Lady Augusta Murray

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Lady Augusta Murray
Lady Augusta Murray.jpg
Born(1768-01-27)27 January 1768
London, England
Died5 March 1830(1830-03-05) (aged 62)
Ramsgate, Kent, England
Spouse(s)
Children Augustus d'Este
Augusta Emma d'Este
Parent(s) John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore
Lady Charlotte Stewart

Lady Augusta Murray (27 January 1768 5 March 1830) was a mistress of Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, the sixth son of George III. Although they married, their union was in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act 1772 and as such was considered legally void. As a result she could not be styled as the Duchess of Sussex or be referred to as a Royal Highness.

Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex British prince

Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, was the sixth son and ninth child of King George III and his consort Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. He was the only surviving son of George III who did not pursue an army or navy career. He was known for his liberal views, which included reform of Parliament, abolition of the slave trade, Catholic emancipation, and the removal of existing civil restrictions on Jews and dissenters.

George III of the United Kingdom King of Great Britain and Ireland

George III was King of Great Britain and King of Ireland from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland until his death in 1820. He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick-Lüneburg ("Hanover") in the Holy Roman Empire before becoming King of Hanover on 12 October 1814. He was the third British monarch of the House of Hanover, but unlike his two predecessors, he was born in Great Britain, spoke English as his first language, and never visited Hanover.

Royal Marriages Act 1772 law requiring potential heirs to the British throne to receive royal permission to marry

The Royal Marriages Act 1772 was an act of the Parliament of Great Britain, which prescribed the conditions under which members of the British royal family could contract a valid marriage, in order to guard against marriages that could diminish the status of the royal house. The right of veto vested in the sovereign by this act provoked severe adverse criticism at the time of its passage. It was repealed as a result of the 2011 Perth Agreement, which came into force on 26 March 2015. Under the Succession to the Crown Act 2013, the first six people in the line of succession need permission to marry if they and their descendants are to remain in the line of succession.

Contents

Early life

Lady Augusta was born in London. Her father was John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, and her mother was Lady Charlotte Stewart, daughter of Alexander Stewart, 6th Earl of Galloway.

London Capital of the United Kingdom

London is the capital and largest city of both England and the United Kingdom. Standing on the River Thames in the south-east of England, at the head of its 50-mile (80 km) estuary leading to the North Sea, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. Londinium was founded by the Romans. The City of London, London's ancient core − an area of just 1.12 square miles (2.9 km2) and colloquially known as the Square Mile − retains boundaries that follow closely its medieval limits. The City of Westminster is also an Inner London borough holding city status. Greater London is governed by the Mayor of London and the London Assembly.

John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore Scottish peer and colonial governor

John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, PC, generally known as Lord Dunmore, was a Scottish peer and colonial governor in the American colonies and The Bahamas. He was the last royal governor of Virginia.

Alexander Stewart, 6th Earl of Galloway was the son of James Stewart, 5th Earl of Galloway by Catherine, daughter of Alexander Montgomerie, 9th Earl of Eglinton (c.1660-1729).

Marriage

Lady Augusta secretly married Prince Augustus Frederick, sixth son of King George III, on 4 April 1793, in a Church of England ceremony in Hotel Sarmiento, Rome, Italy. They were later married again in a religious ceremony on 5 December 1793 in St George's, Hanover Square, London, using their correct names but without revealing their full identities. So far as English law was concerned, both marriage ceremonies were in contravention of the Royal Marriages Act 1772 and was annulled in August 1794. Lady Augusta could not take the style of Princess of Great Britain or of Her Royal Highness.

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Rome Capital city and comune in Italy

Rome is the capital city and a special comune of Italy. Rome also serves as the capital of the Lazio region. With 2,872,800 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi), it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth most populous city in the European Union by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4,355,725 residents, thus making it the most populous metropolitan city in Italy. Rome is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber. The Vatican City is an independent country inside the city boundaries of Rome, the only existing example of a country within a city: for this reason Rome has been often defined as capital of two states.

