La Paz County, Arizona

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Coordinates: 33°50′25″N113°56′34″W / 33.84028°N 113.94278°W / 33.84028; -113.94278

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Contents

La Paz County, Arizona
View of Trigo Mountains Wilderness, AZ.jpg
La Paz County, Az.png
Seal
Map of Arizona highlighting La Paz County.svg
Location within the U.S. state of Arizona
Map of USA AZ.svg
Arizona's location within the U.S.
FoundedJanuary 1, 1983
Seat Parker
Largest town Quartzsite
Area
  Total4,514 sq mi (11,691 km2)
  Land4,500 sq mi (11,655 km2)
  Water14 sq mi (36 km2), 0.3%
Population (est.)
  (2018)21,098
  Density4.5/sq mi (1.7/km2)
Congressional district 4th
Time zone Mountain: UTC−7
Website www.co.la-paz.az.us
Courthouse Rock in the Eagletail Mountains, northeastern La Paz County Courthouse Rock, Eagletail Mts.jpg
Courthouse Rock in the Eagletail Mountains, northeastern La Paz County
Classic wulfenite specimen from the old Red Cloud Mine, western La Paz County Wulfenite-258734.jpg
Classic wulfenite specimen from the old Red Cloud Mine, western La Paz County

La Paz County is a county in the western part of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 20,489, [1] making it the second-least populous county in Arizona. The county seat is Parker. [2] The name of the county is the Spanish word for "the peace", and is taken from the early settlement (now ghost town) of La Paz along the Colorado River.

County (United States) Subdivision used by most states in the United States of America

In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority. The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana and Alaska have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Arizona state of the United States of America

Arizona is a state in the southwestern region of the United States. It is also part of the Western and the Mountain states. It is the sixth largest and the 14th most populous of the 50 states. Its capital and largest city is Phoenix. Arizona shares the Four Corners region with Utah, Colorado, and New Mexico; its other neighboring states are Nevada and California to the west and the Mexican states of Sonora and Baja California to the south and southwest.

La Paz County was established in 1983 after voters approved separating the northern portion of Yuma County, making it the only county to be established after Arizona became a state in 1912, and currently the second youngest county in the United States (behind the consolidated city-county of Broomfield, Colorado, which was established in 2001). The county did not have a large enough tax base to begin supporting a separate county government immediately and had to rely on state money at first. As a result, Arizona laws were changed to make splitting other existing counties much more difficult. Under the revised Arizona laws, a county shall not be formed or divided by county initiative unless each proposed county would have all of the following characteristics: (1) at least three-fourths of one percent of the total state assessed valuation and at least the statewide per capita assessed valuation; (2) a population of at least three-fourths of one percent of the total state population according to the most recent United States decennial census; (3) at least one hundred square miles of privately owned land; (4) common boundaries with either (a) at least three other existing or proposed counties; or (b) at least two other existing or proposed counties and the state boundary. [3] A county formation commission is required to be formed to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed county. [4] A proposal to divide a county must be approved by a majority of the votes cast in each proposed new county. [5]

Yuma County, Arizona County in the United States

Yuma County is a county in the southwestern corner of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population was 195,751. The county seat is Yuma.

Broomfield, Colorado Consolidated City and County in Colorado, United States

Broomfield is a consolidated city and county in the U.S. state of Colorado. Broomfield has a consolidated city and county government which operates under Article XX, Sections 10-13 of the Constitution of the State of Colorado. The population was 55,889 at the 2010 United States Census. Broomfield is the 16th most populous municipality and the 13th most populous county in Colorado.

The Colorado River Indian Reservation is located in the western portion of the county. Part of the reservation extends westward into San Bernardino and Riverside counties in California.

San Bernardino County, California County in California, United States

San Bernardino County, officially the County of San Bernardino, is a county located in the southern portion of the U.S. state of California, and is located within the Greater Los Angeles area. As of the 2010 U.S. Census, the population was 2,035,210, making it the fifth-most populous county in California, and the 12th-most populous in the United States. The county seat is San Bernardino.

Riverside County, California County in California, United States

Riverside County is one of fifty-eight counties in the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 2,189,641, making it the 4th-most populous county in California and the 11th-most populous in the United States. The name was derived from the city of Riverside, which is the county seat.

