Kuramae Kokugikan

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Kuramae Kokugikan
Kuramae Kokugikan main entrance.jpg
Kuramae Kokugikan
Location Taitō, Tokyo, Japan
Coordinates 35°42′08″N139°47′30″E / 35.702333°N 139.791556°E / 35.702333; 139.791556 Coordinates: 35°42′08″N139°47′30″E / 35.702333°N 139.791556°E / 35.702333; 139.791556
Opened1950
Closed1984
Tenants
Japan Sumo Association

Kuramae Kokugikan (蔵前国技館, Kuramae Kokugi-kan) was a building situated in the Kuramae neighborhood of Taitō, Tokyo which was built by the Japan Sumo Association and opened in 1950. The Association needed a permanent venue to hold sumo tournaments as the previous, bomb-damaged, Kokugikan had been taken over by occupying Allied forces after World War II. Since then tournaments had been held in various venues, including the Meiji Shrine and baseball stadiums. [1] Tournaments were held there until September 1984, and in January 1985 the new Ryōgoku Kokugikan was opened. [2] It was also hired out for other sporting events such as professional wrestling. The building was torn down and is now the site of the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Bureau of Sewage. [3]

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References

  1. Sharnoff, Lora (1993). Grand Sumo. Weatherhill. p. 49. ISBN   0-8348-0283-X.
  2. Japan, An Illustrated Encyclopedia (Hardcover). Tokyo, Japan: Kodansha. 1993. pp.  817. ISBN   4-06-205938-X.
  3. Gunning, John (10 September 2019). "Sumo 101: Kuramae Kokugikan". Japan Times. Retrieved 17 October 2019.CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)