Kulin, Western Australia

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Kulin
Western Australia
Kulin Memorial Hall, 2014(1).JPG
Kulin Memorial Hall, 2014
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Kulin
Coordinates 32°40′S118°09′E / 32.67°S 118.15°E / -32.67; 118.15 Coordinates: 32°40′S118°09′E / 32.67°S 118.15°E / -32.67; 118.15
Population369 (2016 census) [1]
Established1900s
Postcode(s) 6365
Location
LGA(s) Shire of Kulin
State electorate(s) Central Wheatbelt
Federal Division(s) O'Connor

Kulin is a town in the eastern Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, approximately 280 km from Perth. It is the main town in the Shire of Kulin.

Contents

History

The first European known to have visited the Kulin area was Captain John Septimus Roe, Surveyor General of the Swan River Colony on his 1848-49 expedition to examine the south coast. He encountered a group of Aboriginal people 34 miles east of Nalyaring (near Brookton) who guided the expedition party to several water sources, including the Kulin Rock soak, before leaving the party at Yeerakine Rock (just south and east of Kondinin) as this was the limit of their territory. These guides used the name "Coolin" to describe the area now known as Kulin Rock.

In the early years, settlers occasionally encountered groups of Aborigines hunting possums. Although artifacts such as grinding stones and stone choppers have been found in the district, no signs of permanent occupation were found by early settlers other than the mia-mias built by "Europeanised" Aboriginal shepherds from Narrogin in the employ of Michael Brown.

Brown, a businessman from Narrogin, took up large pastoral leases in the Kulin/Kondinin area including Kulin Rock and Gnarming in 1905. These and other leases in the area were terminated in 1909/1910 to allow the government to distribute the land for agricultural purposes.

The first land selected for farming in the Kulin area was at Wogolin and Dudinin in January 1909 – extending from the more established areas of Narrogin and Wickepin. Settlement did not proceed evenly from this direction however as early farmers selected areas with better soils or reliable water sources. This was the case at Kulin Rock with Edward John (Dick) Reardon and Michael Healy arriving there in February 1909 to take up farming land. Much of this activity took place before the official survey at the end of 1909 including James Fitt (previously an overseer for Brown) taking up land adjoining Jilakin Rock and at Jitarning.

Jilakin had been the original name of the location in 1913; in 1915 it was changed to Kulin. [2]

In 1932 the Wheat Pool of Western Australia announced that the town would have two grain elevators, each fitted with an engine, installed at the railway siding. [3]

Present day

Kulin has a population of about 350 and is an agricultural centre for a district whose main activities are wheat and sheep farming. Wildflower viewing is possible during September and October. The town contains a district high school, a Bendigo Bank, shopping facilities, accommodation (hotel, motel, caravan park), council offices and a telecentre. Every year in October, it hosts the Kulin Bush Races.

Kulin has its own police station, which covers the shire and surrounding areas. It has two permanent police officers who live in the township and conduct highway patrols and provide support to nearby stations.

The town is a stop on the Transwa bus service to Esperance. [4]

The surrounding areas produce wheat and other cereal crops. The town is a receival site for Cooperative Bulk Handling. [5]

Tin horses

Tin horse near Kulin Kulin tinhorse.jpg
Tin horse near Kulin

The roads leading into and through Kulin have a collection of over 100 tin horses. The largest is 10 m long and stands 5 m high. All the horses are made primarily from lubricant tins and drums. They are from entries into the annual competition [6] as part of the local race day.

Kulin Bush Races

The Kulin Bush Races is an annual event involving horse races, betting, alcohol and fireworks. It is held on one day, but campers can sleep the night the day before and after the event. All money made from the event is put back into the community.

Water slide

The water slide at the Kulin Aquatic Centre is the largest in regional Western Australia; it is 18 metres (59 ft) high and 182 metres (597 ft) long. [7] It was opened in 2001. [8]

The slide was funded by a local farmer to improve local sport and recreation. It was bought from Tanawha, Queensland, disassembled and trucked to Kulin by local volunteers, then reassembled. [8]

Blazing Swan

Blazing Swan is an annual regional Burning Man event held in Kulin. It is a 7-day event which is an experiment in temporary community and artistic expression, and is guided by the ten principles of Burning Man, plus an eleventh - consent. The event occurs around Easter each year, with the 2017 event scheduled for April 12–18. The event location is in dry bushland near Jilakin Lake, and is referred to as Jilakin Rock City. Each year a swan-shaped wooden effigy is built and burned at the culmination of the event.

Related Research Articles

Wheatbelt (Western Australia)

The Wheatbelt is one of nine regions of Western Australia defined as administrative areas for the state's regional development, and a vernacular term for the area converted to agriculture during colonisation. It partially surrounds the Perth metropolitan area, extending north from Perth to the Mid West region, and east to the Goldfields-Esperance region. It is bordered to the south by the South West and Great Southern regions, and to the west by the Indian Ocean, the Perth metropolitan area, and the Peel region. Altogether, it has an area of 154,862 square kilometres (59,793 sq mi).