California State of the United States of America

California is a state in the Pacific Region of the United States. With 39.6 million residents, California is the most populous U.S. state and the third-largest by area. The state capital is Sacramento. The Greater Los Angeles Area and the San Francisco Bay Area are the nation's second- and fifth-most populous urban regions, with 18.7 million and 9.7 million residents respectively. Los Angeles is California's most populous city, and the country's second-most populous, after New York City. California also has the nation's most populous county, Los Angeles County, and its largest county by area, San Bernardino County. The City and County of San Francisco is both the country's second-most densely populated major city after New York City and the fifth-most densely populated county, behind only four of the five New York City boroughs.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 4,514 sq mi (11691 km²), of which 4500 sq mi (11655 km²) is land and 14 sq mi (36 km²) (0.3%) is water. [6]

The area that now makes up La Paz County was formerly part of Yuma County.

Flora and fauna

Hi Jolly monument near Quartzsite HadjiAliMonument20080707.JPG
Hi Jolly monument near Quartzsite

La Paz County hosts a variety of flora and fauna. [7] The endangered California Fan Palm, Washingtonia filifera grows in a few spots in the county. [8]

<i>Washingtonia filifera</i> species of plant

Washingtonia filifera, also known as desert fan palm, California fan palm or California palm, is a flowering plant in the palm family (Arecaceae) native to the far southwestern United States and Baja California. Growing to 15–20 m (49–66 ft) tall by 3–6 m (10–20 ft) broad, it is an evergreen monocot with a tree-like growth habit. It has a sturdy, columnar trunk and waxy, fan-shaped (palmate) leaves.

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1990 13,844
2000 19,71542.4%
2010 20,4893.9%
Est. 201821,098 [9] 3.0%
U.S. Decennial Census [10]
1990–2000 [11] 2010–2018 [1]

2000 census

As of the 2000 census, there were 19,715 people, 8,362 households, and 5,619 families residing in the county. The population density was 4.4 people per square mile (1.7/km²). There were 15,133 housing units at an average density of 3.4/sq mi (1.3/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 74.15% white, 0.79% black or African American, 12.53% Native American, 0.41% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 9.35% from other races, and 2.68% from two or more races. 22.42% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.90% reported speaking Spanish at home. [12]

There were 8,362 households, with 21.20% having children under the age of 18, 54.20% were married couples living together, 8.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.80% were non-families. 26.60% of households were made up of individuals and 12.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.79.

The county population had 21.10% under the age of 18, 6.10% from 18 to 24, 20.40% from 25 to 44, 26.60% from 45 to 64, and 25.80% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 105.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 105.10 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $25,839, and the median income for a family was $29,141. Males had a median income of $26,642 versus $20,965 for females. The per capita income for the county was $14,916. About 13.60% of families and 19.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.50% of those under age 18 and 12.90% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 census, there were 20,489 people, 9,198 households, and 5,584 families residing in the county. [13] The population density was 4.5//sq mi (1.8/km²). There were 16,049 housing units at an average density of 3.56/sq mi (1.37/km²). [14] The racial makeup of the county was 69.8% white, 12.8% American Indian, 0.6% black or African American, 0.5% Asian, 12.5% from other races, and 3.7% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 23.5% of the population. [13] In terms of ancestry, 22.4% were German, 15.9% were Irish, 15.3% were English, and 2.1% were American. [15]

Of the 9,198 households, 19.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.2% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 39.3% were non-families, and 32.1% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.19 and the average family size was 2.72. The median age was 53.9 years. [13]

The median income for a household in the county was $32,147 and the median income for a family was $37,721. Males had a median income of $35,464 versus $27,484 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,165. About 14.3% of families and 20.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.4% of those under age 18 and 6.5% of those age 65 or over. [16]

Government

La Paz County is entirely within Arizona's 4th congressional district, currently represented by Republican Paul Gosar.

