Kitikmeot Region

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Kitikmeot Region
Qitirmiut ᕿᑎᕐᒥᐅᑦ
Communities of the Kitikmeot
Kitikmeot Region, Nunavut.svg
Location in Nunavut
CountryCanada
Territory Nunavut
Regional centre Cambridge Bay
Area
  Total443,277.47 km2 (171,150.39 sq mi)
Population
  Total6,543
  Density0.015/km2 (0.038/sq mi)

Kitikmeot Region ( /ˈkɪtəkmjt/ ; [1] Inuktitut: Qitirmiutᕿᑎᕐᒥᐅᑦ[ pronunciation? ]) is an administrative region of Nunavut, Canada. It consists of the southern and eastern parts of Victoria Island with the adjacent part of the mainland as far as the Boothia Peninsula, together with King William Island and the southern portion of Prince of Wales Island. The regional centre is Cambridge Bay (population 1,766; [2] ).

Contents

Before 1999, Kitikmeot Region existed under slightly different boundaries as Kitikmeot Region, Northwest Territories.

Transportation

Cambridge Bay in May Aerial view of Cambridge Bay in May.JPG
Cambridge Bay in May

Access to the territorial capital of Iqaluit is difficult and expensive as the only direct flight is from Cambridge Bay, which began during the COVID-19 pandemic in Canada. For example, Iqaluit is approximately 1,069 km (664 mi) from Kugaaruk, the closest Kitikmeot community. A one-way flight to the capital costs between $2,691 and $2,911 (as of November 2016) [3] [4] and involves flying to, along with an overnight stay in, Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, approximately 1,310 km (810 mi) southwest of Kugaaruk—in total, a trip of about 3,627 km (2,254 mi). As is the case for the rest of Nunavut, there is no road access to the region and all places are fly-in. All five hamlets have certified airports: Cambridge Bay Airport, Gjoa Haven Airport, Kugaaruk Airport, Kugluktuk Airport and Taloyoak Airport, with scheduled flights by Canadian North and First Air. [5]

Street in Gjoa Haven Gjoa Haven.jpg
Street in Gjoa Haven

There are also four registered aerodromes in the region. Cambridge Bay Water Aerodrome is a floatplane base open in the summer only. George Lake Aerodrome, an ice runway is only open from January to April, and serves the Back River Gold Project. Goose Lake Aerodrome also serves the Back River Gold Project and has both ice and gravel runways. Hope Bay Aerodrome serves the Hope Bay mine site and is a gravel runway. The former Doris Lake Aerodrome, was a 7,894 ft (2,406 m) ice runway, and was the longest in the region, it served the Doris Lake mine. [5]

Hamlet of Kugaaruk View of Kugaaruk.jpg
Hamlet of Kugaaruk

Climate

The Kitikmeot Region has a harsh subarctic climate (Köppen climate classification Dfc) and a tundra climate (Dfc) with long, very cold winters and short, cool summers.

