Léonard Godefroy de Tonnancour

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Léonard Godefroy de Tonnancour (November 6, 1793 January 29, 1867) was a political figure in Lower Canada.

Lower Canada 19th century British colony in present-day Quebec

The Province of Lower Canada was a British colony on the lower Saint Lawrence River and the shores of the Gulf of Saint Lawrence (1791–1841). It covered the southern portion of the current-day Province of Quebec, Canada, and the Labrador region of the modern-day Province of Newfoundland and Labrador.

He was born in Saint-Michel-d'Yamaska in 1793, the son of seigneur Joseph-Marie Godefroy de Tonnancour, and studied at the Séminaire de Nicolet. He worked as an administrator on the family estates. He inherited part of the seigneuries of Yamaska and Saint-François, as well as property in Acton County, in 1834. Godefroy de Tonnancour was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada for Yamaska in an 1832 by-election; he was reelected in 1834. He voted in support of the Ninety-Two Resolutions. [1] After the constitution was suspended in 1838, Godefroy de Tonnancour retired from politics. In 1835, he had married Marguerite, the daughter of Benjamin-Hyacinthe-Martin Cherrier, surveyor and former member of the legislative assembly.

Yamaska, Quebec Municipality in Quebec, Canada

Yamaska is a municipality in the Pierre-De Saurel Regional County Municipality, in the Montérégie region of Quebec. The population as of the Canada 2011 Census was 1,644.

Seigneurial system of New France semi-feudal manor system of French Canada

The manorial system of New France was the semi-feudal system of land tenure used in the North American French colonial empire.

Joseph-Marie Godefroy de Tonnancour Canadian politician

Joseph-Marie Godefroy de Tonnancour was a seigneur and political figure in Lower Canada.

He died at Saint-Michel-d’Yamaska in 1867.

His older brother Marie-Joseph became co-seigneur after the death of their father and also was a member of the legislative assembly.

Marie-Joseph Godefroy de Tonnancour was a seigneur and political figure in Lower Canada. He represented Trois-Rivières in the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada in 1820.

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The term Tonnancour may refer to:

References

The Dictionary of Canadian Biography is a dictionary of biographical entries for individuals who have contributed to the history of Canada. The DCB, which was initiated in 1959, is a collaboration between the University of Toronto and Laval University. Fifteen volumes have so far been published with more than 8,400 biographies of individuals who died or whose last known activity fell between the years 1000 and 1930. The entire print edition is online, along with some additional biographies to the year 2000.

National Assembly of Quebec single house of the Legislature of Quebec

The National Assembly of Quebec is the legislative body of the province of Quebec in Canada. Legislators are called MNAs. The Queen in Right of Quebec, represented by the Lieutenant Governor of Quebec and the National Assembly compose the Legislature of Quebec, which operates in a fashion similar to those of other Westminster-style parliamentary systems.