Kristine Lilly

Last updated

Kristine Lilly
Lilly-2010-stl.jpg
Lilly in April 2010
Personal information
Full nameKristine Marie Lilly Heavey
Date of birth (1971-07-22) July 22, 1971 (age 48)
Place of birth New York City, New York, U.S.
Height 5 ft 4 in (1.63 m)
Playing position Forward/Midfielder
College career
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1989–1992 North Carolina Tar Heels
Senior career*
YearsTeamApps(Gls)
1994 Tyresö FF
1995 Washington Warthogs
(indoor)
6 (0)
1998 Delaware Genies 4 (5)
2001–2003 Boston Breakers 59 (14)
2005 KIF Örebro DFF 19 (8)
2009–2011 Boston Breakers 20 (3)
National team
1987–2010 United States 352 (130)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only

Kristine Marie Lilly Heavey (born July 22, 1971), née Kristine Marie Lilly, is a retired American soccer player who last played professionally for Boston Breakers in Women's Professional Soccer (WPS). She was a member of the United States women's national football team for 23 years and is the most capped football player in the history of the sport (men's or women's) gaining her 352nd and final cap [1] against Mexico in a World Cup qualifier in November 2010. Lilly scored 130 goals for the United States women's national team, behind Mia Hamm's 158 goals, and Abby Wambach's 184. [2]

Contents

Early life

Lilly attended Wilton High School in Wilton, Connecticut. While still attending high school, Lilly became a member of the United States women's national team. She was recruited by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

University of North Carolina

Lilly competed as a student-athlete, playing for the university's North Carolina Tar Heels women's soccer team from 1989 to 1992. During her time there, she won the NCAA Women's Soccer Championship every year she played. She won the Hermann Trophy as a junior in 1991. [3] To honor her time with the school, North Carolina retired her #15 jersey in 1994.

Playing career

Club

Lilly began her career with Tyresö FF of Sweden in 1994. She spent one season with the club before returning to the United States. On August 20, 1995, Lilly joined Washington Warthogs of the now-defunct Continental Indoor Soccer League. She was the only woman in the all-male professional indoor league, following in the footsteps of Collette Cunningham and Shannon Presley who had played in the league sparingly in 1994.

Lilly joined W-League side Delaware Genies in 1998. With the club, she appeared in four games, scoring five goals and two assists.

February 2001 saw the formation of the world's first women's professional soccer league in which all the players were paid. Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA) had its inaugural season in 2001. Lilly was the team captain and a founding member of Boston Breakers. In her first season with the team, she appeared in all twenty-one matches and played every minute of the season. She led the league in assists with eleven and added an additional three goals. For her performance, she was named First Team All-WUSA. In 2002, she started in a further nineteen games. She increased her point total for the season, scoring eight goals and assisting on thirteen others. She was again named First Team All-WUSA and was a starter on the WUSA North All-Star Team. In 2003 Lilly started all nineteen games in which she played, chipping in three goals and four assists and again being named to First Team All-WUSA, the only player in the history of the league to do so. Following the 2003 season, the WUSA ceased operations.

Following the termination of the league, Lilly followed former Boston Breakers head coach Pia Sundhage to Sweden to play for Damallsvenskan club KIF Örebro DFF in 2005. There she was joined by fellow USWNT teammate Christie Welsh as well as USWNT and Boston Breakers teammate, Kate Markgraf.

In late-2006 and early-2007, the formation of a new women's league took shape under the name of Women's Professional Soccer (WPS). On September 16, 2008, Lilly was allocated to Boston Breakers along with USWNT teammates Angela Hucles and Heather Mitts. The inaugural 2009 Women's Professional Soccer season saw Lilly appear in all twenty games (playing every minute) and score three goals with three assists.

International

Lilly (left) with Mia Hamm in St. Louis, 1998 Lilly356.jpg
Lilly (left) with Mia Hamm in St. Louis, 1998

Lilly made her debut for the United States women's national soccer team in 1987, when she was still attending high school. During her international career, she surpassed the previous women's world record of 151 caps, held by Norway's Heidi Støre, on May 21, 1998. [3] On January 30, 1999, she surpassed what was then the men's record of 164 caps, held by Adnan Al-Talyani of the United Arab Emirates.

Lilly has participated in the 1991, 1995, 1999, 2003, and 2007 editions of the FIFA Women's World Cup. She is a two-time World Cup champion, winning in 1991 and 1999; during extra time of the '99 Final against China, Lilly, standing on the goal line, blocked a Chinese shot which had passed goalkeeper Briana Scurry [4] - since the tournament took place with the golden goal rule in effect, the game would have been over if China had scored - and in the ensuing shootout, she scored the goal which would give the US the lead. When she played against North Korea on September 11, 2007, in the 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, she became the first woman (and only the third player overall) to participate in five different World Cup Finals; by scoring a goal against England on September 22, 2007, she became the oldest woman to score in the World Cup.

