Konrad Valentin von Kaim

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Konrad Valentin von Kaim
Birth nameJohann Konrad Valentin Ritter von Kaim
Born(1737-11-28)28 November 1737
Gengenbach, Germany
Died16 February 1801(1801-02-16) (aged 63)
Udine, Italy
Allegiance Royal Standard of the King of France.svg Kingdom of France,
Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy.svg Habsburg Monarchy
Service/branch Infantry
Years of service1770–1801
Rank Feldmarschallleutnant
Battles/wars French Revolutionary Wars
Awards Military Order of Maria Theresa (Knight's Cross)

Johann Konrad Valentin Ritter von Kaim (28 November 1737 (baptised) 16 February 1801) was a French soldier and Austrian infantry commander during the French Revolutionary Wars. He was mortally wounded at the Battle of Pozzolo on Christmas Day 1800, [1] but did not die until several weeks later. He was born in Gengenbach and died in Udine.

Footnotes

  1. Cust, Edward (1862). Annals of the wars of the 19th century, compiled from the most authentic histories of the period: I. Murray. p. 60.


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