Climate data for Kugluktuk (Kugluktuk Airport)
WMO ID: 71938; coordinates 67°49′00″N115°08′38″W / 67.81667°N 115.14389°W / 67.81667; -115.14389 (Baie-Kugluktuk Airport) ; elevation: 22.6 m (74 ft); 1981–2010 normals, extremes 1930–present [lower-alpha 1]
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high °C (°F)0.8
(33.4)
1.1
(34.0)
0.0
(32.0)
9.8
(49.6)
23.3
(73.9)
32.5
(90.5)
34.9
(94.8)
30.3
(86.5)
26.1
(79.0)
13.9
(57.0)
4.4
(39.9)
−0.5
(31.1)
34.9
(94.8)
Average high °C (°F)−23.2
(−9.8)
−23.4
(−10.1)
−20.7
(−5.3)
−11.4
(11.5)
−1.3
(29.7)
9.9
(49.8)
15.6
(60.1)
13.1
(55.6)
6.5
(43.7)
−3.5
(25.7)
−14.8
(5.4)
−20.3
(−4.5)
−6.1
(21.0)
Daily mean °C (°F)−27.3
(−17.1)
−27.7
(−17.9)
−25.3
(−13.5)
−16.3
(2.7)
−5.3
(22.5)
5.5
(41.9)
10.9
(51.6)
9.0
(48.2)
3.3
(37.9)
−6.6
(20.1)
−18.7
(−1.7)
−24.5
(−12.1)
−10.3
(13.5)
Average low °C (°F)−31.4
(−24.5)
−32.0
(−25.6)
−29.8
(−21.6)
−21.2
(−6.2)
−9.2
(15.4)
1.0
(33.8)
6.1
(43.0)
4.8
(40.6)
0.1
(32.2)
−9.8
(14.4)
−22.6
(−8.7)
−28.6
(−19.5)
−14.4
(6.1)
Record low °C (°F)−47.8
(−54.0)
−50.0
(−58.0)
−48.9
(−56.0)
−43.9
(−47.0)
−30.2
(−22.4)
−15.0
(5.0)
−0.8
(30.6)
−4.4
(24.1)
−20.0
(−4.0)
−35.4
(−31.7)
−41.1
(−42.0)
−45.0
(−49.0)
−50.0
(−58.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches)10.4
(0.41)
8.4
(0.33)
9.9
(0.39)
10.0
(0.39)
14.6
(0.57)
16.6
(0.65)
44.5
(1.75)
45.1
(1.78)
37.8
(1.49)
26.5
(1.04)
13.0
(0.51)
10.4
(0.41)
247.2
(9.73)
Average rainfall mm (inches)0.1
(0.00)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.1
(0.00)
4.3
(0.17)
14.6
(0.57)
44.4
(1.75)
44.9
(1.77)
31.4
(1.24)
4.7
(0.19)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
144.5
(5.69)
Average snowfall cm (inches)19.6
(7.7)
16.3
(6.4)
19.4
(7.6)
18.2
(7.2)
16.2
(6.4)
2.1
(0.8)
0.0
(0.0)
0.2
(0.1)
7.7
(3.0)
35.0
(13.8)
25.5
(10.0)
21.9
(8.6)
182.1
(71.7)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm)8.98.710.08.27.57.611.513.312.814.311.19.7123.4
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm)0.00.00.00.21.96.811.513.110.52.30.00.046.4
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm)10.510.111.69.57.21.30.10.23.714.513.411.693.6
Average relative humidity (%) (at 1500 LST)76.775.177.582.383.170.264.869.875.584.780.977.876.5
Mean monthly sunshine hours 17.877.3160.3233.3246.7375.0341.6207.791.151.219.60.21,821.7
Percent possible sunshine 17.735.544.449.638.752.148.538.522.817.612.70.731.6
Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23]
