Knaptoft

Last updated

Knaptoft is a civil parish in the Harborough district of Leicestershire, England, with a population of around 50. The population was still less the 100 at the 2011 census and the population is now included in the civil parish of Mowsley. It is also a deserted village in this parish. Knaptoft is just off the A5199 near Husbands Bosworth. Knaptoft House Farm is a nearby bed and breakfast and stud farm. The medieval fish ponds were restored from 1976 to 1982 and are now run commercially.

Contents

History

The village was deserted in the 17th century, and the only visible remains are some farm buildings and a ruined parish church. It is recorded in the Domesday Book as Cnapetot. Cnape could refer to either a personal name, or derive from either the Old Norwegian word Knappr meaning a hilltop or the Old English word Cnap meaning a young servant boy (Old Norse Knapi). Toft is believed to derive from the Old Scandinavian toft which means homestead.

In 1301 the village was known to comprise a manor, a windmill, 2 fish ponds and 20 tenants. By 1624 only the manor and 5 labourers remained. The depopulation was due to the enclosure of the land for sheep pasture, which required less labour.

The present day farmhouse Knaptoft Hall Farm is thought to be on the site of the old manor. The manor was held by the Horton family from 1279 to 1761. The first of this line was Henry de Horton who became a free tenant in 1279 and built the manor next to the church. The manor was demolished in 1761 and a new house built on the site.

The Church of Saint Nicholas is now roofless but still contains headstones and the stone font. It is thought to have been sacked and destroyed by Oliver Cromwell's Roundhead forces after the Battle of Naseby in June 1645 whilst in pursuit of the fleeing defeated Royalist army. Certainly a skirmish occurred here, confirmed by archaeological finds. The church is said to be haunted. Church services are still held at the church at 3pm on the third Sunday of June, July, August and September.

The ancient parish included the chapelries of Shearsby and Mowsley and the hamlet of Walton in Knaptoft, all of which became separate civil parishes in 1866. [1]

Related Research Articles

Quarrendon Human settlement in England

Quarrendon is a deserted medieval village and former civil parish on the outskirts of Aylesbury in Buckinghamshire, England. Today its name is also associated with the modern housing estate of Quarrendon beyond the parish boundary in Aylesbury. The parish has now been renamed Berryfields, the name of a housing development within the boundary.

Horton, Berkshire Human settlement in England

Horton is a village and civil parish in Berkshire, England. It is between Windsor and Staines-upon-Thames.

Horton is a hamlet in the parish of Ivinghoe, in Buckinghamshire, England. It is in the civil parish of Slapton.

Loughton, Milton Keynes Human settlement in England

Loughton is an ancient village, modern district in the civil parish of Loughton and Great Holm in Milton Keynes, Buckinghamshire, England. The village spreads between Watling Street and the modern A5 road, to the west of, and about 1 mile from, the city centre.

Bishops Cannings Human settlement in England

Bishops Cannings is a village and civil parish in the Vale of Pewsey in Wiltshire, England, about 3 miles (5 km) northeast of Devizes. The parish includes the village of Coate and the hamlets of Bourton, Horton and Little Horton.

Archdeacon Newton Human settlement in England

Archdeacon Newton is a hamlet and rural parish of several farms in the borough of Darlington and the ceremonial county of County Durham, in England. The population taken at the 2011 Census was less than 100. Details are maintained in the parish of Walworth. It is associated with an abandoned village site under pasture and farm buildings, and situated a short distance to the north-west of Darlington. The lost settlement was in existence by the early 15th century, and remained inhabited at least until the 1890s. There was a moated manor house at the southern end, part of which remains as the Old Hall, now a barn. At the north end of the site was the chapel, and in the middle were tofts and enclosures, with a ridge and furrow field and a trackway leading to the south-east. The site of the abandoned village is now a scheduled monument and the Old Hall is a listed building.

Fishtoft Human settlement in England

Fishtoft is one of eighteen civil parishes which, together with Boston, form the Borough of Boston in the county of Lincolnshire, England. Local government has been arranged in this way since the reorganization of 1 April 1974, which resulted from the Local Government Act 1972. This parish forms an electoral ward in itself. Hitherto, the parish had formed part of Boston Rural District, in the Parts of Holland. Holland was one of the three divisions of the traditional county of Lincolnshire. Since the Local Government Act of 1888, Holland had been in most respects, a county in itself. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 6,835.

