Kuzma (constructor)

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A Kuzma-Offenhauser driven by Jimmy Bryan, which won the 1957 Race of Two Worlds. Bryan Dean Van Lines Monza.jpg
A Kuzma-Offenhauser driven by Jimmy Bryan, which won the 1957 Race of Two Worlds.

Kuzma was a racing car constructor founded by Eddie Kuzma in the United States. Kuzma cars competed in the FIA World Championship (Indy 500 only) from 1951 to 1960. They won the 1952 Indianapolis 500 with Troy Ruttman. [1]

Indianapolis 500 Auto race held in Speedway, Indiana, United States

The Indianapolis 500-Mile Race is an automobile race held annually at Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS) in Speedway, Indiana, United States, an enclave suburb of Indianapolis, Indiana. The event is held over Memorial Day weekend in late May. It is contested as part of the IndyCar Series, the top level of American Championship Car racing, an open-wheel open-cockpit formula colloquially known as "Indy Car Racing". The name of the race is often shortened to Indy 500, and the track itself is nicknamed "the Brickyard", as the racing surfacing was paved in brick in the fall of 1909.

1952 Indianapolis 500 36th running of the Indianapolis 500 motor race

The 36th International 500-Mile Sweepstakes was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway on Friday, May 30, 1952. The event was part of the 1952 AAA National Championship Trail and was also race 2 of 8 in the 1952 World Championship of Drivers.

Troy Ruttman was an American race car driver. He was the older brother of NASCAR driver Joe Ruttman, Jerry Ruttman & Jimmie Ruttman

Kuzma-Offy sprint car driven by Parnelli Jones. Kuzma-Offy sprint car.jpg
Kuzma-Offy sprint car driven by Parnelli Jones.

World Championship Indy 500 results

Note: all cars were fitted with Offenhauser engines.

Offenhauser company

The Offenhauser Racing Engine, or Offy, is a racing engine design that dominated American open wheel racing for more than 50 years and is still popular among vintage sprint and midget car racers.

SeasonDriverGridClassificationPointsNoteRace Report
1951 Walt Faulkner 14Ret Engine Report
1952 Troy Ruttman 718  Report
1953 Tony Bettenhausen 69 Accident Report
Manny Ayulo 413 Engine
Bob Sweikert 29Ret Suspension
Pat Flaherty 24Ret Accident
Chuck Stevenson 16Ret Fuel Leak
1954 Jimmy Bryan 326  Report
Chuck Stevenson 512  
Manny Ayulo 2213  
1955 Johnny Thomson 3343  Report
Duane Carter 1811  
Jimmy Bryan 11Ret Fuel Pump
Rodger Ward 30Ret Accident
1956 Bob Sweikert 106   Report
Gene Hartley 2211  
Eddie Johnson 3215  
Billy Garrett 2916  
Jimmy Bryan 1919  
Johnny Thomson 18Ret Spun Off
1957 Jimmy Bryan 1534  Report
Johnny Thomson 1112  
Chuck Weyant 2514  
Eddie Sachs 2Ret Fuel Leak
1958 Johnnie Tolan 3013   Report
Dempsey Wilson 32Ret Fire
A. J. Foyt 12Ret Spun Off
Eddie Sachs 18Ret Transmission
Art Bisch 28Ret Accident
1959 A. J. Foyt 1710   Report
Gene Hartley 911  
Eddie Sachs 2Ret Spun Off
Al Keller 28Ret Engine
Bill Cheesbourg 30Ret Magneto
1960 Duane Carter 2712   Report
Bill Homeier 3113  

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References

  1. "Driver Troy Ruttman 1952 Formula One Results". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 15 August 2018.