features some of the top Blues and Jazz acts in the region. [16]

In 2001, the Steven Seagal film Exit Wounds used the streets of Downtown Hamilton for a period of 6-weeks during a night shoot of the movie's climatic chase scene that features the Gore Park water fountain and the Hamilton GO Transit station, Original site of the Toronto, Hamilton and Buffalo Railway (1892–1987).

Waterfront Shuttle

Route 99 - Waterfront Shuttle (seasonal) Hamilton Trolley Bus, Waterfront Shuttle.jpg
Route 99 - Waterfront Shuttle (seasonal)

The Waterfront Shuttle is a free service offered by the Hamilton Street Railway. It has a seasonal schedule that runs weekends from May-to-October connecting Hamilton's downtown core to the waterfront and attractions that can be found there like HMCS Haida and the Parks Canada Discovery Centre. The route circles Hamilton's downtown core around York Boulevard (north), Bay Street South (west), King Street West (south) and James Street North (east). Then it travels north along James Street and the Art District until it reaches the waterfront at Guise Street past the Royal Hamilton Yacht Club, Hamilton Chamber of Commerce and the Harbour West Marina Complex. Then the route hangs a left on Discovery Drive, the site of the Parks Canada Discovery Centre. Also at this site is the Hamilton Harbour Queen (cruise boat), Hamiltonian (tour boat) and the Hamilton Waterfront Trolley. [17]

Major intersections

Note: Listing of streets from West to East.

See also

Related Research Articles

Timeline of events in Hamilton, Ontario visit of Schooner Bluenose to Hamilton Harbour

Below is a timeline of events in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Culture of Hamilton, Ontario

Hamilton, Ontario's culture has built on its historical and social background. Interesting attractions include a museum of aircraft, HMCS Haida National Historic Site, historic naval ship; Canada's most famous warship and the last remaining Tribal Class in the world, a stately residence of a Prime Minister of Upper Canada, a functioning nuclear reactor at McMaster University, a horticultural haven, the Canadian Football Hall of Fame, African Lion Safari and Christ the King Cathedral.

Bay Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

Bay Street is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts at Inglewood Drive, just South of Aberdeen Avenue, as a collector road with only two lanes, then eventually becomes a six lane thoroughfare at its peak. Bay Street also passes through Downtown Hamilton, where many high-rise buildings are found. Bay Street is a one-way street from Aberdeen Avenue to Cannon Street West. Bay Street continues as an arterial route to Strachan Street, where it is downgraded to a neighbourhood collector and eventually ends at a curb at Pier 4 Park at Burlington Street in the city's North End.

MacNab Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

MacNab Street is a Lower City collector road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts in the Durand neighbourhood on Markland Street, as a one-way street going north to Bold Street, where it becomes two-way for one block until Hurst Place where it's cut off by a wall for the Hunter Street railway bridge. Pedestrians may cross Hunter Street at an underpass. MacNab Street starts again north of the Railway line on Hunter Street as a two-way street but is cut off again at King Street where the Lloyd D. Jackson Square mall and Stelco Tower are situated. MacNab Street continues north of this Mall on York Boulevard, in front of the Hamilton Public Library & the entrance to the Hamilton Farmer's Market, again as a two-way street right through the city's North End to Burlington Street. It continues as a one-way street to the waterfront where it ends at Guise Street West, the site of the Royal Hamilton Yacht Club and Pier 5.

John Street (Hamilton, Ontario) street in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

John Street is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Originally it was known as Mountain Road or Ancaster Road. It starts off at the base of Arkledun Avenue, a Mountain-access road in the city, just east of St. Joseph's Hospital, where it is a one-way street going north and tunnels underneath the Hunter Street Railway bridge and continues onward to the city's North End at the waterfront, where it ends at Guise Street East, the site of Pier 9.

Queen Street (Hamilton, Ontario) street in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Queen Street is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at Beckett Drive, a mountain-access road in the city and is a two-way street up to Herkimer Street and a one-way street (Southbound) the rest of the way north up to the Canadian National Railway Yard where the road turns right, merging with Stuart Street which travels in a west–east direction.

Catharine Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

Catharine Street is a Lower City collector road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at Charlton Avenue East at Woolverton Park in the Corktown neighbourhood as a one-way street (southbound), tunnels underneath the Hunter Street Railway bridge and stretches up to Barton Street East where it then turns two-way and cutoff by the CN Railway lines that cut through Strachan Street Park one block north past Barton. Catharine Street then resumes again on Strachan Street East, north of the Park again as a two-way road for 3 blocks and interrupted again at Picton Street East, the site of St. Lawrence Elementary School and resumes again north of this property on Macauley Street East, again as a two-way street for another 3 blocks where it's interrupted for a third time at Brock Street, the site of Eastwood Park and Eastwood Arena. Catherine Street resumes again north of Eastwood Park on Guise Street East and ends at the city's North End waterfront, the site of a Royal Canadian Navy base and Pier 9.

Ferguson Avenue (Hamilton, Ontario)

Ferguson Avenue is a Lower City collector road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It is a two-way street throughout that starts off at the base of the Mountain on Foster Street. It's interrupted 3 blocks north at Corktown Park where Canadian Pacific Railway lines passes through it. Ferguson Avenue resumes again north of the Park right before Hunter Street East, extending northward past Barton Street East through the city's North End industrial neighbourhood where it ends on Dock Service Road, the site of a Royal Canadian Navy base and Pier 10.

Gage Avenue (Hamilton, Ontario)

Gage Avenue is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at Lawrence Road at the base of the Niagara Escarpment (mountain) at the south end of Gage Park. It is a two-way arterial road that extends north through the city's North End industrial neighbourhood and ends at Industrial Drive.

