Kyoto

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Kyoto
京都市
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Sagaogurayama Tabuchiyamacho, Ukyo Ward, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 616-8394, Japan - panoramio.jpg
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Kyoto
Kyoto in Kyoto Prefecture Ja.svg
Location of Kyoto in Kyoto Prefecture
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Kyoto
 
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Kyoto
Kyoto (Asia)
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Kyoto
Kyoto (Earth)
Coordinates: 35°0′42″N135°46′6″E / 35.01167°N 135.76833°E / 35.01167; 135.76833
Country Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
Region Kansai
Prefecture Kyoto Prefecture
Founded794
Government
  Type Mayor–council
  BodyKyoto City Assembly
  Mayor Kōji Matsui (松井孝治) (from February 2024)
Area
   Designated city 827.83 km2 (319.63 sq mi)
Highest elevation
971 m (3,186 ft)
Lowest elevation
9 m (30 ft)
Population
 (October 1, 2020) [1]
   Designated city 1,463,723
  Rank 9th, Japan
  Density1,800/km2 (4,600/sq mi)
   Metro 3,783,014
Time zone UTC+9 (Japan Standard Time)
- Tree Weeping Willow, Japanese Maple and Katsura
- Flower Camellia, Azalea and Sugar Cherry
Website city.kyoto.lg.jp

Sports

Kyudo archers participating in the Omato Archery Competition at Sanjusangen-do Toshi-ya.JPG
Kyūdō archers participating in the Ōmato Archery Competition at Sanjūsangen-dō

Kyoto has been the site of many annual sporting events, ranging from the 400-year-old Tōshiya archery exhibition held at the Sanjūsangen-dō Temple to the Kyoto Marathon and the Shimadzu All Japan Indoor Tennis Championships.

Several sports teams are based in Kyoto, including professional football and basketball teams. In football, Kyoto has been represented by Kyoto Sanga FC, a club which won the Emperor's Cup in 2002 and rose to J. League's Division 1 in 2005. Kyoto Sanga began as an amateur non-company club in the 1920s, making it the J. League team with the longest history, although it was only after professionalization in the 1990s that it was able to compete in the Japanese top division. Until 2019, Kyoto Sanga used Takebishi Stadium Kyoto in Ukyō-ku as its home stadium, but home matches were moved to the city of Kameoka, Kyoto in 2020. There are also several amateur football clubs based in Kyoto. The amateur clubs AS Laranja Kyoto, Ococias Kyoto AC, and Kyoto Shiko Soccer Club compete in the regional Kansai Soccer League.

Another professional team based in Kyoto is the Kyoto Hannaryz, a men's basketball team in the First Division of the B.League that plays its home games at the Kyoto City Gymnasium in Ukyō-ku. Kyoto has also been the home of other professional teams that have subsequently moved or been disbanded. Between 1949 and 1952, the Central League professional baseball team Shochiku Robins played home games at Kinugasa Ballpark in Kita-ku and Nishi-Kyōgoku Baseball Park (now known as Wakasa Stadium) in Ukyō-ku. This team eventually became the Yokohama DeNA BayStars. Kyoto also hosted two teams in the Japan Women's Baseball League before the league folded in 2021.

Company teams in Kyoto include two rugby squads, the Mitsubishi Motors Kyoto Red Evolutions and the Shimadzu Breakers, which compete in the Kansai regional rugby league Top West. In baseball, company teams have competed in the regional JABA Kyoto Tournament annually since 1947.

Kyoto Racecourse in Fushimi-ku is one of ten racecourses operated by the Japan Racing Association. It hosts notable horse races including the Kikuka-shō, Spring Tenno Sho, and Queen Elizabeth II Cup.

International relations

Twin towns – Sister cities

The city of Kyoto has sister-city relationships with the following cities: [48]

  • Flag of the United States.svg Boston, United States (since June 1959)
  • Flag of Germany.svg Cologne, Germany (since May 1963)
  • Flag of Italy.svg Florence, Italy (since September 1965)
  • Flag of Mexico.svg Guadalajara, Mexico (since October 1980) [49]
  • Flag of Ukraine.svg Kyiv, Ukraine (since September 1971)
  • Flag of the Czech Republic.svg Prague, Czech Republic (since April 1996) [50]
  • Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg Xi'an, China (since May 1974, friendship city)
  • Flag of Croatia.svg Zagreb, Croatia (since October 1981)

Partner cities

In addition to its sister city arrangements which involve multi-faceted cooperation, Kyoto has created a system of "partner cities" which focus on cooperation based on a particular topic. At present, Kyoto has partner-city arrangements with the following cities: [51]

See also

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kyoto Prefecture</span> Prefecture of Japan

Kyoto Prefecture is a prefecture of Japan located in the Kansai region of Honshu. Kyoto Prefecture has a population of 2,561,358 and has a geographic area of 4,612 square kilometres (1,781 sq mi). Kyoto Prefecture borders Fukui Prefecture to the northeast, Shiga Prefecture to the east, Mie Prefecture to the southeast, Nara Prefecture and Osaka Prefecture to the south, and Hyōgo Prefecture to the west.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ukyō-ku, Kyoto</span> Ward of Kyoto in Kinki, Japan