Climate data for Cambridge Bay (Cambridge Bay Airport)
WMO ID: 71925; coordinates 69°06′29″N105°08′18″W / 69.10806°N 105.13833°W / 69.10806; -105.13833 (Cambridge Bay Airport) ; elevation: 31.1 m (102 ft); 1981–2010 normals
MonthJanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDecYear
Record high humidex −5.0−9.7−4.13.910.525.330.828.616.35.8−1.4−3.530.8
Record high °C (°F)−4.9
(23.2)
−9.4
(15.1)
−4.0
(24.8)
6.1
(43.0)
11.5
(52.7)
23.3
(73.9)
28.9
(84.0)
26.1
(79.0)
16.4
(61.5)
6.9
(44.4)
0.0
(32.0)
−3.4
(25.9)
28.9
(84.0)
Average high °C (°F)−28.5
(−19.3)
−28.9
(−20.0)
−25.3
(−13.5)
−16.3
(2.7)
−5.6
(21.9)
5.8
(42.4)
12.8
(55.0)
9.8
(49.6)
2.5
(36.5)
−7.3
(18.9)
−18.8
(−1.8)
−24.9
(−12.8)
−10.4
(13.3)
Daily mean °C (°F)−32.0
(−25.6)
−32.5
(−26.5)
−29.3
(−20.7)
−20.8
(−5.4)
−9.3
(15.3)
2.7
(36.9)
8.9
(48.0)
6.8
(44.2)
0.3
(32.5)
−10.4
(13.3)
−22.3
(−8.1)
−28.3
(−18.9)
−13.9
(7.0)
Average low °C (°F)−35.4
(−31.7)
−36.1
(−33.0)
−33.2
(−27.8)
−25.3
(−13.5)
−13.0
(8.6)
−0.3
(31.5)
4.9
(40.8)
3.8
(38.8)
−1.9
(28.6)
−13.5
(7.7)
−25.7
(−14.3)
−31.8
(−25.2)
−17.3
(0.9)
Record low °C (°F)−52.8
(−63.0)
−50.6
(−59.1)
−48.3
(−54.9)
−42.8
(−45.0)
−35.0
(−31.0)
−17.8
(0.0)
−1.7
(28.9)
−8.9
(16.0)
−17.2
(1.0)
−33.0
(−27.4)
−43.9
(−47.0)
−49.4
(−56.9)
−52.8
(−63.0)
Record low wind chill −73.4−72.6−69.8−60.1−43.2−29.2−7.9−13.1−28.6−49.4−60.7−66.3−73.4
Average precipitation mm (inches)5.8
(0.23)
4.9
(0.19)
7.1
(0.28)
5.7
(0.22)
7.0
(0.28)
13.6
(0.54)
24.1
(0.95)
25.7
(1.01)
19.1
(0.75)
14.7
(0.58)
8.0
(0.31)
6.1
(0.24)
141.7
(5.58)
Average rainfall mm (inches)0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
1.0
(0.04)
10.0
(0.39)
23.9
(0.94)
23.9
(0.94)
12.7
(0.50)
0.6
(0.02)
0.0
(0.0)
0.0
(0.0)
72.1
(2.84)
Average snowfall cm (inches)6.7
(2.6)
5.9
(2.3)
8.4
(3.3)
6.9
(2.7)
7.2
(2.8)
3.8
(1.5)
0.1
(0.0)
1.8
(0.7)
6.8
(2.7)
15.9
(6.3)
9.8
(3.9)
6.8
(2.7)
80.2
(31.6)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.2 mm)7.36.89.26.87.18.010.713.111.912.19.07.9109.8
Average rainy days (≥ 0.2 mm)0.00.00.00.00.95.910.712.57.10.60.00.037.8
Average snowy days (≥ 0.2 cm)7.46.99.87.17.33.40.11.26.312.59.58.379.8
Average relative humidity (%)65.366.470.576.283.877.268.273.682.386.276.570.074.7
Mean monthly sunshine hours 7.373.7169.6275.9245.1291.6333.8186.671.756.817.60.01,729.7
Percent possible sunshine 11.735.447.157.736.640.545.933.617.820.013.50.030.0
Source: Environment and Climate Change Canada Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010 [24]

