Kohai Grace

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Kohai Grace
Born1966 (age 5556)
New Zealand
EducationWellington Arts Centre. Te Wānanga o Raukawa, Bachelor of Design and Art. Massey University, Masters (Māori Visual Arts).
Known forWeaving, teaching
Style Māori weaving
Relatives Patricia Grace (mother) [1]

Kohai Grace (born 1966) is a New Zealand weaver. Her iwi are Ngāti Toa Rangatira, Ngāti Porou, Te Āti Awa and Ngāti Raukawa. [2] [3]

Contents

Biography

Grace learnt weaving under Kataraina Hetet-Winiata at the Wellington Arts Centre. [2] [4] She also learned under the esteemed Rangi Hetet and Erenora Puketapu-Hetet whilst completing a Bachelor of Design and Art at Te Wānanga o Raukawa. She holds a Masters in Māori Visual Arts from Massey University. [5]

From 1998 to 2005 Grace was a weaving teacher at Te Wānanga o Raukawa. [4]

In 2008, she was the de Young Museum's artist-in-residence in San Francisco, which coincided with the event Māori Art Meets America. [6] [7]

Works

Her weaving is based upon customary practice and the use of natural materials and has been described as having a "strong contemporary edge". [4] [8] Her work has been included in international exhibitions such as E tū Ake [9] which toured to Musée du quai Branly, Paris and Museo de las Culturas, Mexico City. [10] Her work is also held in the collection of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. [11] [12]

In 1990, she was commissioned by the National Library of New Zealand to produce tukutuku (woven panels) for the Nga Kupu Korero exhibition which toured the country and focused on issues surrounding the Treaty of Waitangi, 150 years after its signing. [3]

Two festivals Grace has participated in are the Island to Island Festival, Tasmania in 2001, and the Festival of Pacific Arts, Palau in 2004. [4]

In 2004, she presented the Tui Cloak, [13] a garment made with harakeke and inspired by the white throat feathers of the Tui bird. [14]

In 2007, her garment Wahine o te Pō won awards at Style Pasifika in Auckland in 2007, and was in the New Zealand Fashion Museum exhibition Black in Fashion: Wearing the colour black in New Zealand. [15]

Exhibitions

Awards

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References

  1. Catherall, Sarah (8 May 2021). "Patricia Grace turns her pen on herself". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 11 August 2021.
  2. 1 2 Tamati-Quennell, Megan (1993). Pū Manawa. Wellington: Huia Publishers. ISBN   0-909010-00-5.
  3. 1 2 3 Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision (12 May 2009). "He Maumaharatanga: A Woven Tribute". The Big Idea. Retrieved 14 January 2015.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Hakaraia, Libby; Waata Urlich, Colleen, eds. (2008). Te kāhui o Matariki : contemporary Māori art for Matariki. North Shore City, N.Z.: Raupo. ISBN   978-0-14-300934-4. OCLC   213382039.
  5. "Kohai Grace » Te Auaha". 22 January 2019. Archived from the original on 22 January 2019. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  6. "Toi Māori celebrated in San Francisco". Creative New Zealand. 29 October 2008. Archived from the original on 8 February 2015.
  7. "Arts on Sunday: Kohai Grace". Radio New Zealand National. 2 November 2008. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  8. 1 2 Swarbrick, Nancy. "Creative life - Visual arts and crafts". Te Ara – the Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  9. 1 2 "Experience Te Papa's New Touring Māori Exhibition | Te Papa". 29 January 2019. Archived from the original on 29 January 2019. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  10. Smith, Huhana (2011). E Tū Ake: Māori Standing Strong. Wellington: Te Papa Press. ISBN   9781877385698.
  11. "Kohai Grace | Collections Online - Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa". collections.tepapa.govt.nz. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  12. "2008–2012 past touring exhibitions | Te Papa". 25 January 2019. Archived from the original on 25 January 2019. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  13. "Tūī cloak' woven garment - Part of Taonga Māori collection, Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa". collections.tepapa.govt.nz. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  14. Miriama Evans; Ranui Ngarimu (2005). Aho Mutunga Kore. Huia Publishers. p. 74. ISBN   9781869691615.
  15. 1 2 "Wahine o te Pō". New Zealand Fashion Museum. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  16. "Mäori [sic] Visual Arts celebrates ten years at Massey". Massey University. 23 November 2005. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  17. "New Zealand Fashion Museum". www.nzfashionmuseum.org.nz. Retrieved 16 November 2019.
  18. "The Call of Taranaki: reo Karanga o Taranaki". Puke Ariki. 2013. Archived from the original on 5 November 2018. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  19. "Turuturu". Pataka Art + Museum. 2016. Archived from the original on 28 January 2016. Retrieved 12 November 2019.
  20. "Retro Influence With Contemporary Design | Scoop News". 16 November 2019. Archived from the original on 16 November 2019. Retrieved 16 November 2019.