L. G. Dupre

Last updated
L.G. Dupre
L.G. Dupre - 1955 Bowman.jpg
Dupre on a 1955 Bowman football card
No. 45
Position: Halfback
Personal information
Born:(1932-09-10)September 10, 1932
New Orleans, Louisiana
Died:August 9, 2001(2001-08-09) (aged 68)
Texas City, Texas
Height:5 ft 11 in (1.80 m)
Weight:190 lb (86 kg)
Career information
High school: Texas City (TX)
College: Baylor
NFL Draft: 1955  / Round: 3 / Pick: 27
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Games played:69
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Louis George Dupre (September 10, 1932 – August 9, 2001) was a professional American football running back in the National Football League for the Baltimore Colts and Dallas Cowboys. He played college football at Baylor University.

Contents

Early years

Dupre attended Texas City High School. He accepted a football scholarship from Baylor University. In 1953, he was part of a backfield that became known as the “Fearsome Foursome”, that comprised him, quarterback Cotton Davidson, halfback Jerry Coody and fullback Allen Jones. That season, he set a school record by rushing for 593 yards. [1]

In his last two years at Baylor, the team went 7–3 and 7–4 and played in the Gator Bowl in 1954. He played a key role in the 1955 College All-Star's victory over the Cleveland Browns.

He was given the nickname "Long Gone" by sportscaster Kern Tips. He finished his career with 311 carries for 1,423 yards and 19 touchdowns. In 1981, he was inducted into Baylor's Athletic Hall of Fame. [2]

Professional career

Baltimore Colts

Dupre was selected by the Baltimore Colts in the third-round (27th overall) of the 1955 NFL Draft. As a rookie, he was second on the team in rushing (behind Alan Ameche), registering 88 carries for 338 yards, with most of his production coming after the fifth game.

In 1956 with the addition of rookie Lenny Moore, he was forced to develop into a receiver out of the backfield and was third on the team with 216 receiving yards. His production would decrease in the following seasons, with Moore taking a bigger role in the offense. He also was a part-time punter.

In 1957, he was fourth on the team with 32 receptions for 339 yards. He was a part of the 1958 NFL Championship Game against the New York Giants, famously known as "The Greatest Game Ever Played". He started the game by gaining 30 yards on 10 carries.

In 1959, Dupre played in only the first 4 regular games of the season. His only touchdown was a 2-yard pass from John Unitas against the Chicago Bears on October 18. He sustained a season-ending injury while driving home from a Tuesday practice. He put on the brakes and felt something pop in his leg, that caused ruptured blood vessels in his thigh. Dupre was a member of the 1959 Baltimore Colts championship team, but due to his injury, he did not play in the rematch against the Giants, which the Colts won 31-16. Halfback Mike Sommer substituted for Dupre in the 1959 NFL Championship Game.

Dallas Cowboys

Dupre was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the 1960 NFL Expansion Draft. In the Cowboys 1960 inaugural season, he led the team in rushing with 104 carries for 362 yards in 11 games (5 starts). He also scored 3 touchdowns in the tie against the New York Giants, helping avoid losing all of the games in the season.

In 1961, his role was reduced with the emergence of Don Perkins and Amos Marsh. He was released on September 4, 1962. [3]

A Baltimore Sun article on October 2, 1962, indicated that the Baltimore Colts were interested in signing him to replace Lenny Moore, in case his injuries were serious enough to keep him from playing. The Sun reporter spoke with Dupre's wife in Dallas and she explained that Dupre had to first check with his employer (General Electric) about a leave of absence. She indicated that he had a good job and did not want to lose it. His wife was still Sissy Dupre. He stayed retired from professional football and did not return to Baltimore.

Personal life

Dupre married wife Alda Maxine (Sissy) Dupre on February 4, 1955 in Waco, Texas. He was a survivor of the 1947 Texas City explosion disaster that killed 650 people. On August 9, 2001, he died after a lengthy battle with cancer. [4] His brother Charlie Dupre also played football in Baylor University and in the National Football League.

While playing in Baltimore, Dupre worked for Bethlehem Steel and Montgomery Wards during the off season. In 1959, Dupre was involved in a bowling establishment venture with Unitas, who served as president of "The Pro Bowl", whilst Dupre was executive V.P. Apparently, the business relationship ended relatively quickly: when Unitas was sued in July 1964 by bowling manufacturer, Brunswick Corporation, Dupre's name and "The Pro Bowl" were nowhere in sight. Instead, the names of Colts owner Carroll Rosenbloom and Colts General Manager Donald Kellet were included in the suit.

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References

  1. "Baylor's 'Fearsome Foursome' Vs. Ellis & Co" . Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  2. "Former All-American Dupre Passes Away" . Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  3. Buck, Ray (February 15, 2008). "From meager beginnings to America's Team". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved February 3, 2020.
  4. "L.G. Dupre, 68, Colts Running Back" . Retrieved February 3, 2020.