Kingdom of Slavonia

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Kingdom of Slavonia

1699–1868
Flag of the Kingdom of Slavonia.svg
Flag
HRV Slavonia COA.svg
Coat of arms
Slavonia01.png
Kingdom of Slavonia in 1751, shown in yellow
Status Lands of the Hungarian Crown (1102–1868)a
Separate Habsburg land under joint civil-military administration (1699–1745), [1]
Constituent land of the Austrian Empire (1804–1868)a
Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen (1868-1918)
CapitalOsijek
Common languagesOfficial:
Latin
(until 1784; 1790–1847)
German
(1784–1790)
Croatian
(1847–1868)
Religion
GovernmentMonarchy
Ban (Viceroy) 
 1699–1703
Adam Batthyány (first)
 1867–1868
Levin Rauch (last)
Legislature Sabor
Historical era Early modern period
26 January 1699
15 March 1848
26 September 1868
Area
18689,246 km2 (3,570 sq mi)
Population
 1868
381,480
Currency Gulden
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Flag of the Ottoman Empire.svg Sanjak of Pojega
Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia Flag of Croatia-Slavonia.svg
Today part of Croatia
Serbia
A: Subordinate to the Kingdom of Croatia (1745–1849), autonomous part of the Kingdom of Croatia and the Austrian Empire (1849–1868)
Kingdom of Slavonia in 1849 Slavonia02.png
Kingdom of Slavonia in 1849

The Kingdom of Slavonia (Croatian : Kraljevina Slavonija, Latin : Regnum Sclavoniae, Hungarian : Szlavón Királyság, German : Königreich Slawonien) was a province of the Habsburg Monarchy and the Austrian Empire that existed from 1699 to 1868. The province included northern parts of present-day regions of Slavonia (today in Croatia) and Syrmia (today in Serbia and Croatia). The southern parts of these regions were part of the Slavonian Military Frontier, which was a section of the Military Frontier.

Contents

Geography

The Kingdom of Slavonia was bounded by the Kingdom of Croatia to the west, the Kingdom of Hungary to the north and the east, and by the Ottoman Empire to the south. Together with the Slavonian Military Frontier it had about 6600 sq. miles. It was divided into the three counties of Požega, Virovitica and Syrmia. Besides a chain of mountains in the middle of the province, the remaining part of Slavonian Kingdom consisted of fertile eminences planted with vines and fruit trees and extensive plains. [2]

History

The Kingdom of Slavonia was formed from territories that Habsburg Monarchy gained from Ottoman Empire by the Treaty of Karlowitz (1699), that ended the Great Turkish War. Initially, it was a separate Habsburg land under joint civil-military administration that lasted from 1699 to 1745. [3] The inhabitants were exempted from taxes, but were bound to military service. [2] In 1745, the full civil administration was introduced and Kingdom of Slavonia, as one of the Lands of the Hungarian Crown, was administratively included into both Kingdom of Croatia and Kingdom of Hungary. Following the 1868 Settlement ( Nagodba ) with the Kingdom of Hungary, Kingdom of Slavonia was joined with Kingdom of Croatia into the single Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia, which although it was under the suzerainty of the Crown of Saint Stephen kept a significant level of self-rule.

Population

After the end of the Great Turkish War, Slavonia was left desolated as around 80% of its pre-war population fled. In order to improve its demographics, people that fled from Slavonia and whose property was taken by the Ottomans were allowed to return to their lands if they had valid ownership documents. [4] Settlers from Bosnia also started migrating to Slavonia, fleeing from the Ottomans. In 1691 around 22,300 Catholics from Bosnian Posavina moved to Slavonia. [5] It is estimated that around 40,000 people lived in Slavonia in 1696. [6] In 1698 its population increased to 80,000.

The 1802 Austrian population data for the Kingdom of Slavonia recorded 148,000 (51.6%) Catholics, 135,000 (47.2%) Orthodox and 3,500 (1.2%) Protestants. [7]

According to other statistical estimations, in 1787 in civil Slavonia there were 265,670 inhabitants, and in 1804/1805 there were 286,349 inhabitants, but from that number clergy and nobility were excluded. Only men were counted in that census. There were: 74,671 Roman Catholics, 68,390 Orthodox Christians, 1,744 Calvinists, 97 Lutherans and 160 Jews. Number of Orthodox Christians was higher in Syrmia: 32,090 Orthodox Christians and 12,633 Roman Catholics. In other two counties of Slavonia: Požega and Virovitica, as in city of Požega, Roman Catholics outnumbered Orthodox population.

The official Austrian census of 1857 for Kingdom of Slavonia gives the following results (a section of Syrmia was in 1857 part of the Voivodeship of Serbia and Banat of Temeschwar): [8]

Požega County

Osijek County

Economy

The Kingdom of Slavonia was mostly an agricultural land, just like the Kingdom of Croatia, and it was known for its silk production. Agriculture and the breeding of cattle were the most profitable occupations of the inhabitants. It produced corn of all kinds, hemp, flax, tobacco, and great quantities of liquorice. The quantity of wine produced was also large, especially in the county of Srem. In 1857 industrial employment (11.01%) was highest in the County of Osijek, while 72.3% were employed in agriculture (82.9% in the Požega County). [9] [2]

See also

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The Bjelovar-Križevci County was a historic administrative subdivision (županija) of the Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia. Croatia-Slavonia was an autonomous kingdom within the Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen (Transleithania), the Hungarian part of the dual Austro-Hungarian Empire. Its territory is now in northern Croatia. Belovár and Kőrös are the Hungarian names for the cities Bjelovar and Križevci, respectively. The capital of the county was Bjelovar.

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References

  1. John R. Lampe (1982). John R. Lampe; Marvin R. Jackson (eds.). Balkan economic history, 1550–1950: from imperial borderlands to developing nations. Indiana University Press. p. 63. ISBN   978-0-2533-0368-4.
  2. 1 2 3 Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge: The Penny Cyclopaedia of the Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, vol 22, p. 100-101
  3. Balkan economic history, 1550-1950: from imperial borderlands to developing nations, John R. Lampe, Marvin R. Jackson, Indiana University Press, 1982, page 63.
  4. Ive Mažuran – Osnivanje vojne granice u Slavoniji 1702. godine, p. 34
  5. Andrija Zirdum – Počeci naselja i stanovništvo brodskog i gradiškog kraja 1698-1991, Slavonski Brod, 2001, p. 23
  6. Andrija Zirdum – Počeci naselja i stanovništvo brodskog i gradiškog kraja 1698-1991, Slavonski Brod, 2001, p. 24
  7. Mladen Lorković, Narod i zemlja Hrvata, reprint, Split, 2005., page 86
  8. Statistische übersichten über die bevölkerung und den viehstand von Österreich nach der zählung vom 31. october 1857, page 120
  9. Mariann Nagy - Croatia in the Economic Structure of the Habsburg Empire in the Light of the 1857 Census, page 88

Literature