LaVell Edwards

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LaVell Edwards
Edwards2010.jpg
Edwards in 2010
Biographical details
Born(1930-10-11)October 11, 1930
Orem, Utah
DiedDecember 29, 2016(2016-12-29) (aged 86)
Provo, Utah
Alma mater Utah State University (B.A.)
University of Utah (M.Ed.)
Brigham Young University (Ed.D.)
Playing career
1949–1951 Utah State
Position(s) Offensive lineman
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1954–1961 Granite HS (UT)
1962–1971 BYU (assistant)
1972–2000 BYU
Head coaching record
Overall257–101–3 (college)
Bowls7–14–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 National (1984)
18 WAC (1974, 1976–1985, 1989–1993, 1995–1996)
1 MWC (1999)
Awards
Bobby Dodd Coach of the Year Award (1979)
AFCA Coach of the Year (1984)
Eddie Robinson Coach of the Year (1984)
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award (2003)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2004 (profile)

Reuben LaVell Edwards (October 11, 1930 – December 29, 2016) [1] was an American football head coach for Brigham Young University (BYU). With 257 career victories, he ranked as one of the most successful college football coaches of all time. Among his many notable accomplishments, Edwards guided BYU to a national championship in 1984 and coached Heisman Trophy winner Ty Detmer in 1990.

American football Team field sport

American football, referred to as football in the United States and Canada and also known as gridiron, is a team sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field with goalposts at each end. The offense, which is the team controlling the oval-shaped football, attempts to advance down the field by running with or passing the ball, while the defense, which is the team without control of the ball, aims to stop the offense's advance and aims to take control of the ball for themselves. The offense must advance at least ten yards in four downs, or plays, and otherwise they turn over the football to the defense; if the offense succeeds in advancing ten yards or more, they are given a new set of four downs. Points are primarily scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown or kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

Brigham Young University private research university located in Provo, Utah, United States

Brigham Young University is a private, non-profit research university in Provo, Utah, United States completely owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and run under the auspices of its Church Educational System. Approximately 99 percent of the students are members of the LDS Church and one-third of its U.S. students are from Utah. The university's primary focus is on undergraduate education, but it also has 68 master's and 25 doctoral degree programs.

A national championship in the highest level of college football in the United States, currently the NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS), is a designation awarded annually by various organizations to their selection of the best college football team. Division I FBS football is the only National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sport for which the NCAA does not sanction a yearly championship event. As such, it is sometimes unofficially referred to as a "mythical national championship".

Contents

Edwards played football for Utah State University and earned a master's degree at the University of Utah prior to coaching at BYU, where he also earned his doctorate.

Utah State University university

Utah State University is a public land-grant research university in Logan, Utah. It is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. With nearly 20,000 students living on or near campus, USU is Utah's largest public residential campus. As of Fall 2018, there were 27,932 students enrolled including 24,880 undergraduate students and 3,052 graduate students. The university has the highest percentage of out-of-state students of any public university in Utah totaling 23% of the student body.

University of Utah public coeducational space-grant research university in Salt Lake City, Utah

The University of Utah is a public research university in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. As the state's flagship university, it offers more than 100 undergraduate majors and more than 92 graduate degree programs. The university is classified among "R-1: Doctoral Universities – Highest Research Activity" with "selective" admissions. Graduate studies include the S.J. Quinney College of Law and the School of Medicine, Utah's first medical school. As of Fall 2015, there are 23,909 undergraduate students and 7,764 graduate students, for an enrollment total of 31,673.

BYU Cougars football

The BYU Cougars football team is the college football program representing Brigham Young University (BYU), a private university owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and located in Provo, Utah. The Cougars began collegiate football competition in 1922, and have won 23 conference championships and one national championship in 1984. The team has competed in several different athletic conferences during its history, but since July 1, 2011, they have competed as an Independent. The team plays home games at the 63,470-seat LaVell Edwards Stadium, which is named after legendary head coach LaVell Edwards. LaVell Edwards won 19 conference championships, seven bowl games, and one national championship (1984) while coaching at BYU, and is regarded as the most successful coach in BYU program history.

Coaching career

Edwards was BYU's head football coach from 1972 to 2000. [2] [3] [4] His offensive scheme was passing-dominated. [5] He started coaching in an era when college football offenses were dominated by strong running attacks. [5] His quarterbacks threw over 11,000 passes for more than 100,000 yards and 635 touchdowns. [1] He got the idea to switch to a pass oriented team by looking at BYU's history. The BYU football program had struggled before Edwards [6] [7] with the notable exception of one conference championship that resulted from the aerial attack of Virgil Carter. This past success encouraged Edwards to open up the BYU offense.

Virgil R. Carter is a former professional American football quarterback who played in the National Football League and the World Football League from 1967 through 1976.