Mowsley Human settlement in England

Mowsley, pronounced "mowzley" is a small village in the south part of Leicestershire. The modern village has just under 100 dwellings. The population at the 2011 census was 302.

Syresham Human settlement in England

Syresham is a village and civil parish in the English district of South Northamptonshire. The civil parish population at the 2011 census was 855. It is near Brackley town and close to Silverstone Circuit. It is surrounded by villages and hamlets such as Biddlesden, Whitfield, Helmdon, Silverstone and Wappenham, and the border with Buckinghamshire lies just to the south of the village. The border itself is defined by the River Great Ouse, which rises within the parish. There are two small hamlets in the parish: Crowfield and Pimlico.

Horton, Gloucestershire Human settlement in England

Horton is a village on the Cotswold Edge, in Gloucestershire, England. It is about 2½ miles north of Chipping Sodbury. The nearest settlement is Little Sodbury, about 1½ miles away; Hawkesbury Upton and Dunkirk are both 2½ miles away. It is a linear settlement built on the slopes of a steep hill.

Croxton, Cambridgeshire Human settlement in England

Croxton is a village and civil parish about 13 miles (21 km) west of Cambridge in South Cambridgeshire, England. In 2001, the resident population was 163 people, falling slightly to 160 at the 2011 Census. Croxton Park is to the south of the current village and contains a large house and parkland.

Egmanton Village and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, England

Egmanton is a small village and civil parish in Nottinghamshire, England, and is located one mile south of Tuxford and one mile north of Laxton. The population of the civil parish taken at the 2011 Census was 286. The name derives from the Old English words for Ecgmund's farm/settlement.

Martin, Hampshire Human settlement in England

Martin is a village and civil parish in the New Forest district in Hampshire. The nearest town Fordingbridge is 7 miles (11 km) to the southeast, and the cathedral city of Salisbury is 12 miles (19 km) to the northeast.

Horton, Staffordshire Village in Staffordshire, England, UK

Horton is a village and civil parish in the English county of Staffordshire. The population of the civil parish as taken at the 2011 census was 781. It is situated about 3 miles (5 km) W of Leek.

Chesterton, Warwickshire Human settlement in England

Chesterton is a small village in Warwickshire, England. The population of the civil parish taken at the 2011 census was 123. It is about five miles south of Leamington Spa, near the villages of Harbury and Lighthorne.

Seacourt Human settlement in England

Seacourt is a deserted medieval village near Botley in Oxfordshire. It was part of Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes transferred it to Oxfordshire.

Toft, Cambridgeshire Human settlement in England

Toft is a village situated in Cambridgeshire, England. It is approximately six miles to the west of Cambridge, and is situated within four miles of the M11 motorway. It has approximately 600 residents and 200 homes. Comberton Village College and Comberton Sixth Form fall within the Toft Parish boundary. The village has two churches, St Andrew's Parish Church and Toft Methodist Church.

Great Humby Human settlement in England

Great Humby is a hamlet in the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It lies in the civil parish of Ropsley and Humby, 6 miles (9.7 km) east from Grantham, 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south-east from Ropsley and 3 miles (4.8 km) south from the A52. Little Humby, a larger hamlet, is 720 yards (658.4 m) to the north. It is in the civil parish of Ropsley and Humby.

Toft, Lincolnshire Human settlement in England

Toft is a small village in the South Kesteven district of Lincolnshire, England. It is situated approximately 2 miles (3 km) south-west from Bourne on the A6121. Toft is part of the civil parish of Toft with Lound and Manthorpe. The population of the civil parish at the 2011 census was 333.

Horton-cum-Studley Human settlement in England

Horton-cum-Studley is a village and civil parish in Oxfordshire about 6 12 miles (10.5 km) northeast of the centre of Oxford and bordering Otmoor, and is one of the "Seven Towns" of Otmoor. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 455.

References

Coordinates: 52°30′03″N1°04′40″W / 52.50071°N 1.07778°W / 52.50071; -1.07778