Kokcha River

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Kokcha River
River in Badakhshan province of Afghanistan.jpg
The Kokcha River in Badakhshan Province
Afghanistan physical map.svg
Red pog.svg
Mouth location of the Kokcha
Native nameرودخانه کوکچه  (Persian)
Location
Country Afghanistan
Provinces Badakhshan and Takhar
Physical characteristics
Mouth Amu Darya
  location
Dashti Qala District
  coordinates
37°09′47″N69°23′49″E / 37.163°N 69.397°E / 37.163; 69.397 Coordinates: 37°09′47″N69°23′49″E / 37.163°N 69.397°E / 37.163; 69.397
  elevation
446 m (1,463 ft)
Length320 km (200 mi) [1]
Basin size22,367.3 km2 (8,636.1 sq mi)
Discharge 
  average101–163 m3/s (3,600–5,800 cu ft/s) [2]
Basin features
Population715,236 [1]

The Kokcha River (Persian : رودخانه کوکچه) is located in northeastern Afghanistan. A tributary of the Panj river, it flows through Badakhshan Province in the Hindu Kush. The city of Feyzabad lies along the Kokcha. Near the village of Artin Jelow there is a bridge over the river. [3] [4] [5] [6]

Contents

Course

The Kokcha begins in Kuran wa Munjan District near the district center of Kuran wa Munjan and flows north, passing through Yamgan District and Jurm District. Near the village of Baharak, the Warduj river meets the Kokcha. The river then flows east, going around the northern border of Argo District and passing Feyzabad. Finally, the Kokcha enters Takhar Province, flows around the southern border of Rustaq District, and ends at the Amu Darya by Ai-Khanoum. [1] [2] [7]

See also

Related Research Articles

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References

  1. 1 2 3 "Watershed Atlas of Afghanistan: Part IV" (PDF). aizon.org. Retrieved 27 August 2020.
  2. 1 2 "DLM 3 Rivers of the Hindu Kush, Pamir, and Hindu Raj | Center for Afghanistan Studies | University of Nebraska Omaha". www.unomaha.edu. Retrieved 2020-08-27.
  3. Adamec, Ludwig W., ed. (1972), Historical and Political Gazetteer of Afghanistan, 1, Graz, Austria: Akadamische Druck-u. Verlangsanstalt, p. 25
  4. Moorey, Peter Roger (1999). Ancient mesopotamian materials and industries: the archaeological evidence. Eisenbrauns. pp. 86–87. ISBN   978-1-57506-042-2.
  5. Oldershaw, Cally (2003), "Lapis Lazuli", Firefly Guide to Gems, Toronto: Firefly Books.
  6. Bowersox, Gary W.; Chamberlin, Bonita E. (1995), Gemstones of Afghanistan, Tucson, AZ: Geoscience Press
  7. "Badakhshan Province - Reference Map". www.humanitarianresponse.info. 9 February 2014. Retrieved 27 August 2020.