Edwards coached prominent quarterbacks such as Steve Young, Jim McMahon, Ty Detmer, Marc Wilson, Robbie Bosco, Gary Scheide, Gifford Nielsen and Steve Sarkisian. [1] [3] [5]

Steve Young American football quarterback

Jon Steven Young is a former professional American football quarterback who played 15 seasons in the National Football League (NFL) and is best known for his 13 seasons with the San Francisco 49ers. He also played for the NFL Tampa Bay Buccaneers and the Los Angeles Express of the United States Football League (USFL). Young played college football for Brigham Young University, setting school and NCAA records en route to being runner-up for the 1983 Heisman Trophy.

Jim McMahon American football quarterback

James Robert McMahon, Jr. is a former American football player. He played college football at Brigham Young University, where he was a two-time All-American and later in the professional ranks with the Chicago Bears, San Diego Chargers, Philadelphia Eagles, Minnesota Vikings, Arizona Cardinals, Cleveland Browns, and Green Bay Packers. He won two Super Bowl titles, the first with the Bears in Super Bowl XX where he was the starting quarterback, and the second with their rivals, the Green Bay Packers, in Super Bowl XXXI where he was a backup to Brett Favre. Both Super Bowls were against the New England Patriots. McMahon was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 1998.

Ty Detmer American football quarterback and coach

Ty Hubert Detmer is an American football coach and former player. As a player, Detmer won the Heisman Trophy in 1990 while playing quarterback for Brigham Young University (BYU). He went on to play professionally in the National Football League (NFL) for fourteen seasons. He was the offensive coordinator at BYU from 2015 to 2017. At BYU, Detmer broke several NCAA records and was twice recognized as a consensus All-American. A late-round pick in the 1992 NFL Draft, Detmer played for five NFL teams, mostly in a back-up role. He is the older brother of former NFL quarterback Koy Detmer.

LaVell Edwards Stadium at Brigham Young University Lavell Edwards Stadium.jpg
LaVell Edwards Stadium at Brigham Young University

Awards won by his players include a Heisman Trophy, a Doak Walker Award, a Maxwell Award, two Outland Trophies, four Davey O'Brien Awards, seven Sammy Baugh Awards, [8] 34 All-America citations (including 10 consensus All-Americans), 11 conference player of the year and 24 Academic All-America player citations. [5]

Heisman Trophy annual award for outstanding college football player

The Heisman Memorial Trophy, is awarded annually to a player in NCAA football. Winners epitomize great ability combined with diligence, perseverance, and hard work. It is presented by the Heisman Trophy Trust in early December before the postseason bowl games.

The Doak Walker Award, first awarded in 1990, honors the top running back in college football in the United States. It is named in honor of Doak Walker, a star halfback in college for the SMU Mustangs and in the National Football League for the Detroit Lions. The 2018 winner of the Doak Walker Award was Jonathan Taylor of Wisconsin. The award requires all candidates to be:

The Maxwell Award is presented annually to the college football player judged by a panel of sportscasters, sportswriters, and National Collegiate Athletic Association head coaches and the membership of the Maxwell Football Club to be the best all-around in the United States. The award is named after Robert "Tiny" Maxwell, a Swarthmore College football player, coach and sportswriter. Johnny Lattner and Tim Tebow are the only players to have won the award twice. It is the college equivalent of the Bert Bell Award of the National Football League, also given out by the Maxwell Club.

In 1984, he was named National Coach of the Year after BYU finished the season 13–0 and won the National Championship. [1] [6] Edwards retired after the 2000 season with a 257–101–3 record. [1] [3] [5] [6]

Prior to Edwards' final game, the football stadium at BYU was renamed LaVell Edwards Stadium in his honor. [1] [7] [9] At the time of his retirement, he ranked sixth all-time in victories, [9] [10] and second all-time in victories with a single program (behind only Joe Paterno at Penn State). [11] Edwards received the Amos Alonzo Stagg Award, presented by the American Football Coaches Association, in 2003. [10]

In the 1980 Holiday Bowl, BYU rallied from a 45–25 deficit with only 4 minutes to play to defeat Southern Methodist University (SMU). [10]

Following the 1984 national championship, Edwards was offered the head coaching positions with the Detroit Lions as well as the University of Texas at Austin, but he turned down the offer. [10]

Accomplishments

Edwards carrying the Olympic Torch in 2002 LaVell Edwards Olympic Torch.JPG
Edwards carrying the Olympic Torch in 2002

