L'Homme

Last updated
L'Homme 
Discipline Anthropology
Language French
Edited byCléo Carastro and Caterina Guenzi
Publication details
Publication history
1961-present
Publisher
FrequencyQuarterly
Standard abbreviations
Homme
Indexing
ISSN 0439-4216
OCLC  no. 1752231
Links

L'Homme. Revue française d'anthropologie, is a French anthropological journal established in 1961 by Émile Benveniste, Pierre Gourou, and Claude Lévi-Strauss at the École pratique des hautes études, as a French counterpart to Man and American Anthropologist . [1]

Anthropology is the scientific study of humans and human behavior and societies in the past and present. Social anthropology and cultural anthropology study the norms and values of societies. Linguistic anthropology studies how language affects social life. Biological or physical anthropology studies the biological development of humans.

Academic journal peer-reviewed periodical relating to a particular academic discipline

An academic or scholarly journal is a periodical publication in which scholarship relating to a particular academic discipline is published. Academic journals serve as permanent and transparent forums for the presentation, scrutiny, and discussion of research. They are usually peer-reviewed or refereed. Content typically takes the form of articles presenting original research, review articles, and book reviews. The purpose of an academic journal, according to Henry Oldenburg, is to give researchers a venue to "impart their knowledge to one another, and contribute what they can to the Grand design of improving natural knowledge, and perfecting all Philosophical Arts, and Sciences."

Émile Benveniste was a French structural linguist and semiotician. He is best known for his work on Indo-European languages and his critical reformulation of the linguistic paradigm established by Ferdinand de Saussure.

In 1996 the editorship passed from Jean Pouillon, who had held the post from the journal's inception, to Jean Jamin. Since 2016, Cléo Carastro and Caterina Guenzi are the two editors of the journal.

Related Research Articles

Jean Cocteau French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, boxing manager and filmmaker

Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau was a French poet, playwright, novelist, designer, filmmaker, visual artist and critic. Cocteau is best known for his novels Le Grand Écart (1923), Le Livre Blanc (1928) and Les Enfants Terribles (1929), the stage plays Le Voix Humaine (1930), La Machine Infernale (1934), Les Parents terribles (1938), La Machine à écrire (1941) and L'Aigle à deux têtes (1946) and the films The Blood of a Poet (1930), Les Parents Terribles (1948), from his own eponymous piéce, Beauty and the Beast (1946), Orpheus (1949) and Testament of Orpheus (1960), which alongside Blood of a Poet and Orpheus constitute the so-called Orphic Trilogy. He was described as "one of [the] avant-garde's most successful and influential filmmakers" by AllMovie.

Jean-Paul Sartre French existentialist philosopher, playwright, novelist, screenwriter, political activist, biographer, and literary critic

Jean-Paul Charles Aymard Sartre was a French philosopher, playwright, novelist, political activist, biographer, and literary critic. He was one of the key figures in the philosophy of existentialism and phenomenology, and one of the leading figures in 20th-century French philosophy and Marxism. His work has also influenced sociology, critical theory, post-colonial theory, and literary studies, and continues to influence these disciplines.

Jean Genet French novelist, playwright, poet and political activist

Jean Genet was a French novelist, playwright, poet, essayist, and political activist. Early in his life he was a vagabond and petty criminal, but he later took to writing. His major works include the novels The Thief's Journal and Our Lady of the Flowers, and the plays The Balcony, The Maids and The Screens.

Bibliothèque nationale de France National Library of France

The Bibliothèque nationale de France is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France and also holds extensive historical collections.

French Academy of Sciences learned society, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV at the suggestion of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, to encourage and protect the spirit of French scientific research

The French Academy of Sciences is a learned society, founded in 1666 by Louis XIV at the suggestion of Jean-Baptiste Colbert, to encourage and protect the spirit of French scientific research. It was at the forefront of scientific developments in Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries, and is one of the earliest Academies of Sciences.

Jean Cabanis German ornithologist

Jean Louis Cabanis was a German ornithologist.

Jean-Pierre Melville French film director

Jean-Pierre Melville was a French filmmaker.

<i>Le Journal de Québec</i> Canadian newspaper, published since 1967

Le Journal de Québec is a French-language daily newspaper in Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. The newspaper is printed in tabloid format and has the highest circulation for a Quebec City newspaper, with its closest competitor being Le Soleil.

Jean-Yves Le Drian French politician

Jean-Yves Le Drian is a French politician serving as Minister of Europe and Foreign Affairs since 2017. He previously was Minister of Defence from 2012 to 2017 under President François Hollande. He was nominated by Emmanuel Macron to serve as Foreign Minister in the First Philippe government on 17 May 2017. A former member of the Socialist Party, he has been an Independent since 2018.

Jean-Pierre Thiollet French author

Jean-Pierre Thiollet is a French writer and journalist.

Jean Dujardin French actor

Jean Dujardin is a French actor, comedian, humorist and television director. He began his career as a stand-up comedian in Paris before guest starring in comedic television programmes and films. He first came to prominence with the cult TV series Un gars, une fille, in which he starred alongside his lover Alexandra Lamy, before gaining success in film with movies such as Brice de Nice, Michel Hazanavicius's OSS 117: Cairo, Nest of Spies and its sequel OSS 117: Lost in Rio, as well as 99 Francs.

Jean Jaurès French / Occitan Socialist leader

Auguste Marie Joseph Jean Léon Jaurès, commonly referred to as Jean Jaurès, was a French Socialist leader. Initially a moderate republican, he was later one of the first social democrats, becoming the leader, in 1902, of the French Socialist Party, which opposed Jules Guesde's revolutionary Socialist Party of France. The two parties merged in 1905 in the French Section of the Workers' International (SFIO). An antimilitarist, Jaurès was assassinated at the outbreak of World War I, and remains one of the main historical figures of the French Left.

Second constituency for French residents overseas constituency of the French Fifth Republic

The Second constituency for French residents overseas is one of eleven constituencies each electing one representative of French citizens overseas to the French National Assembly.

Sixth constituency for French residents overseas constituency for French residents overseas

The Sixth constituency for French residents overseas is one of eleven constituencies each electing one representative of French citizens overseas to the French National Assembly.

Ninth constituency for French residents overseas constituency of the French Fifth Republic

The Ninth constituency for French residents overseas is one of eleven constituencies each electing one representative of French citizens overseas to the French National Assembly.

Tenth constituency for French residents overseas constituency for French residents overseas

The Tenth constituency for French residents overseas is one of eleven constituencies each electing one representative of French citizens overseas to the French National Assembly.

Events from the year 1665 in France.

2019 European Parliament election in France 2019 election for members of the European Parliament in France

The 2019 European Parliament election in France were held on 26 May 2019, electing members of the 9th French delegation to the European Parliament as part of the elections held across the European Union. The election featured two major changes since the 2014 election: the return to a single national constituency and the increase in the number of French seats from 74 to 79 upon the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union. Officially, 79 MEPs were considered to have been elected, including five "virtual" MEPs who will not take their seats until the UK formally leaves the EU. The election featured 34 separate electoral lists, a record number at the national level.

Events from the year 1657 in France

References

  1. François Dosse, History of Structuralism, Volume 1, translated by Deborah Glassman (University of Minnesota Press, 1997), pp. 5, 186.