Politics

The region is home to the only two communities in Nunavut that voted "no" in the 1982 division plebiscite: Cambridge Bay and Kugluktuk. [25]

Taloyoak Taloyoak 01.jpg
Taloyoak

The region has four electoral districts;

Former districts include Akulliq, which covered Kugaaruk and Naujaat in the Kivalliq Region. It was the ony electoral district in Nunavut to cross two regions. Nattilik, which covered Gjoa Haven and Taloyoak. The previous incumbent was the former federal Minister of Health, Leona Aglukkaq.

In 2007 at their AGM, Bob Lyall, a board member of the Kitikmeot Inuit Association, suggested the formation of a political party called the Bloc Kitikmeot to run in the next general election and to advocate for a separate Kitikmeot Territory. Bobby Lyall, along with his brother Kitikmeot Corporation president, Charlie Lyall and delegates Martina and Connie Kapolak, argued that the Government of Nunavut had spent most of the infrastructure money available from the federal government in the Baffin Region (Qikiqtaaluk Region). [26] However, the party was not formed and consequently no members ran for a seat in the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut which continues to run as a consensus government.

Communities

Hamlets

Other

Protected areas

Demographics

In the 2021 Census of Population conducted by Statistics Canada, the Kitikmeot Region had a population of 6,458 living in 1,677 of its 1,954 total private dwellings, a change of

The Kitikmeot Region also doubles as one of three census divisions in Nunavut, the others being the Kivalliq [35] (also known as the Keewatin) and the Qikiqtaaluk [36] (also known as the Baffin) regions. Of the three the Kitikmeot is the smallest in size being 1,343.8 km2 (518.8 sq mi) smaller than the Kivalliq. [35] [37] It has the smallest population and is the least densely populated of the three. The population is predominantly Inuit (90.0%) with 0.7% other aboriginal peoples, 0.3% North American Indian and 0.4% Métis, and 9.3% non-Aboriginals. [38]

Notes

  1. Climate data was recorded at Coppermine from October 1930 to November 1977 and at Kugluktuk Airport from December 1977 to present.

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Demographics of Nunavut

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William Lyall, known as Bill Lyall, of Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, Canada, was a territorial politician. Lyall was elected to the 8th Northwest Territories Legislative Assembly in the 1975 election.

Enuk Pauloosie was a Canadian politician, who was elected as the Member of the Legislative Assembly for the electoral district of Nattilik in the Legislative Assembly of Nunavut in the 2008 territorial election. His riding of Nattilik encompasses the communities of Gjoa Haven, Nunavut and Taloyoak, Nunavut.

References

  1. Kitikmeot Students Thank You 2013 (February 22, 2013).
  2. 1 2 "2016 Community Profiles Csmbridg Bay" . Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  3. Google - First Air
  4. Google - Canadian North
  5. 1 2 Canada Flight Supplement. Effective 0901 Z 16 July 2020 to 0901Z 10 September 2020.
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  8. "December 1934". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
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  10. "February 1943". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  11. "October 1943". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  12. "January 1947". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  13. "November 1948". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  14. "March 1949". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  15. "May 1952". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  16. "March 1955". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  17. "September 1957". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  18. "April 1958". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  19. "February 1968". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  20. "September 1970". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  21. "November 1970". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300900. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  22. "June 2013". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300902. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  23. "August 2013". Canadian Climate Data. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2300902. Retrieved June 25, 2016.
  24. "Cambridge Bay A *". Canadian Climate Normals 1981–2010. Environment and Climate Change Canada. Climate ID: 2400600. Retrieved April 30, 2014.
  25. Detailed Break down of Plebiscite results
  26. Jane George (October 26, 2007). "What's next? The new territory of Kitikmeot?". Nunatsiaq News . Retrieved October 5, 2009.
  27. "2016 Community Profiles Gjoa Haven" . Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  28. "2016 Community Profiles Kugaaruk" . Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  29. "2016 Community Profiles Kugluktuk" . Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  30. "Census Profile, 2016 Census Taloyoak". Statistics Canada. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  31. "Census Profile, 2016 Census Bathurst Inlet". Statistics Canada. Retrieved March 4, 2017.
  32. "Census Profile, 2016 Census Umingmaktok". Statistics Canada. Retrieved March 4, 2017.
  33. "Census Profile, 2016 Census Kitikmeot, Unorganized". Statistics Canada. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  34. "Population and dwelling counts: Canada and census divisions". Statistics Canada. February 9, 2022. Retrieved April 3, 2022.
  35. 1 2 2011 Canada Census Kivalliq Region
  36. 2011 Canada Census Qikiqtaaluk Region
  37. "Census Profile, 2016 Census Kitikmeot, Region". Statistics Canada. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  38. 2011 Aboriginal Population Profile

Further reading

Coordinates: 68°55′N100°45′W / 68.917°N 100.750°W / 68.917; -100.750 (Kitikmeot Region)