Coaching tree

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
BYU Cougars (Western Athletic Conference)(1972–1998)
1972 BYU 7–45–2T–2nd
1973 BYU 5–63–4T–4th
1974 BYU 7–4–16–0–11stL Fiesta
1975 BYU 6–54–3T–4th
1976 BYU 9–36–1T–1stL Tangerine
1977 BYU 9–36–1T–1st1620
1978 BYU 9–45–11stL Holiday
1979 BYU 11–17–01stL Holiday 1213
1980 BYU 12–16–11stW Holiday 1112
1981 BYU 11–27–11stW Holiday 1113
1982 BYU 8–47–11stL Holiday
1983 BYU 11–17–01stW Holiday 77
1984 BYU 13–08–01stW Holiday 11
1985 BYU 11–37–11stL Florida Citrus 1716
1986 BYU 8–56–22ndL Freedom
1987 BYU 9–47–12ndL All-American
1988 BYU 9–45–3T–3rdW Freedom
1989 BYU 10–37–11stL Holiday 1822
1990 BYU 10–37–11stL Holiday 1722
1991 BYU 8–3–27–0–11stT Holiday 2323
1992 BYU 8–56–2T–1stL Aloha
1993 BYU 6–66–2T–1stL Holiday
1994 BYU 10–36–2T–2ndW Copper 1018
1995 BYU 7–46–2T–1st
1996 BYU 14–18–01st (Mountain)W Cotton 55
1997 BYU 6–54–45th (Mountain)
1998 BYU 9–57–1T–1st (Pacific)L Liberty
BYU Cougars (Mountain West Conference)(1999–2000)
1999 BYU 8–45–2T–1stL Motor City
2000 BYU 6–64–3T–3rd
BYU:257–101–3175–42–2
Total:257–101–3
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

Personal life

While head football coach at BYU, Edwards also earned a doctorate. [10] [19] [20]

Following his retirement from coaching, Edwards remained a prominent leader and speaker for members of the LDS Church, which owns and operates BYU. [21] He and his wife served an 18-month mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) in New York City during 2002–2003. [1] [22]

Death

Edwards suffered a broken hip on December 24, 2016 and died five days later at his home in Provo on December 29, at the age of 86. [1] [5] [6] A public memorial service was held at the Utah Valley Convention Center in Provo on January 6, 2017. A private funeral service for family and friends was then held the next day, on January 7. [23]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 "LaVell Edwards, Coach Who Led B.Y.U. to a Football Title, Dies at 86". The New York Times. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  2. 1 2 "LaVell Edwards, legendary BYU football coach, dead at 86". New York Daily News. December 30, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 "LaVell Edwards, who coached BYU for nearly 30 years, dies at 86". ESPN. December 30, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  4. "LaVell Edwards, head football coach at BYU from 1972 to 2000, dies at 86". Deseret News. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  5. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Herald, Jared Lloyd Daily. "Legendary BYU football coach LaVell Edwards dies at age 86" . Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  6. 1 2 3 4 "LaVell Edwards, who made BYU a football power, dies at 86". The Washington Post. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  7. 1 2 "BYU Football: Legendary football coach LaVell Edwards passes away". NCAA.com. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  8. "Former BYU Head Coach LaVell Edwards passes away at the age of 86". ESPN 960. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  9. 1 2 3 "Former BYU coach LaVell Edwards dies at the age of 86". USA Today. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  10. 1 2 3 4 5 "Timeline: LaVell Edwards through the years". Deseret News. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2016.
  11. "Former BYU head coach LaVell Edwards left a lasting legacy on the college football world but his greatest impact came off the field". SCOUT. December 30, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  12. "Beehive State sports year in review: 2016 was definitely 'the year of coming close'". Deseret News. December 30, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  13. "Legendary Hall of Fame college football coach LaVell Edwards dies at 86". KUTV.com. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  14. 1 2 "Legendary BYU football coach LaVell Edwards dies". Fansided. December 30, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  15. "BYU football: Edwards built great system, coaching staff". Deseret News. July 17, 2009. Retrieved January 1, 2017.
  16. 1 2 3 4 "Throwback Thursday: LaVell Edwards Coaching Tree". Fansided. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  17. 1 2 3 4 "Talo Steves wrote about the life and legacy of former BYU head coach LaVell Edwards after his passing yesterday". SCOUT. December 31, 2016. Retrieved January 1, 2017.
  18. 1 2 "RIP to BYU's LaVell Edwards, who built college football's unlikeliest champion". SB Nation. December 29, 2016. Retrieved January 1, 2017.
  19. "Some big names in coaching got started under LaVell Edwards". OdfReport. December 30, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  20. "Legendary BYU football coach LaVell Edwards dies at 86". SCOUT. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  21. "Former BYU football coach LaVell Edwards, 86, has died". Standard Examiner. December 29, 2016. Retrieved December 31, 2016.
  22. A Legend in the Making Archived October 13, 2007, at the Wayback Machine
  23. Tribune, The Salt Lake. "BYU football: LaVell Edwards memorial service set for this evening". The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved 2017-01-06.