Lilly has also competed in the 1996, 2000, and 2004 editions of the Olympic Games. She won a gold medal in 1996 and 2004, and a silver medal in 2000. She missed the 2008 Summer Olympics due to the birth of her child.

Unlike several of her longtime teammates (among them Joy Fawcett, Julie Foudy, and Mia Hamm), she did not retire after the team's "farewell tour" which finished on December 8, 2004.

On January 18, 2006, Lilly made her 300th international appearance in a game against Norway. In the same match, she equaled Michelle Akers for second place on the team's all-time goal scoring list with 105. Lilly was named as a finalist for the 2006 FIFA Women's World Player of the Year. She finished second in the voting to Brazil's Marta.

After the birth of her daughter, Lilly returned to the national team in December 2008. Her last match for the national team, representing her record 352nd cap, was a World Cup qualifying loss to Mexico (1–2) on November 5, 2010, in which she played for six minutes as a substitute.

Matches and goals scored at World Cup and Olympic tournaments

Kristine Lilly competed in five FIFA Women's World Cup: China 1991, Sweden 1995, USA 1999, USA 2003 and China 2007; and three Olympics: Atlanta 1996, Sydney 2000, and Athens 2004; altogether played in 46 matches and scored 12 goals at those eight global tournaments. [5] With her USA teams, in eight world cup and olympic tournaments, Lilly had 39 wins, 3 losses, and 4 draws; finished first place with her teams 4 times, second place once and third place 3 times.

Key (expand for notes on “world cup and olympic goals”)
LocationGeographic location of the venue where the competition occurred
LineupStart – played entire match
on minute (off player) – substituted on at the minute indicated, and player was substituted off at the same time

off minute (on player) – substituted off at the minute indicated, and player was substituted on at the same time
( c ) – captain

MinThe minute in the match the goal was scored. For list that include caps, blank indicates played in the match but did not score a goal.
Assist/passThe ball was passed by the player, which assisted in scoring the goal. This column depends on the availability and source of this information.
penalty or pkGoal scored on penalty-kick which was awarded due to foul by opponent. (Goals scored in penalty-shoot-out, at the end of a tied match after extra-time, are not included.)
ScoreThe match score after the goal was scored.
ResultThe final score.

W – match was won
L – match was lost to opponent
D – match was drawn
(W) – penalty-shoot-out was won after a drawn match
(L) – penalty-shoot-out was lost after a drawn match

aetThe score at the end of extra-time; the match was tied at the end of 90' regulation
pso Penalty-shoot-out score shown in parenthesis; the match was tied at the end of extra-time
Orange background color – Olympic women's football tournament
Blue background color – FIFA women's world cup final tournament
GoalMatchDateLocationOpponentLineupMinScoreResultCompetition
China 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup
11991-11-17 [m 1] Panyu Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden

off 33' (on Hamilton)

3–2 W

Group stage
21991-11-19 [m 2] Panyu Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil

off 67' (on Belkin)

5–0 W

Group stage
31991-11-21 [m 3] Foshan Flag of Japan.svg  Japan

off 41' (on Akers)

3–0 W

Group stage
41991-11-24 [m 4] Foshan Flag of Chinese Taipei (FIFA).svg  Chinese Taipei Start

7–0 W

Quarter-final
51991-11-27 [m 5] Guangzhou Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Start

5–2 W

Semifinal
61991-11-30 [m 6] Guangzhou Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start

2–1 W

Final
Sweden 1995 FIFA Women's World Cup
71995-06-06 [m 7] Gävle Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Start

3–3 D

Group stage
181995-06-08 [m 8] Gävle Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Start91–0

2–0 W

Group stage
91995-06-10 [m 9] Helsingborg Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Start

4–1 W

Group stage
2101995-06-13 [m 10] Gävle Flag of Japan.svg  Japan

off 68' (on Bryan)

81–0

4–0 W

Quarter-final
3422–0
111995-06-15 [m 11] Västerås Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start

0–1 L

Semifinal
121995-06-17 [m 12] Gävle Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Start

2–0 W

Third place match
Atlanta 1996 Olympic Women's Football Tournament
131996-07-21 [m 13] Orlando Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Start

3–0 W

Group stage
141996-07-23 [m 14] Orlando Flag of North Korea.svg  Korea DPR Start

2–1 W

Group stage
151996-07-25 [m 15] Miami Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Start

0–0 D

Group stage
161996-07-28 [m 16] Athens Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start

2–1aet W

Semifinal
171996-08-01 [m 17] Athens Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Start

2–1 W

Gold medal match
USA 1999 FIFA Women's World Cup
4181999-06-19 [m 18] E Rutherford Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark Start893–0