Wagin, Western Australia Town in the Great Southern region of Western Australia

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Narrogin, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

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Dalwallinu, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

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Merredin, Western Australia Town in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia

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Corrigin, Western Australia Town in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia

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Hyden, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

The town of Hyden is located 292 kilometres (181 mi) east-southeast of Perth, Western Australia in the Shire of Kondinin. Hyden is home to Wave Rock, Mulka's Cave and Hippos Yawn, all popular local tourist attractions.

Darkan, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

Darkan is a town in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, between Collie and the Albany Highway on the Coalfields Highway. It is also the seat of the Shire of West Arthur. At the 2016 census, Darkan had a population of 403.

Williams, Western Australia Town in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia

Williams is a town located in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, 161 kilometres (100 mi) south-southeast of the state capital, Perth along Albany Highway and 32 kilometres (20 mi) west of Narrogin. The Williams River passes through the town. At the 2006 census, Williams had a population of 338.

Bruce Rock, Western Australia Town in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia

Bruce Rock is a town in the eastern Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, approximately 243 kilometres (151 mi) east of Perth and 48 kilometres (30 mi) southwest of Merredin. It is the main town in the Shire of Bruce Rock.

Yornaning, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

Yornaning is a small town located in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, on Great Southern Highway, between Pingelly and Narrogin.

Harrismith, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

Harrismith is a small town in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, approximately 260 kilometres (162 mi) south-east of Perth between the towns of Wickepin and Kulin.

Tincurrin is a small town in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, 250 kilometres (155 mi) south-east of Perth and within the Shire of Wickepin.

Pingelly, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

Pingelly is a town and shire located in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, 158 kilometres (98 mi) from Perth via the Brookton Highway and Great Southern Highway. The town is also located on the Great Southern railway line.

Shire of Kulin Local government area in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia

The Shire of Kulin is a local government area in the eastern Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, about 300 kilometres (186 mi) ESE of the state capital, Perth. The Shire's land area of 4,714 square kilometres (1,820 sq mi) forms a narrow east-west band, located between the Shire of Kondinin to the north and the Shire of Lake Grace to the south. Its seat of government is the town of Kulin. The local economy is based on agriculture - predominantly cereal grains and sheep.

Shire of Kondinin Local government area in Western Australia

The Shire of Kondinin is a local government area in the eastern Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, about 300 kilometres (186 mi) east of the state capital, Perth. The Shire's land area of 7,376 square kilometres (2,848 sq mi) forms a narrow east-west band, located between the Shire of Narembeen to the north and the Shire of Kulin to the south. Its seat of government is the town of Kondinin.

Kondinin, Western Australia Town in Western Australia

Kondinin is a town located in the eastern Wheatbelt region of Western Australia, 279 kilometres (173 mi) east of the state capital, Perth via the Brookton Highway and State Route 40 between Corrigin and Hyden. It is one of three towns in the Shire of Kondinin. At the 2006 census, Kondinin had a population of 311.

Major roads in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia

Highways and main roads in the Wheatbelt region of Western Australia form the basis of a road network, which is primarily used by the mining, agriculture, and tourism industries. Main Roads Western Australia maintains and controls these major roads, with offices based in Northam and Narrogin.

Jilakin Rock

Jilakin Rock is a granite rock formation located approximately 15 km (9.3 mi) east of Kulin and approximately 25 km (16 mi) south of Kondinin in the central Wheatbelt region of Western Australia. It overlooks Jilakin Lake and is a prominent feature in the area, rising out of the surrounding flat plains.

Yeerakine Rock is a granite rock formation located approximately 12 km (7.5 mi) south of Kondinin and approximately 20 km (12 mi) north west of Kulin in the central Wheatbelt region of Western Australia.

References

  1. Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Kulin (L) (Urban Centre/Locality)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 29 August 2008. OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg
  2. Jarvis, Neil (1986) Western Australia, an atlas of human endeavour Perth, W.A.: Dept. of Lands and Surveys in association with the Education Dept. of Western Australia 2nd ed. ISBN   0-7309-0082-7 Previous ed.: Perth, W.A.: Government Printer, 1979. p. 46
  3. "Country elevators". The West Australian . Perth: National Library of Australia. 6 July 1932. p. 10. Retrieved 6 April 2013.
  4. GE2 timetable, TransWA, effective 26 November 2017. Accessed 13 June 2018.
  5. "CBH receival sites" (PDF). 2011. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 March 2012. Retrieved 1 April 2013.
  6. https://kulin.wa.gov.au/main/tourism/tin-horse-highway/tin-horse-competition-/
  7. "Aquatic Centre and Water Slide". Shire of Kulin. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  8. 1 2 Kit Mochan (2 December 2018). "How the WA town of Kulin reinvented itself and brought the tourists flooding in". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 2 December 2018.

Further reading

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