Lachlan Macquarie

Last updated

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Sources

Further reading

Lachlan Macquarie
CB
Ln-Governor-Lachlan macquarie.jpg
5th Governor of New South Wales
In office
1 January 1810 30 November 1821
Government offices
Preceded by Governor of New South Wales
1810–1821
Succeeded by