3–0 W

Group stage
5191999-06-24 [m 19] Chicago Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Start324–1

7–1 W

Group stage
201999-06-27 [m 20] Boston Flag of North Korea.svg  Korea DPR Start

3–0 W

Group stage
211999-07-01 [m 21] Washington Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Start

3–2 W

Quarter-final
221999-07-04 [m 22] San Francisco Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start

2–0 W

Semifinal
231999-07-10 [m 23] Los Angeles Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Start

0–0(pso 5–4) (W)

Final
Sydney 2000 Olympic Women's Football Tournament
242000-09-14 [m 24] Melbourne Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start

2–0 W

Group stage
252000-09-17 [m 25] Melbourne Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China PR Start

1–1 D

Group stage
6262000-09-20 [m 26] Melbourne Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria

off 45' (on Serlenga)

352–0

3–1 W

Group stage
272000-09-24 [m 27] Canberra Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start

1–0 W

Semifinal
282000-09-28 [m 28] Sydney Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start

2–3aet L

Gold medal match
USA 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup
7292003-09-21 [m 29] Washington Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start271–0

3–1 W

Group stage
302003-09-25 [m 30] Philadelphia Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria Start

5–0 W

Group stage
312003-09-28 [m 31] Columbus Flag of North Korea.svg  Korea DPR

off 45' (on Foudy)

3–0 W

Group stage
322003-10-01 [m 32] Foxborough Flag of Norway.svg  Norway Start

1–0 W

Quarter-final
332003-10-05 [m 33] Portland Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Start

0–3 L

Semifinal
8342003-10-11 [m 34] Carson Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada Start221–0

3–1 W

Third place match
Athens 2004 Olympic Women's Football Tournament
352004-08-11 [m 35] Heraklion Flag of Greece.svg  Greece Start

3–0 W

Group stage
362004-08-14 [m 36] Thessaloniki Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil

off 69' (on O'Reilly)

2–0 W

Group stage
9372004-08-17 [m 37] Thessaloniki Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia Start191–0

1–1 D

Group stage
10382004-08-20 [m 38] Thessaloniki Flag of Japan.svg  Japan Start431–0

2–1 W

Quarter-final
11392004-08-23 [m 39] Heraklion Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Start331–0

2–1aet W

Semifinal
402004-08-26 [m 40] Piraeus Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start

2–1aet W

Gold medal match
China 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup
412007-09-11 [m 41] Chengdu Flag of North Korea.svg  Korea DPR Start; ( c )

2–2 D

Group stage
422007-09-14 [m 42] Chengdu Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Start; ( c )

2–0 W

Group stage
432007-09-18 [m 43] Shanghai Flag of Nigeria.svg  Nigeria

off 84' (on Tarpley); ( c )

1–0 W

Group stage
12442007-09-22 [m 44] Tianjin Flag of England.svg  England Start; ( c )603–0

3–0 W

Quarter-final
452007-09-27 [m 45] Hangzhou Flag of Brazil.svg  Brazil Start; ( c )

0–4 L

Semifinal
462007-09-30 [m 46] Shanghai Flag of Norway.svg  Norway

off 89' (on Kai); ( c )

4–1 W

Third place match

Coaching career

Lilly has been an assistant coach for the Boston Breakers since 2012. [6]

Personal life

Lilly grew up in Wilton, Connecticut, and lives in Needham, Massachusetts. [7] She is married to Brookline firefighter David Heavey, a former hockey and golf star at the University of Connecticut. Lilly gave birth to her first daughter Sidney Marie Heavey on her birthday, July 22, 2008, and her second daughter Jordan Mary Heavey on September 2, 2011.

She appeared in the HBO documentary Dare to Dream: The Story of the U.S. Women's Soccer Team . Lilly helps run a soccer camp with Mia Hamm and Tisha Venturini-Hoch. [8]

Career statistics

YearTeamLeagueGames
Played
GoalsAssistsPoints
1994 Tyresö FF Sweden
1995 Washington Warthogs CISL
1998 Delaware Genies W-League45212
2001 Boston Breakers WUSA2131016
2002Boston BreakersWUSA1981329
2003Boston BreakersWUSA193410
2005 KIF Örebro DFF Sweden
2009Boston BreakersWPS443
Total63192948

Honors and awards

YearTeamChampionship/Medal
1989University of North CarolinaNCAA National Champion
1990University of North CarolinaNCAA National Champion
1991USA WNTFIFA World Cup Champion
1991University of North CarolinaNCAA National Champion
1992University of North CarolinaNCAA National Champion
1995USA WNTFIFA World Cup Bronze
1996USA WNTOlympic Gold
1999USA WNTFIFA World Cup Champion
2000USA WNTOlympic Silver
2003USA WNTFIFA World Cup Bronze
2004USA WNTOlympic Gold
2007USA WNTFIFA World Cup Bronze
2015NoneInducted into the US Soccer Hall of Fame

