Kurashiki

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Kurashiki

倉敷市
Kurashiki bikatiku naka-bashi.JPG
Bikan district of Kurashiki
Flag of Kurashiki, Okayama.svg
Flag
Kurashiki Okayama chapter.JPG
Chapter
Kurashiki in Okayama Prefecture Ja.svg
Location of Kurashiki in Okayama Prefecture
Japan location map with side map of the Ryukyu Islands.svg
Red pog.svg
Kurashiki
Location in Japan
Coordinates: 34°35′N133°46′E / 34.583°N 133.767°E / 34.583; 133.767 Coordinates: 34°35′N133°46′E / 34.583°N 133.767°E / 34.583; 133.767
CountryJapan
Region Chūgoku (San'yō)
Prefecture Okayama Prefecture
Government
  MayorKaori Itō
Area
  Total355.63 km2 (137.31 sq mi)
Population
 (March 31, 2017)
  Total483,576
  Density1,400/km2 (3,500/sq mi)
Time zone UTC+09:00 (JST)
City hall address640 Nishinakashinden, Kurashiki-shi, Okayama-ken
710-8565
Website www.city.kurashiki.okayama.jp
Symbols
Bird Kingfisher
Flower Wysteria
Tree Camphor

Kurashiki (倉敷市, Kurashiki-shi) is a historic city located in western Okayama Prefecture, Japan, sitting on the Takahashi River, on the coast of the Inland Sea. As of March 31, 2017, the city has an estimated population of 483,576 and a population density of 1,400 persons per km². The total area is 355.63 km². [1]

Contents

History

The modern city of Kurashiki was founded on April 1, 1928. Previously, it was the site of clashes between the Taira and Minamoto clans during the Heian period. It gradually developed as a river port. During the Edo period, it became an area directly controlled by the shogunate. Distinctive white-walled, black-tiled warehouses were built to store goods. During the Meiji Restoration (Japan's Industrial Revolution period), factories were built, including the Ohara Spinning Mill, which still stands as the nostalgic tourist attraction Ivy Square. [2]

On August 1, 2005, the town of Mabi (from Kibi District), and the town of Funao (from Asakuchi District) were merged with Kurashiki.

Attractions

19th-century warehouses in the Bikan district of Kurashiki Japan Kurashiki quay 3 034.jpg
19th-century warehouses in the Bikan district of Kurashiki
Great Seto Bridge (Seto-Ohashi Bridge) seen from Shimotsui, Kurashiki Shimotsui-Seto Bridge who saw from Okayama Prefecture.JPG
Great Seto Bridge (Seto-Ohashi Bridge) seen from Shimotsui, Kurashiki
Kurashiki Canal Area Kurashiki Canal Area.jpg
Kurashiki Canal Area

Kurashiki is the home of Japan's first museum for Western art, the Ohara Museum of Art. Established in 1930 by Magosaburō Ōhara, it contains paintings by El Greco, Monet, Matisse, Gauguin, and Renoir. The collection also presents fine examples of Asian and contemporary art. The main building is designed in the style of Neoclassicism.

The old merchant quarter is called the Bikan historical area. It contains many fine examples of 17th century wooden warehouses (kura, 倉) painted white with traditional black tiles, along a canal framed with weeping willows and filled with koi . The area has no electric poles in order to make it more closely resemble the look of the Meiji period. One of the city's former town halls was located in the Kurashiki Kan, a European style building constructed in 1917.

In 1997 a theme park called Tivoli (after the park of the same name in Copenhagen) opened near Kurashiki Station. After ten years of operation it was closed in 2008, with a massive debt.

The Great Seto Bridge connects the city to Sakaide in Kagawa Prefecture across the Inland Sea.

Kenzo Tange, winner of the 1987 Pritzker Prize for architecture, designed the former Kurashiki City Hall in 1960.

Education

Colleges and universities

The city is home to several private universities and one public university.

Primary and secondary schools

The city has a North Korean school, Okayama Korean Elementary and Junior High School ( 岡山朝鮮初中級学校 ). [3]

Sports

Kurashiki has a variety of Sports clubs, including former Japan Football League side Mitsubishi Mizushima.

Kurashiki was also the place where current J. League sides Vissel Kobe and Fagiano Okayama had their origins before moving.

Sister and friendship cities

Kurashiki maintains the following sister and friendship cities: [4]

Notable people

Related Research Articles

Okayama Prefecture Prefecture of Japan

Okayama Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Chūgoku region of Honshu. Okayama Prefecture has a population of 1,906,464 and has a geographic area of 7,114 km2. Okayama Prefecture borders Tottori Prefecture to the north, Hyōgo Prefecture to the east, and Hiroshima Prefecture to the west.

JFE Steel

JFE Steel is the second largest Japanese steel manufacturer. The company was created in 2002 through the merger of the steel manufacturing business of Kawasaki Steel and NKK. It is owned by JFE Holdings, which is listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange.

Takahashi River

The Takahashi River is a Class A major river in the western part of Okayama Prefecture. It acts as the main drainage for the Takahashi River Drainage System, and is one of the three main drainage rivers in Okayama Prefecture.