Italy republic in Southern Europe

Italy, officially the Italian Republic, is a European country consisting of a peninsula delimited by the Italian Alps and surrounded by several islands. Located in the middle of the Mediterranean sea and traversed along its length by the Apennines, Italy has a largely temperate seasonal climate. The country covers an area of 301,340 km2 (116,350 sq mi) and shares open land borders with France, Slovenia, Austria, Switzerland and the enclaved microstates of Vatican City and San Marino. Italy has a territorial exclave in Switzerland (Campione) and a maritime exclave in the Tunisian sea (Lampedusa). With around 60 million inhabitants, Italy is the fourth-most populous member state of the European Union.

Together the couple had two children:

Sir Augustus Frederick d'Este, KCH was a relative of the British royal family and the earliest recorded person for whom a definite diagnosis of multiple sclerosis can be made.

Augusta Emma dEste British noble

Augusta Emma Wilde, Baroness Truro was the daughter of Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex, later Duke of Sussex, by his marriage with the Lady Augusta Murray, second daughter of John Murray, 4th Earl of Dunmore, and his countess, Lady Charlotte Stewart.

Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro British lawyer, judge and politician

Thomas Wilde, 1st Baron Truro, was a British lawyer, judge and politician. He was Lord Chancellor of Great Britain between 1850 and 1852.

Despite the annulment, Prince Augustus continued to live with Lady Augusta until 1801, when he received a parliamentary grant of £12,000. On 27 November 1801 the King his father created Prince Augustus Duke of Sussex, Earl of Inverness, and Baron Arklow in the Peerage of the United Kingdom and appointed him a Knight of the Garter.

Duke of Sussex royal dukedom in the United Kingdom

Duke of Sussex is a substantive title, one of several royal dukedoms, that has been created twice in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. It takes its name from the county of Sussex in England.

Earl of Inverness

The title of Earl of Inverness was first created in 1718 in the Jacobite Peerage of Scotland, together with the titles Viscount of Innerpaphrie and Lord Cromlix and Erne, by James Francis Edward Stuart for the Honourable John Hay of Cromlix, third son of the 7th Earl of Kinnoull. He was created Duke of Inverness in 1727, but both titles became extinct upon the death of the grantee in 1740.

The title Baron Arklow has been created twice in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. Arklow is in County Wicklow in Ireland.

Later life

After 1801, the couple went their separate ways. In 1806 Lady Augusta was given royal licence to use the surname De Ameland instead of Murray. [1] Lady Augusta retained custody of the children and received a maintenance of £4,000 a year. She died in Ramsgate, Kent. After Lady Augusta's death the Duke of Sussex married Lady Cecilia Underwood, and lived at Kensington Palace.

Ramsgate town in Kent, England

Ramsgate is a seaside town in the district of Thanet in east Kent, England. It was one of the great English seaside towns of the 19th century. In 2001 it had a population of about 40,000. Ramsgate’s main attraction is its coastline, and its main industries are tourism and fishing. The town has one of the largest marinas on the English south coast, and the Port of Ramsgate provided cross-channel ferries for many years.

Kent County of England

Kent is a county in South East England and one of the home counties. It borders Greater London to the north-west, Surrey to the west and East Sussex to the south-west. The county also shares borders with Essex along the estuary of the River Thames, and with the French department of Pas-de-Calais through the Channel Tunnel. The county town is Maidstone.

Kensington Palace royal residence set in Kensington Gardens, London, England

Kensington Palace is a royal residence set in Kensington Gardens, in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. It has been a residence of the British Royal Family since the 17th century, and is currently the official London residence of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, Princess Eugenie and her husband Jack Brooksbank, the Duke and Duchess of Gloucester, the Duke and Duchess of Kent, and Prince and Princess Michael of Kent.

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References

  1. "No. 15966". The London Gazette . 18 October 1806. p. 1364.