Ottawa Street (Hamilton, Ontario)

Ottawa Street is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at Lawrence Road at the base of the Niagara Escarpment (mountain) and is a two-way street throughout, cutting through the Delta and Crown Point neighbourhoods and the City's North End industrial neighbourhood. It ends at Industrial Drive, the site of the Dofasco steel company. This used to be one of the east ends' mountain access roads - it continued south over the train tracks at Lawrence Road and quickly turned right towards the brick manufacturing plant once known as Hamilton Brick. It took several turns before joining what is now the Kenilworth Access near the old water reservoir entrance. Its routing up the mountain is fairly consistent with the current Kenilworth Access with one exception - another hair-pin turn at the top; not the traffic circle that is present now. It was because of these hair-pin turns that the Hamilton Street Railway discontinued bus service on this road in 1944, and why the City planned a new Kenilworth Access to the east which opened in 1957.

Kenilworth Avenue (Hamilton, Ontario)

Kenilworth Avenue, is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at the Kenilworth Traffic Circle and Kenilworth Access, a mountain-access road at the base of the Niagara Escarpment (mountain) and is a two-way street throughout stretching northward through the city's North End industrial neighbourhood where it then flows underneath the Burlington Street bridge and right into Dofasco's Industrial Park.

Cannon Street (Hamilton, Ontario) collector road in Hamilton, Ontario

Cannon Street, is a Lower City collector road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at Queen Street North as a one-way street (Westbound) up to Sherman Avenue North where it then switches over to a two-way street the rest of the way Eastward and ends just past Kenilworth Avenue North on Barons Avenue and merges with Britannia Avenue, a street that runs parallel with Cannon Street from Ottawa Street North to Barons Avenue.

Main Street (Hamilton, Ontario) Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

Main Street is a street in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

Jackson Street (Hamilton, Ontario) street in Hamilton, Ontario

Jackson Street, is a Lower City collector road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off West of Locke Street South at Jackson Playground as a one-way street (Westbound) up to Queen Street South where it then switches over to a two-way street and is interrupted at Bay Street South the site of the Hamilton City Hall and the Canadian Football Hall of Fame (museum), resumes again East of the property on MacNab Street South and then ends at Wellington Street South.

Aberdeen Avenue

Aberdeen Avenue is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off just West of Longwood Road South and East of Highway 403 as a two-way thoroughfare up to Queen Street South where it then switches over to a one-way collector road (Eastbound) to Bay Street South and then to another two-way section from Bay Street to James Mountain Road, a mountain-access road in the city near the base of the Niagara Escarpment (mountain).

York Boulevard Arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

York Boulevard is a Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Formerly known as Highway 2 and Highway 6, it starts in Burlington, Ontario at Plains Road West as a two-way arterial road that wraps around and over Hamilton Harbour, enters the city of Hamilton in the west end at Dundurn Park, and ends at James Street North. It has a one-way section from Queen Street to Bay Street North, and continues east of James Street North as Wilson Street.)

Cochrane Road (Hamilton, Ontario) street in Hamilton, Canada

Cochrane Road is a two-way Lower City collector road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. It starts off at the Queenston Traffic Circle and travels South between the Bartonville and Glenview neighbourhoods right through to the Rosedale neighbourhood where it ends at Greenhill Avenue in front of Rosedale Park. From this point onwards the road is now known as Whitehouse Road and weaves its way through King's Forest Golf Course and King's Forest Park.

Queenston Road is a two-way Lower City arterial road in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Also known as Highway 8. It starts off at the Queenston Traffic Circle and travels eastward over the Red Hill Valley Parkway and into Stoney Creek past the Fruitland and Winona communities and into Niagara Region as Niagara Regional Road 81.

References

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  2. 1 2 Bailey, Thomas Melville (1981). Dictionary of Hamilton Biography (Vol I, 1791-1875). W.L. Griffin Ltd.
  3. "Fast Facts from Hamilton's Past". Archived from the original on 2006-09-05. Retrieved 2013-07-09.
  4. "Sir John A. Macdonald statue, 1893 (www.myhamilton.ca)". Archived from the original on 2007-09-26. Retrieved 2007-04-08.
  5. Henley, Brian (1993). Hamilton our Lives and Times. The Hamilton Spectator. ISBN   0-9697255-0-7.
  6. Houghton, Margaret (2006). Vanished Hamilton Calendar. North Shore Publishing. ISBN   1-896899-39-0.
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  8. "Parish History". Archived from the original on 2007-02-05. Retrieved 2007-04-27.
  9. 1 2 "CH TV Hamilton History". Archived from the original on 2006-01-29. Retrieved 2007-04-08.
  10. 1 2 3 4 5 Johnston, Bill. "Hamilton Spectator article: "Lament for a Downtown"". Archived from the original on 2004-08-13. Retrieved 2007-04-08.
  11. Manson, Bill. "Gallery of distinction". Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-04-08.
  12. 1 2 "Skyscraperpage.com: Hamilton, Ontario" . Retrieved 2007-04-08.
  13. "OHL Arena Guide: Copps Coliseum (1985)" . Retrieved 2007-04-08.
  14. "The Hamilton Memory Project;" (Press release). The Hamilton Spectator- Tourism Hamilton page MP54. 2006-06-10.
  15. "WestJet sponsors Festival of Friends in Hamilton". Archived from the original on May 29, 2006. Retrieved 2007-04-08.
  16. "Hamilton's Annual Mustard Festival". Archived from the original on 2006-12-13. Retrieved 2007-04-08.
  17. "The Waterfront Shuttle (Trolley)- HSR" . Retrieved 2007-06-05.