Kumchon County

Last updated
Kŭmch'ŏn County

금천군
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja金川郡
  McCune-ReischauerKŭmch'ŏn-gun
  Revised RomanizationGeumcheon-gun
DPRK2006 Hwangbuk-Kumchon.PNG
Map of North Hwanghae showing the location of Kumchon
Country North Korea
Province North Hwanghae Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 14 ri
Population
 (2008)
  Total68,216

Kŭmch'ŏn County is a county in the North Hwanghae province of North Korea. It has a population of 68,216. [1]

Contents

Geography

Kŭmch'ŏn is bordered to the west by Kaesŏng, to the south by Kaep'ung, to the northwest by T'osan, and to the north by Mt. Pakbong (562 m) and Sin'gye county. It is bordered to the east by the Ryesŏng River, P'yŏngsan, and Pongch'ŏn county (in South Hwanghae). According to preliminary results from the 2008 population census, it has a population of 3,255,388. [1]

Climate

Kŭmch'ŏn had a fairly severe climate, with an average temperature of 10.2 degrees. Inland, the average January temperature is -7 degrees, while the average August temperature is 25.6 degrees. The county receives an average of 1,100 mm of rain per year.

Transportation

The county is served by the P'yongbu line of the Korean State Railway, which stops in at Kŭmch'ŏn station. There is also a highway which runs through Kŭmch'ŏn-ŭp.

Industry

Agriculture is the main industry of Kŭmch'ŏn. Mainly rice but also several other products like beans, wheat, ginseng and tobacco are cultivated. Kŭmch'ŏn, like many other parts of northern Korea, is a resource-rich region. Some resources are for example asbestos, molybdenum, mercury, cinnabar, serpentine etc.

Administrative divisions

The county is divided into one town (ŭp) and 14 villages (ri). [2]

Chosŏn'gŭl Hancha
Kŭmch'ŏn-ŭp금천읍
Hyŏnnae-ri현내리
Kangbuk-ri강북리
Kangnam-ri강남리
Kyejŏng-ri계정리
Munmyŏng-ri문명리
Namjŏng-ri남정리
Paengma-ri백마리 白馬里
Paek'yang-ri백양리 白陽里
Ryanghap-ri량합리
Ryongsŏng-ri룡성리
Singang-ri신강리
Tŏksal-li덕산리
Wŏlam-ri월암리
Wŏnmyŏng-ri원명리

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "United Nations Statistics Division; Preliminary results of the 2008 Census of Population of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea conducted on 1–15 October 2008" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 March 2009. Retrieved 2018-08-21.
  2. "중앙일보 - 아시아 첫 인터넷 신문". Archived from the original on 2011-07-13. Retrieved 2009-12-10.

Coordinates: 38°09′40″N126°28′34″E / 38.16111°N 126.47611°E / 38.16111; 126.47611