Kyonghung County

Last updated
Kyonghung County
경흥군
County
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja慶興郡
  McCune-ReischauerKyŏnghŭng-gun
  Revised RomanizationGyeongheung-gun
DPRK2006 Hambuk-Undok.PNG
Map of North Hamgyong showing the location of Kyonghung
Country North Korea
Province North Hamgyong Province
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp;, 3 workers' districts, 12 ri
Area
  Total920 km2 (360 sq mi)
Population (1991 est.)
  Total100,000

Kyŏnghŭng County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyong province, North Korea. Formerly known as Ŭndŏk County (Chosŏn'gŭl : 은덕군; Hancha : 恩德郡), from 1977 to 2010.

North Korea Sovereign state in East Asia

North Korea, officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, is a country in East Asia constituting the northern part of the Korean Peninsula, with Pyongyang the capital and the largest city in the country. The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia, under Gwanggaeto the Great. To the north and northwest, the country is bordered by China and by Russia along the Amnok and Tumen rivers; it is bordered to the south by South Korea, with the heavily fortified Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) separating the two. Nevertheless, North Korea, like its southern counterpart, claims to be the legitimate government of the entire peninsula and adjacent islands.

Hangul Native alphabet of the Korean language

The Korean alphabet, known as Hangul, has been used to write the Korean language since its creation in the 15th century by King Sejong the Great. It may also be written as Hangeul following the standard Romanization.

Hanja Korean language characters of Chinese origin

Hanja is the Korean name for Chinese characters. More specifically, it refers to those Chinese characters borrowed from Chinese and incorporated into the Korean language with Korean pronunciation. Hanja-mal or Hanja-eo refers to words that can be written with Hanja, and hanmun refers to Classical Chinese writing, although "Hanja" is sometimes used loosely to encompass these other concepts. Because Hanja never underwent major reform, they are almost entirely identical to traditional Chinese and kyūjitai characters, though the stroke orders for some characters are slightly different. For example, the characters and are written as 敎 and 硏. Only a small number of Hanja characters are modified or unique to Korean. By contrast, many of the Chinese characters currently in use in Japan and Mainland China have been simplified, and contain fewer strokes than the corresponding Hanja characters.

Contents

The county borders the People's Republic of China to the northeast. With the exception of the southwest, it is dominated by low hills, with occasional plains. The highest point is Songjinsan (1,146 m (3,760 ft)). The dominant river is the Tumen, which separates the county from China. The level ground along the Tumen is developed, but approximately 80% of the county is forested.

Tumen River river in China, Russia and North Korea

The Tumen River, also known as the Tuman or Duman River, is a 521-kilometre (324 mi) long river that serves as part of the boundary between China, North Korea and Russia, rising on the slopes of Mount Paektu and flowing into Sea of Japan. The river has a drainage basin of 33,800 km2.

Mining, particularly coal mining, is the chief industry in Undok, where lignite is found; Undok is the site of the Aoji Coal Mine. In addition, farming and livestock raising are widespread. The chief crops are maize, rice, soybeans, and potatoes. The Aoji-ri Chemical Complex is located in the county as well.

Coal mining Process of getting coal out of the ground

Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States, "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used.

Lignite A soft, brown, combustible, sedimentary rock

Lignite, often referred to as brown coal, is a soft, brown, combustible, sedimentary rock formed from naturally compressed peat. It is considered the lowest rank of coal due to its relatively low heat content. It has a carbon content around 60–70 percent. It is mined all around the world, is used almost exclusively as a fuel for steam-electric power generation, and is the coal which is most harmful to health.

The Aoji-ri Chemical Complex is a large industrial complex in Haksong-ri, Kyŏnghŭng county, South P'yŏngan province, North Korea, which produces about 51 different products, including methane, ammonia, ammonium bicarbonate, and coal tar derivatives. It also allegedly produces blood agents and vomiting agents, including Adamsite.

Undok lies on the Hambuk Line and Hoeam Line railroads.

Hambuk Line trunk line of the North Korean State Railway

The Hambuk Line is an electrified standard-gauge trunk line of the Korean State Railway in North Korea, running from Ch'ŏngjin) on the P'yŏngra Line to Rajin, likewise on the P'yŏngra line.

Hoeam Line

The Hoeam Line is a 10.4 km (6.5 mi) non-electrified secondary line of the Korean State Railway in Kyŏnghŭng County, North Hamgyŏng province, North Korea, running from Haksong on the Hambuk Line to Obong.

History

Under Joseon period "Kyunghung", the ancient name of Undok, was one of the six post/garrisons (Chosŏn'gŭl : 육진; Hancha : 六鎭) establish under the order of King Sejong the Great of Joseon in 1433, to safeguard his people from the hostile Chinese and Manchurian nomads living in Manchuria

Manchuria geographic region in Northeast Asia

Manchuria is a name first used in the 17th century by Japanese people to refer to a large geographic region in Northeast Asia. Depending on the context, Manchuria can either refer to a region that falls entirely within the People's Republic of China or a larger region divided between China and Russia. "Manchuria" is widely used outside China to denote the geographical and historical region. This region is the traditional homeland of the Koreans, Xianbei, Khitan, and Jurchen peoples, who built several states within the area historically.

Notable personalities

Administrative divisions

Kyŏnghŭng County is divided into 1 town ("Ŭp") 12 villages ("Ri") and 3 worker's districts ("Rodongjagu").

Chosŏn'gŭl Hancha
Ŭndŏk-ŭp은덕읍恩德邑
Myŏngryong-rodongjagu명룡노동자구明龍勞動者區
Obong-rodongjagu오봉노동자구梧鳳勞動者區
Ryongyŏl-lodongjagu룡연노동자구龍淵勞動者區
Angil-li안길리安吉里
Changp'yŏng-ri장평리長坪里
Ch'ŏlju-ri철주리鐵柱里
Haksong-ri학송리鶴松里
Kŭmsong-ri금송리金松里
Kwirang-ri귀락리貴洛里
Myŏngdŏng-ri명덕리明德里
Rokya-ri록야리鹿野里
Sin'asal-li신아산리新阿山里
Songhang-ri송학리松鶴里
Songsal-li송산리松山里
T'aeyang-ri태양리太陽里

See also

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