Presidential elections results
La Paz County vote
by party in presidential elections
[17]
Year Republican Democratic Others
2016 67.3%4,00326.5% 1,5756.3% 373
2012 64.8%3,71432.8% 1,8802.5% 141
2008 62.9%3,50934.6% 1,9292.5% 139
2004 62.4%3,15836.6% 1,8491.0% 52
2000 56.7%2,54339.5% 1,7693.8% 171
1996 42.3% 1,90243.7%1,96414.0% 627
1992 32.2% 1,59936.4%1,80831.3% 1,554
1988 58.6%2,56239.9% 1,7461.6% 68
1984 63.9%2,75734.8% 1,5021.3% 54

Transportation

Major highways

Air

Avi Suquilla Airport ( FAA LID : P20) is a public use airport located one nautical mile (1.9 km) east of the central business district of Parker, Arizona. It is owned by the Colorado River Indian Tribes.

Rail

The county is served by the Arizona and California Railroad for freight through Parker, Arizona.

Communities

Map of La Paz County showing Indian reservation, incorporated areas, and unincorporated area La Paz County Incorporated and Unincorporated areas.svg
Map of La Paz County showing Indian reservation, incorporated areas, and unincorporated area

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated community

Ghost towns

Indian communities

Colorado River Indian Reservation

County population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of La Paz County. [18] [19]

county seat

RankCity/Town/etc.Population (2010 Census)Municipal typeIncorporated
1 Quartzsite 3,677Town1989
2Parker 3,083Town1948
3 Cienega Springs 1,798CDP
4 Salome 1,530CDP
5 Ehrenburg 1,470CDP
6 Bouse 996CDP
7 Wenden 728CDP
8 Bluewater 725CDP
9 La Paz Valley 699CDP
10 Brenda 676CDP
11 Parker Strip 662CDP
12 Vicksburg 597CDP
13 Poston 285CDP
14 Cibola 250CDP
15 Utting 126CDP
16 Alamo Lake 25CDP
17 Sunwest 15CDP

See also

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Bluewater, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Bluewater is a census-designated place (CDP) in La Paz County, Arizona, United States. The population was 725 at the 2010 census.

Bouse, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Bouse is a census-designated place (CDP) in La Paz County, Arizona, United States. Founded in 1908 as a mining camp, the economy of Bouse is now based on tourism, agriculture and retirees. The population was 996 at the 2010 census.

Ehrenberg, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Ehrenberg, also historically spelled "Ehrenburg" is a census-designated place (CDP) in La Paz County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,470 at the 2010 census. Ehrenberg is named for its founder, Herman Ehrenberg.

Parker, Arizona Town in Arizona, United States

Parker is the county seat of La Paz County, Arizona, United States, on the Colorado River in Parker Valley. The population was 3,083 at the 2010 census.

Parker Strip, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Parker Strip is a census-designated place (CDP) in La Paz County, Arizona, United States. The population was 3,302 at the 2000 census.

Poston, Arizona Place in Arizona, United States

Poston is a census-designated place (CDP) in La Paz County, Arizona, United States, in Parker Valley. The population was 389 at the 2000 census.

Salome, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Salome is a census-designated place (CDP) in La Paz County, Arizona, United States. The population was 1,530 at the 2010 census. It was established in 1904 by Dick Wick Hall, Ernest Hall and Charles Pratt, and was named after Pratt's wife, Grace Salome Pratt.

Wenden, Arizona CDP in Arizona, United States

Wenden is a census-designated place (CDP) in La Paz County, Arizona, United States. The population was 556 at the 2000 census.

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References

  1. 1 2 "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  2. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 11-132(B)
  4. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 11-136
  5. Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 11-137(H)
  6. "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved August 23, 2015.
  7. Forrest Shreve and Ira Loren Wiggins. 1964. Vegetation and flora of the Sonoran Desert, p. 50 et seq., Stanford University Press, 1740 pages ISBN   0-8047-0163-6, ISBN   978-0-8047-0163-1
  8. C. Michael Hogan. 2009. California Fan Palm: Washingtonia filifera, GlobalTwitcher.com, ed. Nicklas Stromberg Archived September 30, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  9. "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved May 10, 2019.
  10. "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  11. "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 18, 2014.
  12. MLA map
  13. 1 2 3 "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  14. "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  15. "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  16. "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 20, 2016.
  17. "Dave Leip's Atlas of United States Presidential Elections" . Retrieved June 11, 2011.
  18. 2010 Census Archived December 21, 2013, at WebCite
  19. 2010 Census Maps