Kumgang County

Last updated
Kŭmgang County
금강군
County
Korean transcription(s)
   Chosŏn'gŭl
   Hancha
   McCune-Reischauer Kŭmgang-gun
   Revised Romanization Geumgang-gun
Map of Geumgang-Gun.png
Country North Korea
Province Kangwŏn Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 26 ri
Area
  Total 1,009 km2 (390 sq mi)
Population (1991 est.)
  Total 100,000

Kŭmgang County is a kun, or county, in Kangwŏn province, North Korea. Kŭmgang lies immediately north of the Korean Demilitarized Zone. It was formed in 1952 from a portion of Hoeyang County and from those sections of Yanggu, and Rinje counties that remained under Northern control after the armistice. The county takes its name from the Mount Kŭmgang, which is partially located there. The county seat, Kŭmgang-ŭp, was formerly called Malhwi-ri.

Administrative divisions of North Korea

The administrative divisions of North Korea are organized into three hierarchical levels. These divisions were discovered in 2002. Many of the units have equivalents in the system of South Korea. At the highest level are nine provinces, two directly governed cities, and three special administrative divisions. The second-level divisions are cities, counties, wards, and districts. These are further subdivided into third-level entities: towns, neighborhoods, villages, and workers' districts.

Kangwon Province (North Korea) Province in North Korea

Kangwon Province is a province of North Korea, with its capital at Wŏnsan. Before the division of Korea in 1945, Kangwŏn Province and its South Korean neighbour Gangwon Province formed a single province that excluded Wŏnsan.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Contents

Geography

The Taebaek Mountains pass through the county, reaching their highest point in the Pirobong peak of Kumgangsan. Approximately 85% of the county's area is forestland. Major local streams include the Kŭmgangch'ŏn and Tonggŭmgangch'ŏn.

Taebaek Mountains mountain range on the Korean peninsula

The Taebaek Mountains are a mountain range that stretches across North Korea and South Korea. They form the main ridge of the Korean peninsula.

Administrative divisions

Kŭmgang county is divided into 1 ŭp (town) and 26 ri (villages):

  • Kŭmgang-ŭp (formerly Malhwi)
  • Anmi-ri
  • Ch'ŏngdu-ri
  • Hahwi-ri
  • Hwach'ŏl-li
  • Hyŏl-li
  • Hyŏndong-ri
  • Ip'o-ri
  • Kŭmch'ŏl-li
  • Kŭmp'ung-ri
  • Mundŭng-ri
  • Naegang-ri
  • Och'ŏl-li
  • Paekhyŏl-li
  • Pangmong-ri
  • Pukchŏm-ri
  • P'ungmi-ri
  • Ryongam-ri
  • Sedong-ri
  • Sin'gyo-ri
  • Sin'ŭp-ri
  • Sinwŏl-li
  • Sogol-li
  • Soksa-ri
  • Songgŏ-ri
  • Sunggap-ri
  • Tanp'ung-ri

Economy

The chief local industry is agriculture, with rice and maize the dominant crops. However, arable land takes up only 8.5% of the county's area. Manufacturing and livestock raising also contribute to the local economy. Mining is supported by deposits of gold, tungsten, and quartz.

See also

Geography of North Korea

North Korea is located in East Asia on the Northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

Korean language Language spoken in Korea

The Korean language is an East Asian language spoken by about 77 million people. It is a member of the Koreanic language family and is the official and national language of both Koreas: North Korea and South Korea, with different standardized official forms used in each country. It is also one of the two official languages in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County of Jilin province, China. It is also spoken in parts of Sakhalin, Ukraine and Central Asia.

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