See also

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References

  1. U.S. Soccer Media Guides https://web.archive.org/web/20140915022004/http://www.ussoccer.com/about/media-services/media-guide. Archived from the original on September 15, 2014. Retrieved August 12, 2016.Missing or empty |title= (help)[ failed verification ]
  2. Alexander, Valerie. "World Cup Football Stats Erase The Sport's Most Dominant Players: Women". Jezebel.com.
  3. 1 2 "Soccer profile:Kristine Lilly". Soccer Times. Retrieved June 22, 2009.
  4. kristinelilly (April 13, 2009). "Kristine Lilly Day - Hartford Tribute July, 18, 2007" via YouTube.
  5. "FIFA Player Statistics: Kristine LILLY". FIFA.
  6. "Coaching Staff". Boston Breakers. Retrieved December 20, 2012.
  7. "She scores goals. They fight fires. They share a bond". The Boston Globe. September 22, 2007.
  8. Wahl, Grant, "Seeing Stars", Sports Illustrated , July 4, 2011, p. 101.
Match reports
  1. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 1991: MATCH Report: Sweden- USA". FIFA.
  2. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 1991: MATCH Report: Brazil – USA". FIFA.
  3. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 1991: MATCH Report: Japan – USA". FIFA.
  4. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 1991: MATCH Report: USA – Chinese Taipai". FIFA.
  5. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 1991: MATCH Report: Germany – USA". FIFA.
  6. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 1991: MATCH Report: Norway – USA". FIFA.
  7. "FIFA Women's World Cup: Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: USA – China PR". FIFA.
  8. "FIFA Women's World Cup: Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: USA – Denmark". FIFA.
  9. "FIFA Women's World Cup: Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: USA – AUS". FIFA.
  10. "FIFA Women's World Cup: Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: Japan – USA". FIFA.
  11. "FIFA Women's World Cup: Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: USA – Norway". FIFA.
  12. "FIFA Women's World Cup: Sweden 1995: MATCH Report: China PR – USA". FIFA.
  13. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Atlanta 1996: MATCH Report: USA – Nigeria". FIFA.
  14. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Atlanta 1996: MATCH Report: USA – Korea PR". FIFA.
  15. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Atlanta 1996: MATCH Report: USA – Germany". FIFA.
  16. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Atlanta 1996: MATCH Report: USA – Brazil". FIFA.
  17. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Atlanta 1996: MATCH Report: USA – China PR". FIFA.
  18. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 1999: MATCH Report: USA – Denmark". FIFA.
  19. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 1999: MATCH Report: USA – Nigeria". FIFA.
  20. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 1999: MATCH Report: USA – Korea PR". FIFA.
  21. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 1999: MATCH Report: USA – Germany". FIFA.
  22. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 1999: MATCH Report: USA – Brazil". FIFA.
  23. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 1999: MATCH Report: USA – China PR". FIFA.
  24. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: USA – Norway". FIFA.
  25. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: USA – China PR". FIFA.
  26. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: Nigeria – USA". FIFA.
  27. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: USA – Brazil". FIFA.
  28. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Sydney 2000: MATCH Report: USA – Norway". FIFA.
  29. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 2003: MATCH Report: USA – Sweden". FIFA.
  30. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 2003: MATCH Report: USA – Nigeria". FIFA.
  31. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 2003: MATCH Report: Korea PR – USA". FIFA.
  32. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 2003: MATCH Report: USA – Norway". FIFA.
  33. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 2003: MATCH Report: USA – Germany". FIFA.
  34. "FIFA Women's World Cup: USA 2003: MATCH Report: USA – CAN". FIFA.
  35. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Athens 2004: MATCH Report: Greece – USA". FIFA.
  36. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Athens 2004: MATCH Report: USA – Brazil". FIFA.
  37. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Athens 2004: MATCH Report: USA – Australia". FIFA.
  38. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Athens 2004: MATCH Report: USA – Japan". FIFA.
  39. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Athens 2004: MATCH Report: USA – Germany". FIFA.
  40. "Women's Olympic Football Tournament: Athens 2004: MATCH Report: USA – Brazil". FIFA.
  41. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 2007: MATCH Report: USA – Korea PR". FIFA.
  42. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 2007: MATCH Report: Sweden- USA". FIFA.
  43. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 2007: MATCH Report: Nigeria – USA". FIFA.
  44. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 2007: MATCH Report: USA – ENG". FIFA.
  45. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 2007: MATCH Report: USA – Brazil". FIFA.
  46. "FIFA Women's World Cup: China PR 2007: MATCH Report: Norway – USA". FIFA.

Further reading

Preceded by
Julie Foudy
WNT captain
2004–2008
Succeeded by
Christie Rampone