Ukyō-ku (右京区) is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Fushimi-ku, Kyoto</span> Ward of Kyoto in Kinki, Japan

Fushimi is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan. Famous places in Fushimi include the Fushimi Inari Shrine, with thousands of torii lining the paths up and down a mountain; Fushimi Castle, originally built by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, with its rebuilt towers and gold-lined tea-room; and the Teradaya, an inn at which Sakamoto Ryōma was attacked and injured about a year before his assassination. Also of note is the Gokōgu shrine, which houses a stone used in the construction of Fushimi Castle. The water in the shrine is particularly famous and it is recorded as one of Japan's 100 best clear water spots.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Sakyō-ku, Kyoto</span> Ward of Kyoto in Japan

Sakyō-ku is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan. It is located in the northeastern part of the city.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Shijō Kawaramachi</span> Part of central Kyoto, Japan

Shijō Kawaramachi (四条河原町) is a vibrant part of central Kyoto, Japan where Shijō and Kawaramachi Streets intersect. Kawaramachi Street runs parallel to the Kamo River on the eastern side of Kyoto, while Shijō Street runs east–west through the center of the city.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Ōtsu</span> Core city in Kansai

Ōtsu is the capital city of Shiga Prefecture, Japan. As of 1 October 2021, the city had an estimated population of 343,991 in 153,458 households and a population density of 740 persons per km2. The total area of the city is 464.51 square kilometres (179.35 sq mi).

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art</span> Mosque in Kyoto, Japan

The Kyoto City KYOCERA Museum of Art (京都市京セラ美術館) is located in Okazaki Park in Sakyō-ku Kyoto. Formerly Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art, it is one of the oldest art museums in Japan. it opened in 1928 as Shōwa Imperial Coronation Art Museum of Kyoto, a commemoration of Emperor Hirohito's coronation.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Shijō Street</span> Street in Kyoto, Japan

Shijō Street runs in the center of Kyoto, Japan from east to west through the commercial center of the city. Shijō literally means Fourth Avenue of Heian-kyō, the ancient capital.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Marutamachi Station</span> Metro station in Kyoto, Japan

Marutamachi Station is a train station on the Kyoto Municipal Subway Karasuma Line in Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Jingū-Marutamachi Station</span> Railway station in Kyoto, Japan

Jingū-Marutamachi Station (神宮丸太町駅) is a railway station on the Keihan Ōtō Line located in Sakyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Karasuma Oike Station</span> Metro station in Kyoto, Japan

Karasuma Oike Station is a train station on the Kyoto Municipal Subway Karasuma Line and Tōzai Line in Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Kokusaikaikan Station</span> Metro station in Kyoto, Japan

Kokusaikaikan Station is a train station on the Kyoto Municipal Subway Karasuma Line in Sakyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan. It is the beginning of the line, and was opened on 3 June 1997.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Nijō Station (Kyoto)</span> Railway and metro station in Kyoto, Japan

Nijō Station is a train station in Nakagyō-ku, Kyoto, Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Higashiyama Station (Kyoto)</span> Metro station in Kyoto, Japan

Higashiyama Station is a train station on the Kyoto Municipal Subway Tōzai Line in Higashiyama-ku, city of Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Gion-Shijō Station</span> Railway station in Kyoto, Japan

Gion-Shijō Station (祇園四条駅) is a railway station on the Keihan Main Line in Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto, Japan, operated by the private railway operator Keihan Electric Railway.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Demachiyanagi Station</span> Railway station in Kyoto, Japan

Demachiyanagi Station is a railway station located in Sakyō-ku, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Muromachi Street</span> Street in Kyoto, Japan

Muromachi Street is a street in Kyoto, Japan. Originally a path called Muromachi kōji (室町小路) in Heian-kyō, the ancient capital that preceded Kyoto, it lies to the west of Karasuma Street and runs north-south from Kitayama Street in Kita-ku to Kuzebashi Street in Minami-ku. En route, it is blocked by Higashi Hongan-ji Temple and Kyoto Station.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Hara school of painters</span> Japanese painting atelier

The Hara School was a Kyoto-based Japanese painting atelier established in the late Edo era, which continued as a family-controlled enterprise through the early 20th century. The Hara artists were imperial court painters and exerted great influence within Kyoto art circles. They contributed paintings to various temples and shrines, as well as to the Kyoto Imperial Palace.

Greater Kyoto is a metropolitan area in Japan encompassing Kyoto City, the capital of Kyoto Prefecture, as well as its surrounding areas including Ōtsu, the capital of Shiga Prefecture.

Sanjō Street is a major street that crosses the center of the city of Kyoto from east to west, running from Shinomiya in the Yamashina-ku ward (east) to the vicinity of the Tenryū-ji in Arashiyama (west).

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Kyoto
Kyoto (Chinese characters).svg
"Kyoto" in kanji