Kyongwon County

Last updated
Kyongwon County

경원군
Korean transcription(s)
  Hanja慶源郡
  McCune–ReischauerKyŏngwŏn-gun
  Revised RomanizationGyeongwon-gun
DPRK2006 Hambuk-Saepyol.PNG
Map of North Hamgyong showing the location of Kyongwon
Country North Korea
Region Kwanbuk
Province North Hamgyong
Administrative divisions 1 ŭp, 3 rodongjagu, 21 ri
Area
  Total888 km2 (343 sq mi)
Population
 (2008) [1]
  Total107,327

Kyŏngwŏn County is a kun, or county, in North Hamgyong province, North Korea, located at 42°48′41″N130°11′58″E / 42.81139°N 130.19944°E / 42.81139; 130.19944 Coordinates: 42°48′41″N130°11′58″E / 42.81139°N 130.19944°E / 42.81139; 130.19944 , formerly known as Saebyŏl. It is bordered by the People's Republic of China to the north and east, Kyonghung to the southeast, Hoeryong to the southwest, and Onsong to the west.

Contents

The western region of Kyongwon is mountainous, while the east is relatively flat. The highest point is Chungsan. The largest river is the Tumen, which flows along the eastern border. Numerous tributaries of the Tumen also flow through the county. Approximately 75% of the county is forested.

Aside from agriculture, livestock raising and sericulture are widespread. The chief local crops are rice, corn, and soybeans. Bituminous coal is also mined.

Railroads passing through Kyongwon include the Hambuk and Kogonwon Lines. It is also connected by Shatuozi Border Road bridge to the Chinese city of Hunchun in the Yanbian autonomous prefecture.

History

Under Joseon period Kyongwon was invaded by Jurchens tribes in 1409. Therefore, to safeguard his people from the hostile Chinese and Jurchen people (later known as Manchus) living in Manchuria, King Sejong the Great of Joseon ordered to establish there one of the six post/garrisons (hangul :육진 hanja :六鎭) in 1433. In 1977 the county's name was changed to Saebyol, but it was later reverted. [2]

Administrative divisions

Kyongwon County is divided into 1 town ("ŭp") 21 villages ("ri") and 3 worker's districts ("rodongjagu", abbreviated as "gu"). [2] [3]

  • Kyŏngwŏn-ŭp (Korean : 경원읍; Hanja : 慶源邑)
  • Hamyŏl-lodongjagu (Korean : 하면로동자구; Hanja : 下面勞動者區)
  • Kogŏnwŏl-lodongjagu (Korean : 고건원로동자구; Hanja : 古乾原勞動者區)
  • Ryongbung-rodongjagu (Korean : 룡북로동자구; Hanja : 龍北勞動者區)
  • Anwŏl-li (Korean : 안원리; Hanja : 安原里)
  • Chongsal-li (Korean : 종산리; Hanja : 鍾山里)
  • Chung'yŏng-ri (Korean : 중영리; Hanja : 中榮里)
  • Hunyung-ri (Korean : 훈융리; Hanja : 訓戎里)
  • Husŏng-ri (Korean : 후석리; Hanja : 厚石里)
  • Kŭmdong-ri (Korean : 금동리; Hanja : 金洞里)
  • Nongp'o-ri (Korean : 농포리; Hanja : 農圃里)
  • Pongsal-li (Korean : 봉산리; Hanja : 鳳山里)
  • Ryangdong-ri (Korean : 량동리; Hanja : 良洞里)

Note: The Korean syllabe "som" (섬) in Ryudasom-ri, is converted into hanja "do" 島 because both of them means island in that case.

See also

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References

  1. DPR Korean Central Bureau of Statistics: 2008 Population Census Archived 2010-03-31 at the Wayback Machine (Population 2008, published in 2009)
  2. 1 2 "함경북도 경원군 개요 - 북한지역정보넷". North Korean Human geography. The Institute for Peace Affairs. Retrieved 21 February 2013.
  3. "새별군 - 북한지명사전". North Korea Net. JoongAng Ilbo . Retrieved 26 February 2013.