Kurashiki Station Railway station in Kurashiki, Okayama Prefecture, Japan

Kurashiki Station is a JR West Sanyō Main Line and Hakubi Line railway station located in 1-1 1-chōme, Achi, Kurashiki, Okayama Prefecture, Japan. All Sanyō Main Line and Hakubi Line express and limited express trains stop at this station. The Mizushima Coastal Railway Kurashiki-shi Station is near the station.

Naoko Hayashiba, who is also known by the pen name Masaru Katori, is a Japanese writer and manga author from Fukuoka. She had a successful career as professional shogi player but quit during a sex scandal with another professional player, Makoto Nakahara, in 1995. Since then, she has focused on writing and TV work. She has written two novel series, Tondemo Police and Kiss Dakeja Iya, and the manga Shion no Ō. In 2010, after a 15-year absence, she returned to shogi.

Kibi International University Charme Okayama Takahashi (吉備国際大学Charme岡山高梁) is a women's football club playing in Japan's football league, Challenge League. Its hometown is the city of Takahashi.

Yasuharu Ōyama

Yasuharu Ōyama was a professional shogi player, 15th Lifetime Meijin and president of Japan Shogi Association. He studied shogi under Kinjiro Kimi. He won 80 titles, 44 other type tournaments and 1433 games in life, and was awarded five lifetime titles: Lifetime Meijin, Lifetime Jūdan, Lifetime Ōi, Lifetime Kisei and Lifetime Ōshō. Among his 80 titles, 18 were the Meijin title. He has appeared in the Meijin title match 25 times winning 18; he also holds the record for the most consecutive Meijin titles, the most overall Meijin titles, and being the oldest player to challenge for the Meijin title, at age 63 in 1986.

Mirai Aoshima is a Japanese professional shogi player ranked 6-dan, and a chess player holding the title of FIDE Master.

Kana Satomi

Kana Satomi is a Japanese women's professional shogi player ranked 6-dan. She is the current holder of the Women's Meijin and Ōi titles as well as the Kurashiki Tōka Cup and Seirei titles, thus making her a 4-crown title holder. She is also the career leader in women's professional shogi major titles.

Yasuhiro Masuda is a Japanese professional shogi player, ranked 6-dan.

Yūki Sasaki is a Japanese professional shogi player, ranked 7-dan.

Daichi Sasaki

Daichi Sasaki is a Japanese professional shogi player ranked 5-dan.

Kōru Abe is a Japanese professional shogi player ranked 6-dan.

Reo Kurosawa is a Japanese professional shogi player ranked 6-dan.

Kōzō Arimori is a Japanese professional shogi player ranked 7-dan.

Kurashiki-shi Station Railway station in Kurashiki, Okayama Prefecture, Japan

Kurashiki-shi Station is a train station in the city of Kurashiki, Okayama Prefecture, Japan. It is on the Mizushima Main Line, operated by Mizushima Rinkai Railway. This is the only staffed station on the line. The station is located close to Kurashiki Station on the Sanyō Main Line and Hakubi Line, operated by JR West. Currently, all services stop at this station.

Ryōko Chiba is a Japanese women's professional shogi player ranked 4-dan. She is a two-time winner of the Women's Ōshō title.

Yuria Katō Japanese Shogi player

Yuria Katō is a Japanese women's professional shogi player ranked 1-dan.

Takayuki Kuroda is a Japanese professional shogi player ranked 5-dan.

Takumi Itō is a Japanese professional shogi player ranked 4-dan.

References

  1. "Official website of Kurashiki city" (in Japanese). Japan: Kurashiki City. Retrieved 12 April 2017.
  2. "Kurashiki's History". City of Kurashiki. August 7, 2006. Archived from the original on January 19, 2007. Retrieved August 8, 2006.
  3. "Archived copy" ウリハッキョ一覧. Archived from the original on October 14, 2015. Retrieved October 14, 2015.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)" ().
  4. Kurashiki's Sister/Friendship Cities [ permanent dead link ]
  5. Silvey, Jennifer (July 28, 2019). "Learn more about Kansas City's sister cities and possible travel destinations". Fox 4 KC. Retrieved January 19, 2021.
  6. "Japanese Tea Room and Garden". Kansas City Parks. Retrieved October 18, 2017.
  7. 星野仙一記念館 [Hoshino Senichi Memorial Hall] (in Japanese). Kurashiki Convention & Visitors Bureau. Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  8. 大原孫三郎から現代まで [From Magosaburo Ohara to the present] (in Japanese). Ohara Museum. Retrieved 2 October 2014.
  9. 7 大山名人記念館(倉敷市芸文館内 (in Japanese). Kurashiki City. Retrieved 30 September 2014.
  10. 棋士紹介:物故棋士一覧 (in Japanese). Japan Shogi Association. Archived from the original on 23 September 2014. Retrieved 30 September 2014.
  11. "Daisuke TAKAHASHI Biography". International Skating Union. Retrieved February 20, 2018.
  12. "Biography". International Skating Union. Retrieved February 20, 2018.